All PBT’s NBA team previews in one convenient spot

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Finally, the NBA season is here.

For the past six weeks we at PBT have previewed every NBA team, looking forward to the season, and we want to give you one more chance to check them out. To make life easier for you when you want to find these at the end of the season and point out how wrong we were, this post has links to all the previews.

Enjoy.

ATLANTIC DIVISION

Boston Celtics
New York Knicks
Brooklyn Nets
Philadelphia 76ers
Toronto Raptors

CENTRAL DIVISION

Cleveland Cavaliers
Chicago Bulls
Indiana Pacers
Detroit Pistons
Milwaukee Bucks

SOUTHEAST DIVISION

Miami Heat
Charlotte Bobcats
Washington Wizards
Atlanta Hawks
Orlando Magic

NORTHWEST DIVISION
Oklahoma City Thunder
Utah Jazz
Portland Trail Blazers
Denver Nuggets
Minnesota Timberwolves

PACIFIC DIVISION
Los Angeles Clippers
Golden State Warriors
Phoenix Suns
Sacramento Kings
Los Angeles Lakers

SOUTHWEST DIVISION
San Antonio Spurs
Dallas Mavericks
Memphis Grizzlies
Houston Rockets
New Orleans Pelicans

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 preview: Houston Rockets

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Last season: There were high expectations with James Harden and Dwight Howard being paired in Houston, and the Rockets were good, but not great. Which felt like a first step or a disappointment, depending on your point of view. Make no mistake, the Rockets were a good team — 54 wins, which tied them for the four seed in the West — but the team never really seemed to form an identity. While statistically Harden and Howard were good together (+9.3 per 100 possessions when on the court together) they seemed more to play next to each other than with each other. This all came to a head when the Rockets lost in the first round of the playoffs to the Portland Trail Blazers in about the most painful way possible. Again, the Rockets had a good team and a good season, but they need to hope it’s a first step.

Signature highlight from last season: There were some James Harden game winners and great blocks by Dwight Howard, but was there any play more fun than Patrick Beverley dunking on Chris Bosh’s head?

Key player changes: It was almost a monster off-season for the Rockets, GM Daryl Morey was going to move them into contender status by grabbing Chris Bosh out of Miami to make his own big three. And he came thisclose. But then Bosh took the big payday to stay put and all the moves Morey had made to clear out cap space became holes.

Gone is some key depth: Omer Asik, Jeremy Lin and Chandler Parsons, as well as Omri Casspi and Jordan Hamilton.

In their place comes Trevor Ariza, Jason Terry, rookies Clint Capela and Nick Johnson, Ish Smith, Jeff Adrien, Joey Dorsey, and Kostas Papanikolaou.

Keys to the Rockets season:

Depth behind their stars. James Harden and Dwight Howard are elite players, but that alone doesn’t win you games, especially come the playoffs. The Rockets lost quality role players this summer and some lesser known guys are going to have to really step up for the Rockets to even match last season’s success. Trevor Ariza got paid after a big season in Washington, can he put up similar numbers again? Donatas Motiejunas has to take on a bigger front court role. Jason Terry needs to show he still has some game left. And so on down the line, the Rockets need to find depth and rotations that can work when Harden and Howard sit.

Can they improve defensively? The Rockets offense was top five in the league last season, they put up plenty of points (although Howard/Harden need to reduce their turnovers), but their defense was pedestrian. They were 12th in the NBA in points allowed per possession. Their defense didn’t really improve last season over the season before despite bringing in Howard to patrol the paint and glass. (Howard isn’t as explosive as he was back in Orlando but he’s still a very good rim protector.) They have Patrick Beverley out top, and Ariza should be a defensive upgrade over Parsons. Harden is Harden but says he’s going to work on being more focused on defense. This needs to be a team thing, not just one guy, and the scheme needs to fit the personnel. The bottom line is this is the end of the floor where improvement needs to happen.

