Tag: Anaheim Kings


Maloofs move significantly to meet Sac’s proposal, Kings fans provide political cover for arena deal to get done


In the end, it was about a city and its team, and the will to fight for what was theirs.

Kevin Johnson did the heavy lifting and the heavy hitters moved the ball forward, but it was the Sacramento Kings fans that gave the local politicians the will and the way to see the Kings arena deal to fruition.

The Maloofs and Johnson emerged from Monday’s arena talks with tears in their eyes and an arena deal ready to go. In speaking with sources on the Sacramento negotiating team this morning, even they did not know that an arena deal was coming back with city manager John Shirey on the flight home.

Moreover, other sources involved with negotiations indicated that the Maloofs moved over $20-$30 million on their position coming into today’s meeting, with Sam Amick reporting that the inclusion of a Maloof-paid ticket surcharge provided the mechanism.

While the symbolic celebration is yet to come (hold onto your hats Sacramento), this marks the end of a year-long journey that saw the Kings all-but leave town. I attended the potential final game in Sacramento against the hated Lakers, and watched as grown men cried and thousands refused to leave the stadium. I listened as some of the media in attendance snickered at the audacity of fans to believe they could keep their team.

Nobody, and I repeat nobody, had the Kings staying in Sacramento.

And because of those resolute fans, everybody from the mayor to the city council, the media and the team, and the ultimately the NBA – were forced to believe that a deal could be done.

They chanted at games and made fliers, they made movies, they attended city council meetings, and they used Twitter like they owned it. There was a group called #HereWeStay that started the social media fire, a local radio host named Carmichael Dave with an affinity for Braveheart moments, and a group called #Fans that delivered human PowerPoint presentations at city council meetings.

And there were many more. They were extremely organized, and they numbered in thousands. And for all the heavy hitters that drove the process, they wouldn’t have gotten past first base if the local media and pols didn’t have the political cover those fans provided. Everywhere you turned, it was #HereWeThis and #HereWeThat, supplemented by the education-driven #FANS group that hammered home the message that the arena was #BiggerThanBasketball.

Indeed, the arena is going to revitalize an area of Sacramento that desperately needs help, boosting the local economy while providing jobs and increased property tax revenue for years to come. It’s the shot in the arm the region needs to get back on its feet, and for once, Kings fans get the win that has eluded them for so long.

There are more steps to go as the term sheet will now be brought home by Shirey and the city council will look it over the next few days. As I reported for ProBasketballTalk last week, as long as a set of achievable criteria is met, they will have at least the five votes necessary to approve a parking plan that will solidify the city’s contribution. The fact is, however, that the city of Sacramento doesn’t walk out of that meeting with a deal not knowing if they have the votes to get it done.

The council will vote on March 6 to approve the term sheet and from there only insignificant procedural votes will remain on the to-do list. The Maloofs will ultimately pay in the ballpark of $70 to $77 million toward the cost of the $387-400 million Entertainment and Sports Complex, which is set to open in 2015. It’s my prediction that we’ll learn about an All Star game landing in Sacto in 2016.

The rest of the details will be fleshed out as the parties return to Sacramento and cross the Ts and dot the Is.

For now though, none of that matters. Kings fans have been on pins and needles for well over a year – and they finally get to take a day off. Even those of us in the media covering the story on a daily basis, we’ll take a breath and just enjoy a good story that ended well. And if you own a bar in the Sacramento area tonight, it’s probably a good time to make some purple beer.

Congratulations Kings fans, the Dom Perignon is in the mail.

There they stay: Framework in place to keep Kings in Sacramento


Much regarding the basketball future of the Sacramento Kings remains up in the air, but this particular Monday brought an unequaled security to the franchise, its city, and the Kings’ legions of ardent fans. According to Sam Amick of SI.com, the Monday meeting held to discuss arena funding plans in Sacramento has produced the “framework of an agreement going forward,” per Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson. Amick also reported that the Maloof family will initially contribute more than $70 million to the aforementioned funding plan, in addition to further financial contributions throughout the life of the deal.

We’re beyond the point of dissecting what sports teams mean to fans on a personal level, to communities on a collective level, and to cities on an economic level. This is a huge, huge day for every person involved in each of those tiers — from the die-hard who won’t be able to wipe that smile off of their face for the next week to the business owner who created a model dependent on the ripple benefits that having a nearby NBA team provides. This development puts the city of Seattle that much further from getting the NBA team it deserves, but in the process prevents Sacramento from becoming the next Seattle — maligned by the swift exit of their cherished club and sadly jaded by having loved and lost.

There are still countless steps between Point A and Point B, but the important thing is that Point A exists at all. The Kings’ future in Sacramento was in serious jeopardy just a few months ago, but Johnson, the Maloofs, NBA commissioner David Stern, a fervent social media campaign, and the efforts of an entire city have further rooted the Kings in the city they call home.

Sacramento City Council takes unanimous step toward key arena vote

kings purple

One vote down to bring a new arena to Sacramento, one more critical vote to go.

Tuesday, the Sacramento City Council voted unanimously to continue finalizing proposals with private parking companies, who will in turn provide $200 million or more toward a new Entertainment and Sports Complex. For that money, the winning bidder will have the right to operate the city-owned parking assets for up to 50 years. This is a critical piece of mayor Kevin Johnson’s plan to keep the Kings in Sacramento, and a ‘no’ vote last night would have sent the team packing, though as I reported earlier Tuesday it wasn’t going to come to that.

That report also included a breakdown of the situation and news that the council will have the votes to approve an arena deal before the March 1 deadline, so long as a laundry list of achievable criteria is met.

That criteria, including safeguards on the parking deal and project cost overruns, is going to be worked out over the next two weeks as the city, the private parties, the NBA, and the Maloofs will come together to create a term sheet for the council to vote on. The vote is expected to be held on February 28, but it’s possible, even likely, that the NBA will allow for an extension on their deadline so they can review the terms at a reasonable pace. That announcement could come on All Star weekend.

Tuesday’s vote wasn’t expected to be contentious, but hundreds of Kings fans still showed up to make their case to the council. They wore white T-shirts with words such as growth, economic engine, events, downtown, nightlife, etc, and did their best not to recreate the acoustics in Power Balance Pavilion.

While there were eight speakers signed up make the opposition’s case, mayor Johnson was forced to limit public comment in support of the arena due to obvious time constraints.

After about 20 arena proponents were allowed to address the council, Johnson asked those in support of the arena that didn’t get a chance to speak to stand up and be recognized. Nearly everybody in the double-decker room stood up.

For well over five years Sacramento has been seen as impotent in its ability to get an arena deal done, but even council members that are in opposition of the current deal seemed resigned to their fate. Sandy Sheedy, the most vocal opponent of the deal, put up little to no fight on the issue and the other opponents chose not to speak. Surely they could be saving their breath for when the games count, but in doing so they lost a critical chance to curry favor with the anti-arena crowd, if it even exists.

The vote in 2006 to implement a sales tax for a new Kings arena lost by an 80-to-20 margin, but what most people don’t know is that it was an extremely flawed and eventually abandoned measure that never had a chance.

Tuesday night a strong message was sent to the NBA and competing cities that an arena deal is coming.  Staring into the sea of white T-shirts, with little to no opposition to be found, it was hard to understand how it took them so long in the first place.