Tag: 2012 NBA Draft

Anthony Davis

Anthony Davis will not be highest paid rookie ever


There is a rookie salary scale in the NBA that makes first round-picks very affordable for owners for the first couple years at least, and really four or five for most players. It makes the truly elite players like a Derrick Rose or Blake Griffin a real steal for the first several years they are in the league.

And traditionally each year, the No. 1 overall pick made a little bit more than the guy before him.

Until this year.

Thanks again, new NBA salary structure. From Darren Heitner at Forbes:

The new collective bargaining agreement also stipulates that Davis will not get an increase in salary compared to last year’s number one overall pick, Kyrie Irving or the prior year’s first pick, John Wall.

Typically, first round picks receive a more favorable rookie contract than the players who were picked in the same slot as them the prior year. However, Irving’s (selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers with the team’s first overall pick in 2011) slot value in his first year of his rookie deal was $4,286,900, as was the first overall slot for the year before, where John Wall, who was taken by the Washington Wizards…

Anthony Davis will not only fail to receive an increase in his rookie year salary from what Irving and Wall garnered in their respective rookie years, he will also receive less money in years two and three of his rookie contract than Wall, who was selected in the same slot two years ago. While Wall’s third year slot is $4,929,900, Anthony Davis’ will be $257,200 lower (at $4,672,700).

We should note that players have a “slotted” salary and can sign a contract up to 120 percent of that slot — and you can bet Davis (and the other top picks) will get that extra 20 percent.

And yes, Davis is still going to make good money. More than a lot of NBA players, more than you and me. But in terms of the revenue he will generate for the Hornets (not alone production on the court) he will be a great value for the Hornets for the first few years.

Kentucky title team now fills up NBA draft boards

NCAA Men's Championship Game - Kansas v Kentucky

It’s a heck of a recruiting pitch for John Calipari.

Six guys from his NCAA title team are expected to go in this NBA draft — including Anthony Davis No. 1 overall and likely four or five in the first round. It’s a ridiculous number.

This is the Kentucky Wildcats NBA draft.

And really, not just this draft — every Wildcats starter the past three years has been drafted, notes the Louisville Courier-Journal.

But this year is a special load of talent Kentucky sends to the NBA. Davis is a lock No. 1, a likely franchise player, but some scouts think Michael Kidd-Gilchrist could be the second best player — and he is a favorite of coaches who love his energy and play at both ends.

Then there’s Terrence Jones, the athletic forward who can score. There is Doron Lamb, the two guard who had a good NCAA Tournament run. Marcus Teague was the point guard who ran the show for Wildcats (and whose brother Jeff is already in the NBA). And Darius Miller could slip into the first round as well. You look at that and can easily imagine how they won an NCAA title.

But it’s wasn’t just talent.

What scouts loved about that Kentucky team was how professional — how much of an NBA-style team — they were. Guys bought into their roles and did what was best for the team, not always themselves. There was ball movement, there was a real commitment to defense (led by the long-armed Davis). These were all top high school recruits who put their egos aside for the team.

It was easy to watch Kentucky and project how these guys could fit into the NBA. Much more than most teams, where the one or two guys with NBA talent dominate play.

John Calipari — about as popular in college basketball as LeBron is in the NBA — won his first ever title with this group now entering the NBA. But there could be more. You don’t have to like how he works the system or how he’s friends with World Wide Wes (and LeBron), you don’t have to like Kentucky. But right now the guy is getting a lion’s share of the best talent and if he can keep getting them to buy into the system he’s going to keep winning.

And keep filling up NBA draft boards.

Davis heads list of NBA Draft night green room invitees

Anthony Davis

It means nothing, really. Being in the green room doesn’t impact your draft status. All it really says is that a very button down league that doesn’t want embarrassment is convinced these guys will go in the lottery.

Jonathan Givony of DraftExpress leaked the list of names of guys who got invited to the NBA Draft night green room (the holding room for television purposes). They are:

Thomas Robinson, Bradley Beal, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Harrison Barnes, Damian Lillard, Dion Waiters, Jeremy Lamb, Andre Drummond, Austin Rivers, John Henson, Tyler Zeller and Meyers Leonard.

No real surprises there, although it is possible Lamb or Leonard are there a little longer than expected.

