Tag: 2011 NBA Draft

Tristan Thompson

Three biggest surprises of the NBA Draft


There are always a few surprises, like that guy you drafted you thought was 21 turns out to be 26. Funny, but really that mistake by the Timberwolves was moot because Tanguy Ngombo was never going to play in the NBA.

But there were some surprises when the picks still mattered. Here are the three things that caught me off guard the most.

San Antonio Spurs take Corey Joseph at No. 29. Corey Joseph was going to get drafted, although probably in the second half of the second round, when all the guys considered more risky get taken. He is quick, he has a good shot, but he was an undersized combo guard and scouts were not that high on him. The Spurs were. In a lot of cases this is where I would say “what are they thinking?” but with the Spurs everybody suddenly asks, “what did I miss that they saw?” We’ll see how it pans out, but nobody saw this coming.

Cleveland Cavaliers take Tristan Thompson at No. 4. Make no mistake, Tristan Thompson can play. And you don’t want to put too much stock in his struggles in a couple games of the NCAA Tournament. He can block shots, rebound and you can’t teach length. But they passed over Jonas Valanciunas, Jan Vesley and other guys many teams had rated higher. This was a surprise because if you are Cleveland right now you need to take the best player, you need the talent, and nobody else had Thompson rated this highly.

New York Knicks take Iman Shumpert at No. 17. Knicks fans hate this pick. I don’t hate it, the guy is one of the best athletes in this draft so they took a calculated risk with him. Not a bad plan in a draft full of risks. But with a good wing defender like Chris Singleton and a rebounding machine like Kenneth Faried on the books, was this the best choice? Did raw athletic guy really address a need? It’s not that this pick was bad that makes it surprising, it’s who the Knicks had Shumpert ahead of on their draft board that shocks. They need defense and Singleton provides it for sure, can Shumpert?

Biyombo says current contract buyout a non-issue

Bismack Biyombo
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In the run-up to the draft, there were a lot of questions about Bismack Biyombo’s buyout from his Spanish club, and if that was going to happen (or was going to be decided by the Spanish courts).

In meeting with the Charlotte Bobcat media on Friday, Biyombo said that the buyout was not going to be an issue and he would be with the Bobcats next season (whenever that starts), according to Mike Cranston of the Associated Press.

The Bobcats had better hope so, they traded away Stephen Jackson to get in front of the Pistons and take him. It was a real high risk/high reward move by new Bobcats GM Rich Cho. And it will be three years or so before we know if it really paid off.

Six good players not drafted in the NBA

Akron v Notre Dame

The end of the second round of the NBA Draft got ridiculous.

Teams stopped trying to draft guys who could maybe make their team and help and instead drafted ludicrous reaches that they will never have to pay. Ater Majok, Tanguy Ngombo, Chukwudiebere Maduabum — these were strange choices when quality players were on the board. (Yes, I know Manu Ginobili was the No. 57 pick — but that was the Spurs and that was the one guy out of the last decade of drafts.)

Here are six guys that should have been taken instead of them. Guys who will get invited to a camp and impress (Summer League could have really helped these guys, thanks a lot lockout.) There are a lot more than six, but these are just a few as a sample.

David Lightly, 6’7” shooting guard, Ohio State: He’s got good size and he has range on his shot, hitting 42.9 percent from three this past season. He is considered solid at everything but the knock was that he exceled at nothing. He started as a Buckeye with Greg Oden and Mike Conley, some thought he could be a guy who comes in and does the little things.

Demetri McCamey, 6’3” point guard, Illinois: He is a strong, physical point guard who can drive the lane and shot 45.1 percent from three last season. He’s a guy who can pass. We get why he wasn’t drafted — even his coach called him out for off-court distractions and lack of effort — but if you’re a team looking for a talented point guard (Lakers, we’re looking at you) isn’t McCamey a decent gamble?

Ben Hansbrough, 6’3” point guard, Notre Dame: The younger brother of Pacers forward Tyler Hansbrough, Ben is a gritty, hard-nosed point guard, which makes him a good defender. He can shoot, 43.5 percent from three last season, but there were questions about his athleticism at the next level. Not the kind of guy scouts drool over, but he gets the job done.

Diante Garrett, 6’4” point guard, Iowa State: He is a guy that has shot up the boards after the season ended, when he got into workouts (starting at Portsmouth). He is big for a PG and has a quick first step, he wants to be a facilitator. Problem is he’s not a great shooter and has the reputation of being turnover prone. Don’t expect much out of him as a rookie but he was a guy who might develop.

Brad Wanamaker, 6’3” point guard, Pittsburgh: A very heady basketball player who just knows how to be a floor general. He’s physically strong and a good passer. There were concerns about his athleticism and his three point shooting, but this is a guy who can lead a team on the floor. You’re telling me some teams couldn’t use a guy like that? He deserved a better shot.

Malcolm Thomas, 6’9” power forward, San Diego State: Kawhi Leonard overshadowed him but Thomas is a smooth player and good athlete who can finish at the rim. He is long, can defend and is a good shot blocker. There are concerns about his size at the four, and he doesn’t have an offensive game outside the paint (his offense is pretty raw generally) but another guy with real potential.