Tag: Adidas EuroCamp

Adidas Eurocamp - Day 2

Vlade Divac in favor of NBA’s anti-flopping rules


TREVISO, Italy — Vlade Divac was the guest speaker for day two of adidas Eurocamp, and spent some time with the international players trying to impart some of his vast knowledge of the game gleaned from a successful 16-year career in the NBA.

Divac is known as one of the great passing big men of all time, but he’s also known for bringing flopping into the NBA — if not initiating it, then certainly making it more prominent and acceptable as a way for players to gain an advantage.

The league has implemented a largely toothless anti-flopping policy in recent years, but it’s at least a start in trying to shame players into cutting down on the blatant attempts to fool the referees into making a questionable call in their team’s favor. It hasn’t had much of an effect, as we’re still seeing it go on at this late stage of the postseason.

Divac was better than anyone during his era at successfully pulling off these kinds of acting jobs, but he’s not necessarily proud of it. He’s in favor of the league trying to eliminate it from the game, but said his resorting to that strategy was simply done out of necessity.

“Whenever you overdo something, it’s time to stop it,” Divac told NBCSports.com. “So I think it’s a great decision by the NBA. But everyone is saying that’s my rule; that’s not my rule. That’s Shaq’s rule.”

Wait, you think Shaq started it?

“No, I started it because of Shaq, because they didn’t want to call fouls,” Divac said. “So that’s not my rule, that’s Shaq’s rule.”


Our interview also covered a variety of topics.

On players forcing their way out of current teams in advance of free agency (i.e., Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, and now potentially Kevin Love):

“I’m not supporting it,” Divac said. “But you can’t do anything about it. I think loyalty from all sides should have more impact — from the teams and the players. You just can’t go to [random] places. I remember when I made the decision to go to Sacramento, all my friends, even my agent, advised me not to go because they were the worst team. But I chose to take the challenge, make sure that I do something to change it. And I did.

“For me, being a champion is the way you act and the things that you do on the way to being a champion. That’s more important. Today, I can be a champion — just go and sign with the Miami Heat, and I’ll be a champion, right?”

On the ways the game has changed since he played:

“Every year it’s become more fast and physical,” Divac said. “I don’t see big men playing with their back to the basket anymore. That’s a big minus for basketball. To have an inside-outside game, it’s very important to have big men playing with their backs to the basket.”

On being traded from the Lakers to Charlotte:

“I was devastated,” Divac said. “That first week, I just didn’t know what was happening. But you know, things happen in life that you don’t have answers until later on. I think that trade actually helped me and extended my career. It was good for me, but back then I didn’t know.”

“I talked to Jerry West or Mitch Kupchak later on, I told them now, thinking about it, I would do the same thing. Because you move Vlade, you make the salary cap to get Shaq and you get Kobe. So you got Shaq and Kobe for Vlade. It’s a no-brainer.”

Was it an honor to be part of a deal involving two Hall of Famers?

“I’m not honored,” he said with a laugh. “But I would have done the same thing.”

Dan Patrick Show: Flopping too big an issue in today’s NBA

Danilo Gallinari tells players at adidas Eurocamp that they will have to earn their NBA respect

adidas Eurocamp Day 3
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Danilo Gallinari and Nicolas Batum held a question and answer session with the players at adidas Eurocamp on Tuesday, and the event covered a variety of topics. The most interesting dialogue came from Gallinari, as he explained to the players what it’s like to transition from playing in Europe to playing in the NBA.

Essentially, Gallinari told them that any respect at the NBA level has to be earned, and that professional players in the states tend to make it tough on their European counterparts.

“It’s tough for European players to go to the NBA, because you have to earn your respect,” he said. “They don’t respect you at the beginning. They say, ‘Who is this guy? He’s coming here to get our jobs.’ So you’ve got to earn the respect. From the first practice, they’re going to hit you, and do everything to make you sit on the bench (so they can) play. That’s normal.

“At the beginning it’s tough for us because you are a very good player in Europe, but you are nobody in the states. And they know you very well. They come here, they scout, they have everything. They write down your left hand, your right hand, what you do, what you don’t do. So when you get there, they have information, but that information — it can be true, or it can be not true. Once you go on the court, you’ve got to show what you did when they came to Italy (to see you).”

Gallinari also had some interesting things to say to the players about his start with the New York Knicks, and specifically about what then-head coach Mike D’Antoni told him about how he could fit in with the team’s offense.

“In my case, it was very funny because when I was in Europe, I was playing in a system where you do this, (then) you do this, and (then) you do your thing. You go in and out of the things that you do better. When I got to the states I was playing for Mike D’Antoni, and in our offensive system, every ball you catch, you’ve got to either shoot it, or do something. You’ve got to make things happen.

