Tag: Aaron Afflalo


The Nets are very excited to make their problems worse in free agency


Here’s the best part about all the games lost and money squandered and damage done to the game in this lockout. All the attempts to curb spending are going to end with a free agency class getting considerably more than it deserves. It has some stars in it, but the best options are either facing issues due to age, injury, or inconsistency. And your first bidder is in.

New Jersey Nets, come on down!

From the New York Post:

The players the Nets likely will pursue have been out there: Nene, Tayshaun Prince, Jamal Crawford. Then there is always the sign-and-trade route, which seems more feasible again as the new deal apparently will allow for immediate sign-and-trades like in the past.

via Nets ready to get to work on Williams, ‘going home soon’.

So a 29-year-old above-average center when you already have Brook Lopez is your best option, followed by a nearly-32-year-old small forward coming out of the worst chemistry disaster since Isiah’s Knicks and a 31-year-old pure shooter with limited defensive ability. These are the guys you’re targeting to try and convince the third best free agent in 2012 to re-sign with your team.

It’s like they looked at Travis Outlaw and said “Man, we need more of that!” The Nets cleared cap space last summer, struck out on the big names, and then turned around and gave out money to free agents who weren’t worth it. They also had some bad luck, but the reality is that they gave up a King’s ransom to get Deron Williams, and they seem to fail to understand how to build a team that Williams would want to compete with. Tayshaun Prince isn’t going to be the answer. Neither is Crawford or Nene. Making a big offer to Aaron Afflalo in restricted free agency, trying to pull in Glen Davis for a smaller deal, even adding Wilson Chandler as a secondary scorer would be a better option. If they sign Nene to a huge deal, where does that leave them for the chase for Dwight Howard?

Ah, the NBA is back, in all its hilarious, nonsensical ways

(HT: IAmAGM.com)

What the Nuggets should do when the lockout ends…

Nuggets guard Smith celebrates a three-point shot in their NBA basketball game against the Timberwolves in Denver
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This is the next installment of PBT’s series of “What your team should do when the lockout ends.” Today it’s the Denver Nuggets. You can also read up on the LakersTimberwolves and Mavericks as we start to work our way through all 30 NBA teams.


Last Season: Well that was no fun, then it was kind of fun, then it was not fun, again. The Nuggets finished 50-32 which is close to a freaking miracle considering everything they went through. The first half of the season was hijacked by the Melo trade drama, and the second half was spent trying to figure out an abundance of talent without a superstar. It finished with a disappointing loss to the Thunder in which Oklahoma City ran out to a big series lead and never really looked back. It was supposed to be a huge matchup, and instead it felt empty. But the Nuggets should be proud of what they accomplished, and how they stuck together despite all the distractions, and having to figure out what was essentially a whole new team after the trade.

Changes since we last saw the Nuggets: Well, half of them are in China now. Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but J.R. Smith, Kenyon Martin, and Wilson Chandler all seem set to head to China without an NBA-out clause. All three are free agents, and their return to Denver was questionable-to-doubtful to begin with. But without them, there are some interesting shifts if they stay in China. Smith’s spot is actually the most expendable. Danilo Gallinari can play shooting guard for certain rotations, and Denver is almost certain to re-sign Aaron Afflalo, one of the most efficient shooters in the league, from restricted free agency. Chandler’s minutes will be soaked up by Galinari and Al Harrington if the Nuggets go big, and Harrington likewise would take the minutes of Kenyon Martin. Harrington was God-awful-to-hey-pretty-good last season (there was a lot of variation within the Nuggets season if you can’t tell). The Nuggets also tinkered a bit at the draft, trading Raymond Felton for Andre Miller and a pick which became Jordan Hamilton to go along with Kenneth Faried. The big question will be Nene who will be an unrestricted free agent. Will he return to Denver or go chase a ring? Will the Nuggets have enough room under the new cap? Will we continue to ask annoying theoretical rhetoricals?

When the lockout ends, the Nuggets need to: Spend a year evaluating. If they re-sign Nene, their window is decidedly smaller, and they need to shift accordingly. But next year’s team will be driven to discover if Ty Lawson is ready to become a star in this league, if Danilo Gallinari is ready for another step forward, if George Karl can pull a young team together and make it greater than the sum of its parts without a true superstar, and what Masai Ujiri will do with the flexibility and assets afforded him. They’re not a young team all over, they’re not a veteran team all over, but they are an exceedingly talented team all over. The future’s bright for the Nuggets, but they have to hit the ground running.

They’ve got depth, with Andre Miller backing up Lawson, Gallinari’s versatility at positions, Al Harrington as a bench scorer, rookies who can contribute immediately, and capable defenders like Chris Anderson (or at least guys that can foul). But if Nene doesn’t re-sign, everything changes. They will have a gaping hole at center they’ll have to address, and the drop-off will be significant. How they’ll hande that will determine whether next season is a rebuilding year for Denver or a continuation of trying to make lightning in a bottle come together for an unlikely championship run.