Is Kevin McHale coaching for his job? This question circled around the Rockets during last season and this summer: Is Kevin McHale the right coach for this team? McHale is very well liked around the NBA and has done a good job as coach in Houston (they won 54 games last season, made the playoffs the year before when they probably shouldn’t have) but there are questions about his game planning and fit with this roster. Particularly the question is can he coach this team up defensively. Expectations are high and if this team doesn’t take a step forward this coming season there will be changes and coach is the most likely option (especially since this is the last year of McHale’s deal). Remember Howard can opt out in the summer of 2016 so the Rockets don’t want to take a step back, if they do they might give Howard a chance to have a say in picking a coach (something Howard didn’t feel he got in Los Angeles).

Why you should watch the Rockets: James Harden has taken a lot of criticism the past year, but the fact is he remains one of the best and most efficient scorers in the league. The man isn’t just a beard, he’s a legit No. 1 offensive option in this league and just fun to watch play.

Prediction: 50-32, which is still good but in the West nets you more like the 7 seed, which will net the Rockets another first round playoff exit. (That is unless Morey makes a big in season trade, however in season deals are a dying breed.) The expectations remain high around the Rockets and it’s hard to see how they meet them. Which means we could see far more changes next summer (and McHale back calling games for TNT).

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Phoenix Suns

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Last season: The Suns were one of the league’s pleasant surprises, racking up 48 wins and just barely missing the playoffs during a season where expectations were essentially the exact opposite. No one expected a starting lineup that featured Channing Frye, P.J. Tucker and Miles Plumlee to be capable of that much, but the team played cohesively under first-year head coach Jeff Hornacek, and with Goran Dragic playing at a level that earned him third-team All-NBA honors, along with a resurgent Gerald Green, the competent Morris twins, and half a season of Eric Bledsoe (did I get everybody?), Phoenix became a League Pass favorite early in the season.

Signature highlight from last season: The primary reason for the unexpected success the Suns experienced was their ability to play as a unit, while getting important contributions from multiple players on a nightly basis. This particular clip showcases that — Plumlee gets things started with a rejection at the rim, Frye saves the ball from going out of bounds to Bledsoe, who goes the length of the floor and absorbs the contact for the impressive and-1 finish.

Key offseason moves:

Keys to the Suns season:

The health of Eric Bledsoe: The Suns were very good with Bledsoe in the lineup last season, posting a record of 28-15 in the games he played against a 20-19 record when he was sidelined due to injury. Phoenix invested heavily in Bledsoe’s potential, inking him to a five-year deal worth $70 million this summer. The problem is that Bledsoe has had two seasons — last year in Phoenix, and 2012 with the Clippers — where he was only available for half of his team’s games. There’s no question he shined statistically when finally getting his chance to play as part of the starting lineup, posting career-best averages of 17.7 points, 4.7 rebounds and 5.5 assists in 32.9 minutes per contest. But for the Suns to improve upon last season’s success, they’ll need Bledsoe to be around for the bulk of his team’s games.

Replacing the production of Channing Frye: Frye was allowed to walk in free agency, which is fine if the Suns feel that they can replace what he does with the guys in place on the roster. It may not be as easy as it seems — Frye averaged 11.1 points and 5.1 rebounds, while shooting 37 percent from three-point distance, and starting in all 82 regular season contests. He played the stretch-four role to perfection, which helped the spacing and opened things up for Dragic and Bledsoe to get to the basket. It’s unclear where Hornacek will turn for a long-term solution here; he’s started Markieff Morris and Anthony Tolliver at times during the preseason. Morris was Sixth Man of the Year material last season, however, so the Suns might want to keep him in that role. If Tolliver can fill Frye’s shoes, it would be a huge relief for the team on the offensive end of the floor.

Living up to expectations: The Suns surprised last season, for all of the reasons mentioned above. Teams weren’t prepared for the level of execution that Phoenix brought on a game-by-game basis, and the fact that the Suns were able to get off to fast starts while their opponents got their bearings undoubtedly helped the team’s winning cause, especially during the first half of the season. Phoenix won’t be sneaking up on anyone this year, however, so playing as a good team may change things a bit if the team isn’t properly focused.

Why you should watch: Dragic and Bledsoe are one of the most exciting backcourts in the game, and the addition of another speedy guard in Isaiah Thomas may make for some dazzling lineups. Phoenix’s style is intoxicating, and when things are really clicking, this team is a joy to watch.

