Tag: Adidas EuroCamp

Adidas Eurocamp - Day 2

Vlade Divac in favor of NBA’s anti-flopping rules


TREVISO, Italy — Vlade Divac was the guest speaker for day two of adidas Eurocamp, and spent some time with the international players trying to impart some of his vast knowledge of the game gleaned from a successful 16-year career in the NBA.

Divac is known as one of the great passing big men of all time, but he’s also known for bringing flopping into the NBA — if not initiating it, then certainly making it more prominent and acceptable as a way for players to gain an advantage.

The league has implemented a largely toothless anti-flopping policy in recent years, but it’s at least a start in trying to shame players into cutting down on the blatant attempts to fool the referees into making a questionable call in their team’s favor. It hasn’t had much of an effect, as we’re still seeing it go on at this late stage of the postseason.

Divac was better than anyone during his era at successfully pulling off these kinds of acting jobs, but he’s not necessarily proud of it. He’s in favor of the league trying to eliminate it from the game, but said his resorting to that strategy was simply done out of necessity.

“Whenever you overdo something, it’s time to stop it,” Divac told NBCSports.com. “So I think it’s a great decision by the NBA. But everyone is saying that’s my rule; that’s not my rule. That’s Shaq’s rule.”

Wait, you think Shaq started it?

“No, I started it because of Shaq, because they didn’t want to call fouls,” Divac said. “So that’s not my rule, that’s Shaq’s rule.”


Our interview also covered a variety of topics.

On players forcing their way out of current teams in advance of free agency (i.e., Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, and now potentially Kevin Love):

“I’m not supporting it,” Divac said. “But you can’t do anything about it. I think loyalty from all sides should have more impact — from the teams and the players. You just can’t go to [random] places. I remember when I made the decision to go to Sacramento, all my friends, even my agent, advised me not to go because they were the worst team. But I chose to take the challenge, make sure that I do something to change it. And I did.

“For me, being a champion is the way you act and the things that you do on the way to being a champion. That’s more important. Today, I can be a champion — just go and sign with the Miami Heat, and I’ll be a champion, right?”

On the ways the game has changed since he played:

“Every year it’s become more fast and physical,” Divac said. “I don’t see big men playing with their back to the basket anymore. That’s a big minus for basketball. To have an inside-outside game, it’s very important to have big men playing with their backs to the basket.”

On being traded from the Lakers to Charlotte:

“I was devastated,” Divac said. “That first week, I just didn’t know what was happening. But you know, things happen in life that you don’t have answers until later on. I think that trade actually helped me and extended my career. It was good for me, but back then I didn’t know.”

“I talked to Jerry West or Mitch Kupchak later on, I told them now, thinking about it, I would do the same thing. Because you move Vlade, you make the salary cap to get Shaq and you get Kobe. So you got Shaq and Kobe for Vlade. It’s a no-brainer.”

Was it an honor to be part of a deal involving two Hall of Famers?

“I’m not honored,” he said with a laugh. “But I would have done the same thing.”

Dan Patrick Show: Flopping too big an issue in today’s NBA

Danilo Gallinari tells players at adidas Eurocamp that they will have to earn their NBA respect

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Danilo Gallinari and Nicolas Batum held a question and answer session with the players at adidas Eurocamp on Tuesday, and the event covered a variety of topics. The most interesting dialogue came from Gallinari, as he explained to the players what it’s like to transition from playing in Europe to playing in the NBA.

Essentially, Gallinari told them that any respect at the NBA level has to be earned, and that professional players in the states tend to make it tough on their European counterparts.

“It’s tough for European players to go to the NBA, because you have to earn your respect,” he said. “They don’t respect you at the beginning. They say, ‘Who is this guy? He’s coming here to get our jobs.’ So you’ve got to earn the respect. From the first practice, they’re going to hit you, and do everything to make you sit on the bench (so they can) play. That’s normal.

