Tag: Alvin Gentry


Michael Redd calls surprise start “one of the proudest moments of his career” after Suns beat the Bobcats


Michael Redd arrived at the US Airways Center in Phoenix more than four hours before his Suns were set to face the Charlotte Bobcats on Saturday. The reason, he said, was just to get some extra work in and to keep himself prepared for when his time would come to play more minutes.

He found out shortly before tip-off that his time was now.

Redd was in the starting lineup for the first time in over two years, and made it count by scoring a team-high 17 points in the Suns’ 95-89 victory over the NBA’s worst team.

“One of the proudest moments of my career,” Redd said afterward, when asked what this performance meant to him. “To get the win was obviously the key. But to come back, through the tears, through the hurt, through the hours of rehab, training to come back and accomplish this, is maybe the most proud moment of my career, actually.”

Redd’s last start came on Jan. 10, 2010, in the game where he suffered a devastating and career-threatening knee injury for the second time. The start on Saturday came courtesy of a thigh bruise suffered by Jared Dudley in Phoenix’s Friday night loss to the Rockets. It also came as a surprise.

“He didn’t even tell me, actually,” Redd said, when asked when he was told he’d get the start. “[Coach] told me during the pre-game scouting, ‘Mike, you have [Reggie Williams].’ I said, ‘Okaaaay.’ So everything had to switch from coming off the bench to having a starting mentality. I was honored by the fact that he would even ask me to do that, that he would have enough faith in me and trust in me.”

Things didn’t start off on the highest of notes for Redd. He missed his first four shots, but hit six of his final eight to finish the night at 50 percent shooting, which included draining four of his seven three-point attempts. He blamed adrenaline for the slow start, and credited his teammates for helping him stay positive as he was able to work through it.

“My teammates kept encouraging me,” Redd said. ” ‘Mike, you’re going to be just fine, you’ve got to run the bugs out.’ The adrenaline was going, but once I hit my first three, I kind of settled in.”

Not only did Redd score, but he did so when his team needed that boost the most. The Bobcats played well for much of the night, and built their lead to as many as 10 early in the third quarter. Redd scored five straight points to begin the Suns’ run to right the ship, and then hit a three that erased the lead completely and tied the game at 67.

Some of Redd’s looks were self-created, but on several of his attempts, he was left wide open. He admitted that he was surprised by that, and said it’s been a long, long time since he’s had that much space to operate.

“Yeah, I haven’t seen that since the Ray Allen and Big Dog (Glenn Robinson) days (playing for the Bucks), when Ray Allen was over here, Glenn was right here, and Sam Cassell was right there, so I’d be left open,” he said. “I haven’t seen that in a long time. I’m usually seeing double teams and all kinds of traps, so it was great.”

If Redd can maintain any type of consistency with his offense, it would be equally great for a Suns team that is committed to keeping Steve Nash and making a run at the playoffs. Alvin Gentry has already tinkered with the lineups and rotations plenty this season, and keeping Redd with the starters for at least another couple of games should be the logical choice. Dudley can come off the bench, and can still play the same number of minutes he’s accustomed to playing, while providing energy, cohesion, and stability for the second unit.

It’s been 10 years since Redd played in Milwaukee with the guys he mentioned. It only seems like that long since he has been completely healthy, when he was a player opposing teams needed to plan for on the offensive end of the floor. But after getting back into the starting lineup and looking good while doing so, that time might once again be upon us.

Gentry says Suns “have to find a way to play with Nash off the floor”

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The Suns are off to a 6-12 start, which isn’t exactly where the team hoped or expected to be a little more than a quarter of the way through this lockout-shortened season. The problems certainly can’t be traced back to Steve Nash, who leads the league in assists despite Phoenix playing at a much slower pace than they have in seasons past.

It’s when Nash has headed to the bench to get some rest that things have fallen apart.

Friday’s blowout loss to the Blazers was perhaps the most glaring example of this to date. Phoenix played a solid first quarter on the road, and held a three-point lead when the period came to an end. Then, Nash went out, the reserves managed to score just 9 points in the second, the Blazers were up 14 by halftime, and the rout was on.

“We’ve got to be able to do things with Steve off the floor,” head coach Alvin Gentry said, before his team took the floor against the Grizzlies on Saturday. “We’re up three, then we’re down 14 at the half. We decide to take him out a little early to see if maybe we can get him back in the game earlier, and all of a sudden we’re down 30. We’ve got to be able to do things and compete with him off the floor.”

Gentry changed up the team’s starting lineup and reserve rotations five games ago, but after three straight losses, he is going back to the starting lineup of Nash, Grant Hill, Marcin Gortat, Channing Frye, and Jared Dudley that he used at the beginning of the season. As he searches for the right combinations of players, he lamented the lack of practice time that the compressed 66-game schedule simply doesn’t allow.