So what big names did not make the list? Or, put another way, who is falling down the board and the league didn’t want the cameras on him? Jared Sullinger, Terrence Ross and Perry Jones III are the names that leap out. We knew Sullinger was falling, especially after his medial red flags. And teams are backing off Jones with concerns about his passion for the game and to improve.

Still, you shouldn’t read too much into this. Except for Anthony Davis, not much question there. Read whatever you want there.

Five NBA Draft sleepers to watch

Iona v Brigham Young

Admit it, this is one of your favorite parts of the NBA draft — picking out the guy nobody is watching because you think he’s got that special something. You want to find the next Isaiah Thomas. You know he can help your team. And you pull for him because you want to be right, even if he turns out to just be guy number eight on the bench. He’s your guy.

Here are five guys that might be your guy. Five sleepers. Five guys out of the lottery and down the draft board who could contribute, now or in a few years.

Scott Machado (6’2” point guard, Iona): In an up-tempo offense (or as a change-of-pace guy off the bench) he can do damage. He plays fast and fans will love him. The Brazilian is a pure point guard with fantastic court vision, some scouts say second best in this draft (behind Kendall Marshall of North Carolina). He knows how to make plays, especially in transition. He’s not a great athlete by NBA standards but he scored at a pretty good clip in college (13.6 points per game on 49.5 percent shooting). Put him in the right situation and he can thrive.

Terrence Ross (6’7” shooting guard/small forward, Washington): A sleeper because nobody watched the dreadful Pac-12 last year. He’s an excellent athlete who lives and dies by the jump shot (40 percent of his shots last season were threes) but if you close out he can blow by you. He can finish at the rim. He needs some handles, he needs some midrange game, but he has the athletic tools and could put it together. He could be at least solid and maybe special in a few years.

Darius Johnson-Odom (6’2” shooting guard, Marquette): He can flat out shoot the rock, and at the end of the day that is still the name of the game. He showed pretty well at the Nets combine workout, according to reports. He’s undersized for the two in the NBA (and he’s not a point guard) but he is strong and defends hard. He’ll be a catch-and-shoot guy in the league, but he can do a lot of damage that way.

Royce White (6’8” power forward, Iowa State): On paper he seems perfect. He has an NBA power forward’s body plus has excellent handles and passing skills. In college he played a point-forward where he led the team in points, assists and rebounds. He can score inside or out. But there are red flags — first his shot is very inconsistent. Plus, there are off-the-court legal issues, and on top of that he also has an anxiety disorder with a fear of flying. Lots of risk, could be high reward.

Tony Wroten (6’6” combo guard, Washington): Yes, another guy from the Huskies. He comes with more risk than Ross because his problem is style of play — he tends to just be out of control. He certainly has an NBA body — he’s got good size for a guard and is very athletic. He can drive the lane and finish through contact (but only with his left hand, he needs to get a right fast). He’s a good passer. But he takes bad shots and his jump shot is not at all reliable right now. He’s a project. But he has the tools to be a quality guard in this league if he can learn to make better decisions and get a steady jumper.

Report: Rockets talking with Raptors, Kings about draft trade

Daryl Morey

This really shouldn’t really be a surprise — ever since Daryl Morey took over as general manager of the Rockets they have been one of the more active teams on draft day.

Right now they pick No. 14 but they want to move up, according to ESPN.

Sources say that Houston has discussed deals with several teams in the top 10 about moving up in the draft. And the Rockets might have found two willing partners.

Although sources stressed that no deal is imminent, Sacramento (No. 5) and Toronto (No. 8) have let Houston know that their top-10 selections are available. Sources say that the Rockets, in turn, have made both of their first-round picks available (No. 14 and No. 16), but the key to any trade going through could be point guard Kyle Lowry.

The Kings have been rumored to be shopping their pick around.

If the Rockets can re-sign Goran Dragic they can afford to move Lowry, although Lowry was a borderline All-Star player until he was injured last year.

What’s interesting is ESPN reports the Rockets are after big man Andre Drummond, one of the biggest gambles in this draft. He’s a guy who could turn out to be a Serge Ibaka or maybe even poor-man’s Andrew Bynum in the paint, he has that level of skill, but he’s had serious questions about his drive and passion. He has not impressed in many workouts, according to reports. But if Morey takes him and gets a hit, he may have the second best player in this draft. But it is a big risk.