Tag: 2013 NBA draft

VCU v Wichita St.

Cody Zeller says he has no idea where he’s getting drafted either


This is about as fluid an NBA Draft as we have seen. There are a lot of role player potential picks in this draft but no likely breakout stars, which means teams aren’t “in love” with guys so much and are willing to move out or down looking for any kind of value.

Which means guys such as Indiana’s Cody Zeller have no idea where he’s going to be drafted. Zeller swung by the Dan Patrick Show on Wednesday and talked workouts — he’s had 10, but teams pretty much knew his game from college they just wanted to know more about him — and who is the best of the Zeller brothers. Who do you think he would pick?

DraftExpress has Zeller going No. 11 right now, but anywhere between 8 and 15 seems possible. Good news is if he goes to the Sixers at No. 11 he will play better this coming season than Andrew Bynum did for them last season.

PBT NBA Draft Preview: Has Shabazz Muhammad slid into a real value pick?

Shabazz Muhammad

For the next five weeks PBT will be profiling likely first-round draft picks in the upcoming NBA Draft. Tonight we look at UCLA’s star from last season.

If you looked at the early 2013 NBA draft projections that came out right after the 2012 draft, Shabazz Muhammad was in everybody’s top three. He was the college recruit that was going to save Ben Howland at UCLA and go on to be a big-time NBA player.

Things look very different a year later.

In college the weaknesses in Muhammad’s game were exposed and he couldn’t just be a bully scorer anymore. Then came the revelation in a Los Angeles Times piece that he is 20 years old, not 19. (When you play a physical game, being a high schooler a year older than everyone is a big advantage.) Right now DraftExpress has him going at No. 10.

I got to see a fair amount of him in college and Muhammad can still ball — he can score a variety of ways and he can defend, he’s high energy — but he’s seen as a rotation player on the wing (he’s 6’6”). Sometimes players like this that slide can slide too far — they go from being overvalued to undervalued. We’ll see if that’s the case here.


He can score. He’s physically strong and knows how to use that to get the shots he wants — he’s what you’d call a bully scorer in a lot of ways. He made a living in college just dominating smaller defenders and he can do that in the pros. He also runs the floor really well and can score in transition.

If he goes to a team with a strong point guard already he can be very dangerous — he can catch and shoot threes, he can cut and slash, and with that strength he finishes around the rim.

But really the best thing about him is the effort — when things are going his way (he can slack when shots don’t fall). When he’s on he doesn’t take plays off at either end. He will work hard on defense, he’s physical and he can grind. He wants to get better. He has the mentality Tom Thibodeau would love. Which is a good sign.


He’s very one-handed — he’s all left hand. That makes him easier to defend and that was already a bit of an issue. While he knows how to score he’s not a guy who can really create his own shot at the NBA level. He could be a guy taking a lot of contested runners. Again, this becomes about fit, in the right system his style of scoring would have value. But he’s not a guy you want to get in a lot of isolation situations in the NBA.

The other concern is that he’s not that athletic (solid but not explosive by NBA standards) and he’s an inch or two shorter than a handful of the threes he likely guards at the NBA. While he has the effort, is he ripe to get abused in mismatches?

There also were a number of red flags for teams — academic issues, an overbearing father, questions about how good a teammate he was. Interviews at the draft combine and at workouts will matter a lot for him; he needs to dispel all that.


Probably between five and 10 (DraftExpress says 10). Again, this is a guy I think could really thrive in the right system with the right point guard next to him. Teams such as the Wizards, the Timberwolves and the Trail Blazers (with guards who can create for him) could put Muhammad in the rotation and get some value right away.

Also remember to look at the guys who have come out of Ben Howland’s UCLA in recent years (Jrue Holiday, for example) — they look a lot better in the pros than they did in his system.

Here is the complete list of early entrants for 2013 NBA Draft

Marshall v Kentucky

The early entrant list for the NBA Draft — also known as the list of guys NBA teams want to draft — is now official. The league released it on Wednesday.

What follows is the complete list. Said list contains the guys who are going to go high and who you know — Nerlens Noel, Trey Burke, Ben McLemore, etc. — and a bunch of guys who threw their name in but are as likely to be drafted as you and me.