“The only thing that I will say is, it’s frustrating to have these things that you need to work on and not have practice time to do it,” Gentry said. “We need the practice time. We have guys that benefit greatly from the practice time, and we just don’t have it.”

Now of course, every team is affected by this. The Suns, though, have an admitted lack of overall top talent, along with some new players who could use the time to learn the team’s offensive strategies in full-speed, teaching situations. But Gentry, at this point,  thinks it would be too taxing on his players to try to trade days off for practices.

“We could have practices, and then we could have a situation where now we’re going to have a two-hour practice or an hour and a half practice or whatever after playing three games in four nights,” Gentry said. “To me, it doesn’t make sense. We try to practice and work as much as we can, but I think you’ve got to be smart about it also. If we’re going to practice and not have everybody there, it doesn’t serve a purpose anyway.”

Nash and Hill likely would be the ones who wouldn’t have their aging frames put through those paces.

We’ll see what changes Gentry has in store for his rotations; if he’s looking to add offense, he’ll need to find more minutes for Hakim Warrick, who’s been consistent when he’s gotten the chance, and Michael Redd, who might be able to provide something, but hasn’t gotten the chance.

Whatever improvements do come will have to come from the second unit. And Gentry knows that.

“Some kind of way, we’ve got to get it to the point where we’re playing with Steve off the floor,” he said. “Because Steve can’t play 48 minutes.”

Nash calls Kobe’s 48 against the Suns “one of the best performances” he’s seen

Kobe Bryant, Grant Hill

By now you’ve surely heard about Kobe Bryant’s 48 points he put up in a win over the Suns on Tuesday. You likely are also aware that Bryant is playing through torn wrist ligaments in his shooting hand, and that perhaps he’s been shooting too much, to the detriment of this Lakers team.

The fact that you are thinking it is probably one of the reasons for Bryant’s most recent streak of domination.

In the five games since that fateful 6-for-28 shooting performance in Denver, Bryant has averaged 36 points per game, while shooting better than 51 percent from the field. But the pinnacle came in the performance against Phoenix, and Steve Nash was as impressed as anyone with what he saw.

“It’s one of the best performances I’ve seen,” Nash said after Wednesday afternoon’s practice. “Not only because he had 48 points, but I thought Grant [Hill] guarded him incredibly well. He still made just shot after shot — contested and difficult shots. It was incredible.”

Hill actually did a decent job on Bryant to start the game, as Suns head coach Alvin Gentry was quick to point out.

“Grant guarded him the first eight minutes and he had four points,” Gentry said. “The last three minutes of the quarter he had 13. Obviously once you get a guy going like that, he gets in a comfort zone.”

Bryant has said that it’s personal when it comes to the Suns, and ESPN.com’s J.A. Adande took it a step further by speculating that Bryant’s ire might be directed specifically at Nash:

Kobe keeps saying how much he hates the Phoenix Suns.

But there’s almost nothing left from the Suns teams that knocked the Lakers out of the first round of the playoffs in 2006 and 2007. The coach is gone, the general manager is gone, every other player is gone … there’s even a different guy doing tricks in the gorilla suit. The only one who remains is Steve Nash. The same Steve Nash who won the Most Valuable Player award over Bryant in 2005 and 2006.

“I don’t like them,” Bryant said of the Suns. “Plain and simple, I do not like them. They used to whip us pretty good and used to let us know about it, and I. Will. Not. Forget. That.”

If it is personal for Bryant, Nash certainly wasn’t willing to add anything to that internal fire Bryant already has burning for the Phoenix organization.

“I don’t know what to say about that,” Nash said. “I don’t know what his thought process is there. He had a great game, so if it’s personal, it was very, very ‘personally’ great.”

Nash said after Tuesday’s game that Bryant is “the best player in the world.” He stood by that assessment on Wednesday, while specifically giving Kobe the edge over LeBron James.

“I didn’t change my mind over night,” he said. “I mean, LeBron’s neck and neck with Kobe. But Kobe just, time and time again, has proven what he can do. He’s a finisher, he’s a scorer, and he’s a great competitor.”

Michael Redd likely to see his first action with the Suns later this week


Michael Redd signed with the Suns back on Dec. 29, and at the time, the message was clear that there would be no rush in getting him to the court. But after 10 days of workouts with the team, it appears that his time is almost here.

“I think he’s almost to the point where we can stick him in a game and play him a few minutes and kind of let him get acclimated to what we’re doing,” said Suns head coach Alvin Gentry, before Phoenix easily took care of the Milwaukee Bucks on Sunday. “Maybe even Thursday or Friday, we may just have an opportunity to stick him in and see. We’ll just have to see what happens with him in the next couple of days, see how he’s feeling. But I think he’s getting close to wanting to have some game action and see where he is.”