“At the beginning it’s tough for us because you are a very good player in Europe, but you are nobody in the states. And they know you very well. They come here, they scout, they have everything. They write down your left hand, your right hand, what you do, what you don’t do. So when you get there, they have information, but that information — it can be true, or it can be not true. Once you go on the court, you’ve got to show what you did when they came to Italy (to see you).”

Gallinari also had some interesting things to say to the players about his start with the New York Knicks, and specifically about what then-head coach Mike D’Antoni told him about how he could fit in with the team’s offense.

“In my case, it was very funny because when I was in Europe, I was playing in a system where you do this, (then) you do this, and (then) you do your thing. You go in and out of the things that you do better. When I got to the states I was playing for Mike D’Antoni, and in our offensive system, every ball you catch, you’ve got to either shoot it, or do something. You’ve got to make things happen.

“For me it was very difficult in New York, because I was running up and down the court and I was not receiving the ball. After 10, 15 games I went to Mike and said, ‘What the f—? I run to the corners and I never get the ball.’  So he told me, ‘Whenever you have that ball, you have to shoot it. I don’t care. You get the ball, you shoot it, you do whatever you want. I will never say not to shoot.’ You get in that mentality, and the ball was getting to me. I was still running to the corner, but the ball was getting to me. I don’t know why.”

Now, that doesn’t exactly make D’Antoni sound like an offensive genius. But there was a lesson in there somewhere about communicating with your NBA head coach if you’re having issues, and then following his advice.

Kevin McHale teaches, talks post play at adidas Eurocamp

Kevin McHale at adidas Eurocamp

Kevin McHale was the guest speaker at adidas Eurocamp on Monday, and spent his 45-minute session with the players giving a teaching clinic on low-post play. The video clip above shows the opening five minutes or so of his lecture, where he talked about the need to fight for position to get the ball down low, and having a plan with what you want to do with the ball once you get it.

McHale said that as a player his goal was always to try to get to the middle of the paint, right above the restricted area, where he knew he could convert a jump hook over his defender at an extremely high percentage. He chastised players for not fighting hard enough to get that low-block position, and pointed out that if you receive a pass with your back to the basket 18 feet from the paint, it’s not a post-up situation — it’s a wing isolation.

McHale’s signature move as a player was the up-and-under after getting the ball in position on the low block. He said he’s constantly asked why players in today’s game don’t try to emulate it, and the answer, he said, was a simple one: Defenders don’t respect the offensive skills of the post-up player, so they never bite on the pump fake, which makes the move obsolete.

After the session was over, McHale lamented the lack of good low-post play in the NBA, while pointing out the decline has been a steady one that might be reaching an all-time high.

“It’s really odd,” McHale said, when asked why there’s such a dearth of low-post players. “I don’t know why because it’s such a valuable element of the game. I just think big guys now, there’s an infatuation with the three-point line, and like I said — you’re going to get better at what you practice. You’re going to get better at what you work at, and they all work at their perimeter games, so they’re all better at that.”

McHale implored the young players during his lecture to practice short jump hooks and shots over each shoulder on the low block, hundreds at a time, until they became automatic. He also said that the lack of development in that area is part of what’s led the NBA game away from it in recent years.

“It’s been a weird dynamic that I’ve seen over the last 20, 25 years, and it’s really kind of hitting an apex right now,” he said. “You watch the NBA, and no one’s even dropping it into the post anymore. It’s all about perimeter stuff. I’m telling you, that post right there — you don’t have to have a million moves, but if you can just get a basic couple of moves down there, you can really affect the game.”

McHale also believes that post play won’t return in force to the NBA until the players capable of playing down low make a conscious effort to develop that skill set at an early age.

“I think it’s more incumbent on the players,” he said. “It doesn’t appear to me to be a priority when you’re a 16-, 17-year-old kid. Everybody says ‘I want to shoot the three, I want to be a spread four.’ You very seldom hear guys say ‘I want to be a power post offensive guy.’ It’s hard to really say why. I can just tell you that it’s very noticeable when you watch the NBA game right now.”