Prediction: The Suns are well-positioned to surpass last year’s win total and make a run at one of the final two postseason spots in the Western Conference. The addition of Thomas gives the team even more firepower off the bench, and if Plumlee and Markieff Morris continue to improve, there’s no reason Phoenix can’t continue to surprise, and make a return to the playoffs in the upcoming season.

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Golden State Warriors

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Last season: The Warriors continued their ascent under Mark Jackson – going from 23-43 to 47-35 to 51-31. Then, they fired Jackson.

Arguably, the team took a step back because it didn’t win a playoff series after upsetting the Nuggets the year prior. However, the Warriors – without an injured Andrew Bogut – pushed the Clippers, a better team than the 2012-13 Nuggets, to seven games in the first round. I’d argue Golden State improved, but so did the Western Conference.

Off the court, it was a weird year. Jackson had assistant coach Brian Scalabrine reassigned and then fired assistant Darren Erman. Questions swirled throughout the season, including during the playoffs, about Jackson’s own job security. That’s a lot of turmoil for a winning team.

Signature highlight from last season: The Warriors had more than their share of thrilling game-winning jumpers last season. I can’t pick just one two three four five, so I went with six:

Key offseason moves:

Keys to the Warriors season:

Steve Kerr hitting the ground running: On the court, the Warriors were doing well under Jackson.

Was he getting the most from the team? Maybe not, especially offensively. But the bar is high, and the players are largely the same with some small improvements on the bench.

All the pressure is on Kerr, who has no coaching experience.

Even an average offensive coach should help on that end, where Golden State ranked a surprisingly low 12th in points per possession last season. But it will be challenging for Kerr to improve the elite defense – and overall picture.

Relying on a starting lineup that works: Golden State’s starting lineup – Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Andre Iguodala, David Lee and Andrew Bogut – posted the best net-rating among the NBA’s 30 most-used lineups. Only the Trail Blazers’ starters return in tact with more playing time together last year.

The Warriors’ starters have developed chemistry. They’ve performed well. And they’re all back.

Stick with what works.

Developing and implementing a bench: On the downside of having such a well-used starting lineup is the reserves often played only with each other, and those hockey-style line changes sometimes yielded negative results.

The talent is there to better integrate the bench players with the starters and find lineups that work.

Draymond Green and Harrison Barnes are reliably solid reserve options. Signing Livingston, though he’s injured, should help. Signing Rush and Barbosa could help. If Festus Ezeli gets healthy, he’s another piece.

The Warriors can become more complete.

Forgetting about Kevin Love: The Warriors seemed to be in position to trade for Kevin Love this summer by trading Klay Thompson, but they didn’t pull the trigger. Undoubtedly, there will be times Love excels in Cleveland, and everyone around Golden State – including in the locker room – wonders whether that was a mistake. It’s human nature.

But the Warriors can’t let them overwhelm what could be a very positive season.

Klay Thompson building off a great summer: Thompson, 24, is the only Warrior starter under 26. If that already-strong unit is going to progress, the pressure is on him more than anyone to elevate his game. It’s even higher considering Golden State kept him rather than trading for Love.

Thompson excelled, especially defensively, with Team USA this summer, and that could be a breakthrough for him. He’s at least in the conversation as the NBA’s best two-way shooting guard.

Whether or not Thompson gets an extension before the Oct. 31 deadline, the Warriors have put a lot of faith in him.

Why you should watch: Stephen Curry will retire as the best shooter of all time. He probably hasn’t earned that title quite yet, but he’s on track. He can pull up from anywhere on the court – and often does.

This team has so many skilled players, and when its offense is humming – which didn’t happen enough last season – it’s really a thing of beauty.

As last season showed, the Warriors have a high defensive ceiling, as Mark Jackson put even Curry and Lee in position to succeed. I don’t expect to see that repeated, but if it happens, Golden State’s defense is a fun watch for basketball junkies.