On the bottom is the list of international players who have thrown their hat in the ring this year, and you want to get to know guys like Dennis Schroder and Sergey Karasev because they will be picked in the first round.

Here is the list of college underclassmen who declared (in alphabetical order, followed by their college and height):

Steven Adams (Pittsburgh,7-0)
C.J. Aiken (St. Joseph’s, 6-9)
Anthony Bennett (UNLV, 6-8)
Vander Blue (Marquette, 6-4)
Lorenzo Brown (North Carolina State, 6-5)
Reggie Bullock (North Carolina, 6-7)
Trey Burke (Michigan, 6-0)
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (Georgia, 6-5)
Michael Carter-Williams (Syracuse, 6-5)
Adrien Coleman (Bethune-Cookman, 6-5)
Allen Crabbe (California, 6-6)
Dewayne Dedmon (Southern California, 7-0)
Gorgui Dieng (Louisville, 6-11)
Jamaal Franklin (San Diego State, 6-5)
Archie Goodwin, (Kentucky, 6-4)
Tim Hardaway Jr. (Michigan, 6-6)
Grant Jerrett (Arizona, 6-10)
Christian Kabongo (New Mexico State, 6-4)
Myck Kabongo (Texas, 6-1)
Shane Larkin (Miami, 5-11)
Ricky Ledo (Providence, 6-7)
Alex Len (Maryland, 7-1)
C.J. Leslie (North Carolina State, 6-9)
Nurideen Lindsey (Rider, 6-3)
Amath M’Baye (Oklahoma, 6-9)
Ray McCallum (Detroit, 6-3)
Ben McLemore (Kansas, 6-5)
Tony Mitchell (North Texas, 6-8)
Shabazz Muhammad (UCLA, 6-6)
Nerlens Noel (Kentucky, 6-10)
Victor Oladipo (Indiana, 6-5)
Kelly Olynyk (Gonzaga, 7-0)
Norvel Pelle (Los Angeles College Prep. Acad. 6-9)
Otto Porter Jr. (Georgetown, 6-8)
Marshawn Powell (Arkansas, 6-7)
Phil Pressey (Missouri, 5-11)
Andre Roberson (Colorado, 6-7)
Joshua Simmons (Spartanburg Methodist JC, 6-4)
Trevis Simpson (North Carolina-Greensboro, 6-4)
Tony Snell (New Mexico, 6-7)
Tahj Tate (Delaware State, 6-4)
John Taylor (Fresno Pacific, 6-1)
Adonis Thomas (Memphis, 6-7)
Deshaun Thomas (Ohio State, 6-7)
B.J. Young (Arkansas, 6-3)
Cody Zeller (Indiana, 6-11)

Here are the international players who declared (with the team and country they play for currently)

Alejandro Abrines , Barcelona (Spain)
Giannis Adetokunbo, Filathlitikos (Greece)
Francois Affia Ambadiang, Geoplin Slovan (Slovenia)
Nemanja Besovic, Partizan (Serbia)
Bogdan Bogdanovic, Partizan (Serbia)
Matias Bortolin, Arkadia (Austria)
Linos Chrysikopoulos, PAOK (Greece)
Laszlo Dobos, Zaragoza (Spain)
Dorde Drenovac, Biancoblu (Italy)
Viktor Gaddefors, Oknoplast Bologna (Italy)
Rudy Gobert, Cholet (France)
Mouhammadou Jaiteh, Boulogne (France)
Livio Jean-Charles, ASVEL (France)
Sergey Karasev, Triumph (Russia)
Louis Labeyrie, Paris-Levallois (France)
Raul Neto, Lagun Aro GBC (Spain)
Philipp Neumann, Brose Baskets (Germany)
Lucas Riva Nogueira, Estudiantes (Spain)
Alexandre Paranhos, Flamengo (Brazil)
Artem Pustovyi, Khimik (Ukraine)
Bogdan Radosavljevic, Bayern Muenchen (Germany)
Marko Ramljak , Zadar (Croatia)
Dario Saric, Cibona (Croatia)B
Dennis Schroder, New Yorker Phantoms (Germany)
Strahinja Stojacic, Smederevo (Serbia)
Walter Tavares, Gran Canaria (Spain)
Daniel Theis, Ratiopharm (Germany)
Janis Timma, Ventspils (Latvia)