NBA Playoffs: Denver tries to rediscover itself in Game 3 versus Thunder

Denver Nuggets v Oklahoma City Thunder
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The Nuggets are coming apart. They were wiped off the floor in Game 2 of a series they were supposed to be competitive in. J.R. Smith started saying J.R Smith things and now there’s a question of whether all that momentum of Game 1 was a figment of their imagination, or some fantasy concocted by those who like story lines more than actual basketball. For the Thunder, that proverbial “playoff gear?” It would appear they’ve hit it. If Game 1 showed what they could accomplish with only contributions from Russell Westbrook and Kevin Durant, Game 2 showed the danger of the Thunder at full operational capacity.

The Nuggets have to find a level of defense they haven’t really performed at all season. They were 15th in effective field goal percentage allowed, and while the numbers improved after the trade of Carmelo Anthony, they didn’t improve enough to skyrocket the team into a good defensive position. They don’t turn you over at a high rate, nor do they won the glass, with one of the lowest offensive rebounding rates in the league. The Thunder defensively haven’t been as good as last year, but they do have the fundamental principles to play playoff basketball. The  Nuggets have instead gotten away from the positive emotional tone they set down the stretch, and that’s been exacerbated by matchups.

The key for Denver is to get even contributions from all their players. They can’t afford a dip in production from player to player. No one has to be, nor can be relied upon to go off in a game, but they can’t simply disappear, either. J.R. Smith has been a no-show, and while Kenyon Martin and Birdman Anderson can’t be expected to contribute heavily, as they’re there mostly for defense in the lane, which they haven’t been great either, they have to give something.

Aaron Afflalo is expected to return for the Nuggets, and he could help, particularly with defense of James Harden, who blistered the Nuggets in Game 2. At the root of all of it, though, is emotion. The Nuggets have to feed on the home crowd and the “us against the world” approach they took after the trade. OKC is in the new position of being the favorites, up two games to none. They still need to take that attitude of fierceness, however. Slacking off and Denver will seize the opportunity. This series looks firmly in control of the Thunder. But series like this can change so quickly, they had better not leave anything to chance.

NBA Playoffs: Thunder barely outgun Nuggets


In a weekend full of high intensity, close games full of excitement, it was only fitting that the Oklahoma City Thunder and Denver Nuggets provided one last fireworks show. The game was the equivalent of some sort of bizarre video game. You have expected a mythical creature to burst through the floor and battle the players.

The Nuggets lead for the majority of the game, thanks to everything that got them to the fifth seed in the first place: ball movement, crack shooting, even scoring distribution with an attitude of “ruin all before you.” But the consistency from the Thunder was too much. If by consistency you mean Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook.

Durant had the playoff game he was unable to muster against the Lakers last year, scoring 41 points on just 22 shots, while Westbrook had 31 points on 23 shots.

It would be easy to look at the Nuggets and consider their problem down the stretch to have been that lack of a star player. Then you look across the way and see what Carmelo Anthony managed against the Knicks especially on his final possession and maybe that wasn’t the answer. The Nuggets lost, but A. they pushed the Thunder on the road in the opener and B. did so without Aaron Afflalo. The Nuggets have a lot to feel good about going forward, except the biggest question entering the series: who’s going to guard Kevin Durant?

One thing that will be apparent going forward is that Nene is an unstoppable machine-man sent from the future to destroy us all. Nene banged knees with Kendrick Perkins in the third quarter, then came back in and helped spark the run which gave the Nuggets back momentum before the final Thunder push. He finished with 22 points and 8 rebounds, but the impact was greater considering how many people he posterized in the course of the night. That the Nuggets went away from him was mind boggling.

The Thunder have to be concerned with their defense. They eventually out-ran the Nuggets, but Denver shot 51% from the field despite shooting just 25% from 3-point land after starting 3-3. They surrendered a 110 efficiency and only slightly won the four factors battle. They had enough weapons to finish off the Nuggets Sunday but Game 1 proved this is likely to be a long, brutal series, and one that is likely to wind up with a few scuffles along the way. Put simply, these teams don’t like one another.

Some notes:

  • Eric Maynor was huge off the bench for the Thunder, particularly from the perimeter, hitting two spot-up threes. With Raymond Felton struggling across the board, that’s a big swing vote for OKC. Felton did have 8 assists, but he and J.R. Smith combined for 7-19 shooting off the bench. Denver’s strength is its depth. It can’t afford to lose points off the pine.
  • Kenyon Martin took 12 shots for Denver. Yeah, we don’t know either.
  • The Nuggets went away from Gallinari late for reasons which seem to confuse beyond all reason. He was just as unguardable for the Thunder, working both off the cut and from the perimeter. Balanced offense is great, but maybe give the players playing well more opportunities?
  • Durant had 16 at the half and finished with 41. He had 22 of 25 points the Thunder scored between the third and fourth quarter. In a round of Game 1s  full of insane performances from stars, Durant may have topped them all.