The question came up of how important it was for a big man to be able to learn to pass out of a double-team in the post — a skill Lakers center Andrew Bynum has struggled to develop as he’s started to face that extra defender inside. McHale said that’ll come, but smiled when the question was asked, because it’s really the very last step to come in a competent post player’s game.

“First of all, there’s like three prongs in that thing,” he said. “One, you’ve got to get good down in the low post. Two, you’ve got to get good enough to beat your man steady. Three, they double-team you — that’s the third prong, and then you’ve got to pass out, OK?

“You learn pretty quickly, because in the NBA especially, when you start getting double-teamed a lot and when teams have success, they’ll do it every single night. Bynum a year from now will be a very good post passer. He’ll know where to go, he’ll be relaxed, he’ll read it, and pass it out. Then you’ve got murder on your hands because the guy can score down there and he can pass out. And any time two (players) guard one in our league, three have got to guard four. And three cannot guard four in the NBA, the players are too good.”

It’s no surprise McHale is passionate about skilled post play; he had a Hall of Fame career in the NBA after working so hard to develop his own. His teaching on the topic was straightforward, easy to understand, and on-point. Whether or not the young players will choose to listen remains to be seen, but McHale remains committed as ever to his principles.

“The game is won and lost in the paint,” he said.

2012 adidas Eurocamp: Day 1 recap

Adidas Eurocamp Day 1
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Day one of adidas Eurocamp is in the books, and while several of the players showed flashes of ability throughout the opening session, the best player on the floor was Tomas Satoransky. The 6’7″ combo guard from the Czech Republic was consistent in his brilliance throughout the day, and showed off his excellent overall court vision and feel for the game in a variety of ways.

Satoransky ran the point and played off the ball equally well, and whipped the ball around the perimeter with confidence, always looking to create the best shot for his teammates. When it was his turn to score, he showcased a smooth stroke from the outside, and was able to put the ball on the floor and finish in traffic, as well. Satoransky is projected as a mid-second round pick, but that could change quickly if he continues to perform as he did on the camp’s first day.

Evan Fournier, who is the only international player projected to go in the first round of this year’s draft, did not participate in drills or any of the scrimmage games. Instead, he held a private workout in the afternoon, and looked great shooting the ball, finishing his session by draining five straight three-pointers from a good five feet beyond the NBA arc. When he was finished, Rockets director of scouting and camp director Arturas Karnisovas said with a smile, “OK, everyone. Show’s over.”

Fournier is expected to participate with the rest of the players in all activities on Monday.


Jet lag may have been a factor for some of the team executives that made it into town from the states less than 24 hours before the start of Sundays morning’s camp opening, but there was no lag at all in the early session from any of the players. By all accounts, the energy level to start things off was better than expected, especially on the defensive end of the floor, where guys were hustling, fighting through screens, and denying the ball at every turn as the first drills of the day took place. Minnesota Timberwolves assistant coach Bill Bayno, who is the camp’s coaching director and the one running the show, was pleased with the effort.

“The defense is ahead of the offense, which is good,” Bayno said, addressing the camp’s players at midcourt after the first workout, before offering some teaching advice. “How do we counteract that? We get that ball moving.”

Bayno then reminded the players that the scouts and front office personnel in attendance are looking not just for offensive or defensive skills, but for the whole package — including coachability, how players interact with their teammates, and most importantly, the ability to pay attention to the little things.

“It’s not just about scoring points,” he said. “Find the open man and play the right way.”


Nihad Djedovic plays aggressively at both ends of the floor, and isn’t afraid to mix it up with the bigs inside. The term “fearless” is a good one to describe his style of play, though he took it to multiple defenders with no real plan on more than one occasion, perhaps trying to draw some contact, but with better options open at the time. His talent is evident, however he’s a little out of control at times, and would benefit by slowing his game down just a bit until things start to click for him more consistently.