Prediction: 46-36. Maybe Steve Kerr makes the Warriors better in the long run – maybe. But I don’t see him stepping in with no coaching experience and instantly making the team better – especially not in such a challenging Western Conference.

The Warriors have enough talent to remain dangerous, and I expect the offense to improve while the defense slips. The team could look much different while producing similar results, but such a transition usually means some short-term slippage.

ProBasketballTalk 2014-15 Preview: Los Angeles Clippers

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Last season: After adding Doc Rivers as head coach and Alvin Gentry as the lead assistant to coordinate the offense, the Clippers finished the season number one in offensive efficiency and seventh on the defensive side, thanks to a marked improvement from DeAndre Jordan on that end of the floor. L.A. finished third in the West, and overcame the distractions that the team’s former owner provided at the worst possible time to take out the Warriors in a seven-game series in the first round of the playoffs. Oklahoma City proved to be more talented in the second round, however, and eliminated the Clippers in six.

Signature highlight from last season: On a team that features the game’s best point guard and two of its more electrifying dunkers, there really is no shortage of highlight plays to choose from. And frankly, too many are worthy that could accurately describe just how devastating L.A. was offensively last season. So enjoy this mix of the team’s Top 10 plays, and if we were to single one of them out, let’s go with number five — Chris Paul uses his wizardry to navigate through multiple defenders, before lobbing a perfect pass up to DeAndre Jordan for the thunderous slam.

Key offseason moves:

Keys to the Clippers season:

Blake Griffin and Chris Paul: The Clippers two best players last year were arguably the best tandem on any team in the league. Griffin finished third in MVP voting behind only Kevin Durant and LeBron James, while Paul led the league in assists by averaging almost two more per game than his closest competition. As long as Griffin continues his evolution and Paul remains as rock solid as ever in running what was the league’s most efficient offense last season, L.A. will remain one of the elite teams in the Western Conference.

Improved front line depth: The addition of Spencer Hawes should be a big one for the Clippers this season, considering just how steep the drop-off was a year ago when looking at the team’s frontcourt positions. Griffin and Jordan played at an elite level, but once they came out of the game, the team’s identity completely changed due to a lack of reserve options. Rivers has used Hawes in a reserve role to this point in the preseason — a wise decision to have him firmly in place as a legitimate back up big that the team has been so desperately lacking, especially in the playoffs. Udoh, meanwhile, could provide defensive help in limited stretches, which would allow the team to be more consistent in its approach when the starters are getting their rest. Glen Davis and Hedo Turkoglu are options too, of course, but both played a bit last season, and the results were hit and miss.

The fifth starter: L.A. has four members of its starting lineup essentially locked in with Paul, Griffin, Jordan, and J.J. Redick. But the fifth spot is seemingly up for grabs. Jared Dudley played below expectations last season (likely due to trying to play through injury), and was subsequently traded out of town. It’s now guys like Chris Douglas-Roberts and Reggie Bullock who will attempt to fill that void, though Matt Barnes could see plenty of time there as well, just as he did last season. The team will want more consistency here than it saw a year ago, and not having to constantly scramble for starting-five production could make the unit a more cohesive one, especially defensively where the improvement is needed the most.

Why you should watch: This Clippers team features two of the league’s best players in Paul and Griffin, and a third in Jordan who can jump out of the gym. It’ll be interesting to see if the offensive principles remain now that lead assistant Alvin Gentry has moved on to a position with Steve Kerr and the Golden State Warriors, but the talent is there to entertain wildly on a nightly basis.

Prediction: Here’s where things get interesting. If the roster upgrades (especially the addition of Hawes) pay the expected dividends, and if L.A. can commit to improving on the defensive end of the floor, then there’s no reason that the team shouldn’t be right there with the rest of the elite in the Western Conference. The Spurs and the Thunder are the most pressing threats to the Clippers’ ability to reach that lofty status, but the injury to Kevin Durant may help L.A. get a bit of a head start in the standings, which could affect home court advantage in a postseason series.

That’s a long way from here, obviously, but the Clippers seemed poised to make their long-awaited leap this season. A top-two finish in the West and a trip to the Conference Finals is how things should ultimately play out in Los Angeles.