Tag: Adonal Foyle

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J.J. Redick talks about his love of food

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J.J. Redick doesn’t just have one of the NBA’s purest shooting strokes — he’s apparently one of the best gourmands in the NBA. In a recent interview with sportsandfood.com, Redick talked about how he’s become a “foodie” since his Duke days:

J.J. Redick: I was never a very adventurous eater growing up, despite the fact that my mother is a nutritionist and my parents have always had a garden in our yard. When I was at Duke, I finally had an avocado — accidentally — on a turkey sandwich. I was hooked. Next thing I know, I couldn’t get enough guacamole. Avocado was the first thing I ever ate that was outside my box. As I finished up my time at Duke, I certainly wasn’t a “foodie” but I was learning to enjoy the finer things in the culinary world.

During my third year with the Magic, I took a trip with Chelsea (my girlfriend at the time and now my wife) to Mexico and we both tried some foods we had never tried before. At that point, February of 2009, I officially became a “foodie.” Now I will try almost anything and can enjoy some different foods, such as pork jowls.

Redick goes on to name his favorite restaurants in Orlando, his favorite restaurants around the world, and his “normal” in-season diet. The least surprising part of this interview? Before retiring, Redick’s teammate Adonal Foyle was the biggest foodie in the NBA, and is also a wonderful cook. Seriously, why doesn’t Foyle have a morning show at this point?

Adonal Foyle gets front office job with Magic

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Foyle.jpgAdonal Foyle was about as beloved as an NBA journeyman can be. Because he was a lot more than that.

Foyle was active in philanthropy, part of the players union and just a renaissance man in the world of basketball. Media, fans, teammates, everybody loved him. When he retired last month people hated to see him go, they wondered what was next for him.

How about director of player development for the Orlando Magic? That became official today with word from the Magic.

It means he will be a go between for players and management, plus he will work on, well, player development. Which in his case will mean more than just developing a good spin move to the left. Which seems kind of perfect for him.

Everyone is just happy to hear that Foyle will still be around the league. It wouldn’t have been the same without him.

Adonal Foyle retires, but he has a long journey ahead

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According to Brian Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel, Adonal Foyle has decided to retire. That’s not “Magic center Adonal Foyle,” or “twelve-year veteran Adonal Foyle,” even if he happens to be both of those things. Rather, the NBA’s most renowned renaissance man, one of its most inquisitive minds, and one if its most philanthropic individuals will hang them up. It’s not an announcement that will necessarily affect anyone’s win total, but the league will be a little bit less interesting without Foyle as a part of it.

Robbins threw out two interesting tidbits regarding Foyle’s (and the NBA’s) future:

Because of his retirement, Foyle said he likely will resign his
position as first vice president of the National Basketball Players
Association within the next few days.

The Magic’s director of player development position is vacant, and Foyle could be an ideal fit for the job. But aside from continuing his humanitarian work — he founded the
nonprofit Kerosene Lamp Foundation in 2005 to help children — Foyle
said he hasn’t considered what he’ll do next.

He said, “Right now, I just want to finish this part of my life and
then really try to figure out how to journey to the next spot.”

That first note is important. Foyle has long been an important part of the NBPA’s operations, and with negotiations over the terms of a new CBA ongoing, losing an asset like Foyle is a pretty big deal. There are still plenty of ways he can be involved in that process, but losing a direct avenue for Foyle’s knowledge, perspective, and charisma is a loss for the players.

Robbins also kind of nominates Foyle as a candidate for Orlando’s director of player development gig, which comes as something of a disappointment. As Eric Freeman noted earlier this year on the now-defunct Sporting News blog, The Baseline, “Foyle has always seemed, if not exactly better than basketball, than at least more attuned to the emotions and larger issues that the game reminds us of rather than the sport itself.”

Simply put, there are guys who live and die with the game, and there are those for which there is always something more. Maybe not a greater calling, but a different one. Foyle has seemed to be such a player — Freeman mentioned at the time that Foyle’s reputation may be deceiving in that regard — and to that I’ll echo a slight disappointment should Adonal opt for a more conventional post-NBA path.

NBA Players Association about to send proposal to owners, which will get laughed at

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stern_Hunter.jpgBack in February, the NBA Players Association laughed at and rejected outright a new Collective Bargaining Agreement proposal from owners. That proposal used the current economy as a reason to call for a radical shift in the NBA’s deal with players: Shifting 10 percent more of basketball income to the owners, a hard salary cap, no guaranteed contracts, and making all current contracts retroactively conform to the new deal.

The players said no way. Now after their weekend meetings in Las Vegas the Players Association is about to submit its first counter proposal to the owners, according to a FanHouse report.

The owners are going to laugh and treat it the same way the players treated their first proposal. Because the players first offer will want things to stay pretty much exactly as they are.

That’s part of the negotiating game — in your first offer you ask for the moon, knowing that there will be compromises but in the end you can get some of what you want.

But right now, the Players Association and owners disagree on the basic economics of the league, the foundation for any deal. The owners say they are losing money fast, with Stern saying at the All-Star break they would lose $400 million this year. The players disagree, pointing to teams like Dallas and New York where arena and television networks owned by the same owner are not factored properly into what counts as profit. Plus, the economy is starting to improve.

What does it mean, fans? Brace for a lockout one year from now.

“It’s very simple. We don’t want a lockout,” (Adonal) Foyle, an Orlando center, said Sunday in a phone interview with FanHouse about what could occur when the current collective bargaining agreement (CBA) expires June 30, 2011. “We think that this business is going very well. But, at the same time, we are preparing guys for the next year just to make sure. We’re telling them to save their money more … We’ll take a deal yesterday or take a deal tomorrow. But it has to be a fair deal….

“I think it’s safe to say that we’re very aware of what’s happening in the economy, and we’re very sensitive to what’s happening globally,” Foyle said. “But we have looked at everything with the overall (financial) numbers (involving the NBA). At the end of the game … it’s how the numbers are split up (between the owners and the players).”…

“The league is very profitable,” Foyle said. “I think that the league is healthy … We’re waiting on the final numbers (from the NBA season, which should be available in the first week of July). The salary cap is not going to be as low as it had been expected, and that’s a pretty good indication we’re doing OK. It was thought it could be as low as $51 million … But it might be just a one-percent drop (many project the cap will be about $56 million, which actually would be nearly a three-percent drop from 2009-10’s $57.7 million).”

Adonal Foyle weighs retirement

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Foyle.jpgAdonal Foyle did not set foot on the court last season. He played 62 minutes the year before. Blame his knees — he had he right one operated on back in training camp, then later in the season he hurt the left one.

That’s the kind of thing that has a man thinking about retirement from the game, he told the Orlando Sentinel.

“I’m going to take some time, the next two months, and really assess where I’m at and what I want to do and be honest with myself as to what I can do and what I can’t do,” Foyle said. “I’ve been always good at that. Then, I’ll make a decision hopefully by August.”

Foyle is one of the good guys. He has created two foundations: Democracy Matters (working to engage youth in the political process) and The Kerosene Lamp Foundation (promoting health and education awareness for youth, as well as putting on basketball clinics and providing other opportunities). Foyle was raised on Canouan, a Caribbean island, where his family was so poor not only did they not have electricity in the house but also could not afford candles. He studied at night by a kerosene lamp.

Now he has a degree from Colgate, writes poetry and uses his money to help youth. He’s a guy who will be missed if he chooses to step away.