Here’s an example of Djedovic’s aggressiveness — On one possession, he tried a veteran hold from behind on a center trying to get up for a rebound, and on another, while defending the ball handler who was trying to drive baseline, he tried a two-handed push when the two were in close to try to keep the point guard from getting to the paint. Neither play went unnoticed by the officials, however, as Djedovic was whistled for fouls on each — perhaps due to the not-so-subtle, extra-fuzzy mohawk that sits atop his head.

Djedovic is currently projected as a possible late-second-round pick.


The last game of Day One featured a Eurocamp All-Star squad facing off against a U20 team from Russia, and it was by far the most competitive brand of basketball of the day. The speed and aggressiveness on both ends of the court from both teams made for an exciting game, and one that was low-scoring to begin. Eventually, however, the All-Star squad began to execute and pulled away for a 70-45 win, in large part thanks to the stellar play of Satoransky.


Some final tidbits from Day One:

– Big man Jonas Bergstedt (Denmark) got off to a slow start in early morning drills, needing some extra coaching on defensive rotations and looking a little out of sorts offensively. Apparently he just needed to warm up, because as the day progressed, he began to look like a legitimate NBA big, who could both hold his own on the low block, as well as get out in transition once a rebound is secured.

– Andrew Albicy (France) displayed excellent speed and quickness from the point guard position, along with a good handle and an above-average basketball IQ. He was able to get into the lane multiple times, and then kick it out to the open man while still in traffic, often while surrounded by multiple defenders. He’s strong, but at a listed height of just 5’10”, he’s going to have to improve his skill set even more to compensate for the lack of size if he wants to play at the NBA level.

– Olek Czyz (Poland) went hard to the rack every time he had the ball, and was able to absorb contact while scoring inside. And when the defenders were nowhere in sight, he took it strong down the lane and dunked the ball with two hands. The 6’7″, 200-pound wing looks to have a physical and promising offensive skill set.

– Overall European style observation: Defenses seem to be told to prevent the fast break at all times, if at all possible, and at any cost. Just about every time a team looked to get out in transition and showed any numbers advantage in the backcourt, a defender would reach in and commit a foul to stop the play. This philosophy seemed to be so ingrained to most players that one even committed a clear path foul in this situation during a game, just for the sake of stopping a three-on-one break before it could get started.

– Danilo Gallinari is scheduled to speak to players at the camp on Day Three, but arrived on Sunday and got in a late afternoon private workout with Nuggets assistant coach Melvin Hunt. It went pretty much as you’d imagine, with Gallo draining threes effortlessly from every spot around the arc.

Video: Players go through BAM testing at adidas Eurocamp

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As part of the evaluation process at adidas Eurocamp, players went through BAM (Basic Athletic Measurement) testing: a series of five tests which are used to gauge overall athleticism. This is the first year that Eurocamp has used BAM, and it’s an important step in further legitimizing the camp’s relevance to NBA team executives.

The inclusion of BAM is important not only because it’s considered the standard for measuring agility, jump height, and quickness, but also because it’s used at the pre-Draft camp in Chicago to measure U.S. college prospects. Teams can now compare the international players’ results to those of their counterparts in the states using the exact same tests, making it seamless for them during their evaluation process.

The first test in the video clip above measures reaction time. A player gets in a ready position, and waits for between three and eight seconds for the test to begin. Once the light goes on, the player must react and move in the direction that’s indicated, then do so again once a different light is activated. Sensors around the area measure how long it takes them to get to each spot.

Next up were two different types of vertical tests: a standing jump, then one with a running start. Players got two or three chances at it depending on performance, and the results were easily measured by seeing the highest rung that they were able to reach.

The final test shown was an agility test, where players had to slide their feet around a series of cones. They couldn’t run or turn their shoulders at an angle, or the round was disqualified, and once again sensors set up on the court were there to track the speed at which players made it around the course.

Overall, the operation is pretty high-tech. Players sign in to each station by swiping a wrist band that has a sensor in it with their name and information, and data is collected on nearby computers as it occurs in real-time. Results of the tests aren’t yet available to the public, but instead are just another tool for NBA teams to use in determining if a player might be a future fit for their particular organization.