Redd has been seen working hard on the arena floor before the team’s last two home games, and says he feels like he’s getting closer to being in game shape.

“I feel good,” Redd said. “Just trying to get myself prepared for a game situation. But I feel great; there’s no pain. There have been no setbacks at all. The training staff has been working with me night and day to continue to get stronger, continue to get better, and I feel good.”

When told of Gentry’s proclamation that game time might be on the horizon as soon as this week, it was news to Redd. But he took the coach’s remarks as a positive evaluation of his progress.

“That’s encouraging,” he said. “They must see something, then. I don’t have any expectations of minutes, I’ve come to just work and get better, and whatever [coach] asks me to do, I’ll do. Which, he said, is pretty much scoring. But it’s fun, my teammates have been great, they welcomed me in. The coaching staff and the organization’s been great.”

Redd is also predictably excited about getting the opportunity to lace ’em up alongside a playmaker like Steve Nash.

“Oh my gosh, It’s a dream, man. It’s a shooter’s dream to play with a guy like that,” Redd said. “His vision is impeccable, the man just knows how to play the game. Playing against this team I had a great respect for him, but playing with him now, you can see why he’s so great.”

With Redd’s decline in minutes over the past three seasons due to injury, it’s easy to forget the level of talent he possesses. But when healthy, he’s among the purest shooters in the game. At this stage of his career, he seems humble and ready to do whatever he can to help — even if he’s not sure where exactly he might fit with this Suns team just yet.

“I’ll find my way,” he said. “It won’t be hard for me to just continue to do what coach asks me to do, learn the system, learn the plays. Which I’ve been trying to do this past week. Then just play basketball. That’s it.”

Suns head coach Gentry cares not for your three-point field goal defensive statistics

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The Phoenix Suns, just like most teams in the league, pay a fair amount of attention to all kinds of statistical data. And, just like most teams in the league, they have their favorites. It’s safe to say that three-point field goal defensive statistics are not one of them.

Before Friday night’s win over the Trail Blazers, it was pointed out to Suns head coach Alvin Gentry that Portland was among the league’s best at defending the three-point shot — an area where the Suns have struggled mightily so far this season, despite taking a high number of attempts from distance. So, the question was this: Would Phoenix try to do anything differently in that area given Portland’s defensive success?

Not exactly. And Gentry was completely dismissive of the statistic while giving his response.

“I don’t buy into that,” Gentry said of a given team’s supposedly strong defensive numbers against the three-point shot. “I think that’s the worst stat in the NBA, defending the three. I think teams either shoot it well against you or they don’t. You know, most of the three-point shots that are taken are open shots; people are usually not forcing three-point shots.”

For the record, the Suns haven’t faced Kobe Bryant and the Lakers yet this season, but you get the idea.

“Maybe they close out better or they do a good job of running you off, I don’t know,” Gentry said. “It’s just not a stat I think is relevant at all, I really don’t.”

Now, Gentry’s comment on this particular stat isn’t at all indicative of the way his team approaches statistical data in general. Phoenix considers publicly available information like defensive field goal percentage allowed valuable, and went so far as to place boards in the locker room last season which tracked those numbers league-wide for his players to see on a daily basis.

This year, Gentry and new assistant coach Elston Turner have talked about the difference between dead-ball and live-ball turnovers, and the importance of making sure his team is making a conscious effort to cut down on the latter. And, the team tracks its own internal numbers in a variety of areas to provide data to back up the coaching staff’s chosen points of emphasis.

The three-point defensive statistic, however, is not one of them.

It’s easy to see why Portland currently leads the league in defensive three-point field goal percentage allowed at .254. They have a seemingly endless number of long, athletic guys who, by merely getting a hand up in the vicinity of a long-range shooter, would seemingly be able to alter that shot.

But looking at the teams that rank third and fourth in the same category — Milwaukee and Sacramento respectively, who combined have just 5 wins in 14 games on the season — it becomes a little bit murkier to see the correlation.

In case you were wondering, Gentry isn’t simply being a “hater” here. Phoenix is better than average in this regard, currently sitting at eighth in the league by holding teams to a .299 shooting percentage from behind the three-point arc.

We’re early in the season, and still in the area of extremely small sample size when trying to measure the validity of certain statistical information. What is clear, though, is that the Suns won’t be altering their approach based on another team’s statistical success in defending the long-range shot.

In fact, Gentry was so cavalier in discussing the topic that he jokingly equated it to the statistical data surrounding the “defense” of an opponent’s free throw attempts.

“I think teams shot worse against us from the foul line last year; I think we were in the top five,” Gentry said. “I don’t know that we did a whole lot to defend the free throw line.”