“For me it was very difficult in New York, because I was running up and down the court and I was not receiving the ball. After 10, 15 games I went to Mike and said, ‘What the f—? I run to the corners and I never get the ball.’  So he told me, ‘Whenever you have that ball, you have to shoot it. I don’t care. You get the ball, you shoot it, you do whatever you want. I will never say not to shoot.’ You get in that mentality, and the ball was getting to me. I was still running to the corner, but the ball was getting to me. I don’t know why.”

Now, that doesn’t exactly make D’Antoni sound like an offensive genius. But there was a lesson in there somewhere about communicating with your NBA head coach if you’re having issues, and then following his advice.

Kevin McHale teaches, talks post play at adidas Eurocamp

Kevin McHale at adidas Eurocamp

Kevin McHale was the guest speaker at adidas Eurocamp on Monday, and spent his 45-minute session with the players giving a teaching clinic on low-post play. The video clip above shows the opening five minutes or so of his lecture, where he talked about the need to fight for position to get the ball down low, and having a plan with what you want to do with the ball once you get it.

McHale said that as a player his goal was always to try to get to the middle of the paint, right above the restricted area, where he knew he could convert a jump hook over his defender at an extremely high percentage. He chastised players for not fighting hard enough to get that low-block position, and pointed out that if you receive a pass with your back to the basket 18 feet from the paint, it’s not a post-up situation — it’s a wing isolation.

McHale’s signature move as a player was the up-and-under after getting the ball in position on the low block. He said he’s constantly asked why players in today’s game don’t try to emulate it, and the answer, he said, was a simple one: Defenders don’t respect the offensive skills of the post-up player, so they never bite on the pump fake, which makes the move obsolete.

After the session was over, McHale lamented the lack of good low-post play in the NBA, while pointing out the decline has been a steady one that might be reaching an all-time high.

“It’s really odd,” McHale said, when asked why there’s such a dearth of low-post players. “I don’t know why because it’s such a valuable element of the game. I just think big guys now, there’s an infatuation with the three-point line, and like I said — you’re going to get better at what you practice. You’re going to get better at what you work at, and they all work at their perimeter games, so they’re all better at that.”

McHale implored the young players during his lecture to practice short jump hooks and shots over each shoulder on the low block, hundreds at a time, until they became automatic. He also said that the lack of development in that area is part of what’s led the NBA game away from it in recent years.

“It’s been a weird dynamic that I’ve seen over the last 20, 25 years, and it’s really kind of hitting an apex right now,” he said. “You watch the NBA, and no one’s even dropping it into the post anymore. It’s all about perimeter stuff. I’m telling you, that post right there — you don’t have to have a million moves, but if you can just get a basic couple of moves down there, you can really affect the game.”

McHale also believes that post play won’t return in force to the NBA until the players capable of playing down low make a conscious effort to develop that skill set at an early age.

“I think it’s more incumbent on the players,” he said. “It doesn’t appear to me to be a priority when you’re a 16-, 17-year-old kid. Everybody says ‘I want to shoot the three, I want to be a spread four.’ You very seldom hear guys say ‘I want to be a power post offensive guy.’ It’s hard to really say why. I can just tell you that it’s very noticeable when you watch the NBA game right now.”

The question came up of how important it was for a big man to be able to learn to pass out of a double-team in the post — a skill Lakers center Andrew Bynum has struggled to develop as he’s started to face that extra defender inside. McHale said that’ll come, but smiled when the question was asked, because it’s really the very last step to come in a competent post player’s game.

“First of all, there’s like three prongs in that thing,” he said. “One, you’ve got to get good down in the low post. Two, you’ve got to get good enough to beat your man steady. Three, they double-team you — that’s the third prong, and then you’ve got to pass out, OK?

“You learn pretty quickly, because in the NBA especially, when you start getting double-teamed a lot and when teams have success, they’ll do it every single night. Bynum a year from now will be a very good post passer. He’ll know where to go, he’ll be relaxed, he’ll read it, and pass it out. Then you’ve got murder on your hands because the guy can score down there and he can pass out. And any time two (players) guard one in our league, three have got to guard four. And three cannot guard four in the NBA, the players are too good.”

It’s no surprise McHale is passionate about skilled post play; he had a Hall of Fame career in the NBA after working so hard to develop his own. His teaching on the topic was straightforward, easy to understand, and on-point. Whether or not the young players will choose to listen remains to be seen, but McHale remains committed as ever to his principles.

“The game is won and lost in the paint,” he said.