Tag: 2011-12 NBA schedule

David Stern, Adam Silver

Winderman: Unveiling the key deadlines of the lockout-shortened schedule

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The traditional NBA calendar? About as useful these days as those 82-game schedules put out by the league in July.

So we made a call, since, frankly, there has been no formal word from the NBA regarding many of the annual key dates.

And this is what we have come up with, with some of the scheduling yet to be fully determined.

Roster deadline: Dec. 24, 6 p.m.

Talk about a lump of coal in the stocking. This is when teams must cut down to the 15-player regular-season roster limit. Because of luxury-tax issues, expect several teams to operate, at least at the start of the season, below the limit. And remember, while there are more liberal D-League rules regarding assignments this season, players sent down still count against the 15-player NBA team limit.

Trade deadline: As of now, March 15.

However, this merely is a date the NBA is targeting, with the date still in need of Board of Governors approval. That decision is pending. It would come with six weeks remaining in the season, an unusually late three weeks after the All-Star break.

Guarantee date: All contracts become guaranteed Feb. 10.

This is another key date for teams seeking to avoid the $70 million luxury-tax limit, as well as the $74 million luxury-tax cliff.

Start of 10-day contracts: Feb. 6.

This is when many of the players cut this week could reappear. As always, there is a limit of two 10-day contracts per player, after which they must be released or signed for the balance of the season.

Active-roster reduction: Feb. 6.

Because the quick start up from the shortened training camps, the league will allow teams to dress and play 13 players per game, instead of the traditional 12, through this date. Then, in another twist, teams may dress 13 the balance of the season, but only play 12, allowing for more in-game flexibility.

Rookie-scale extension deadline: Jan. 25.

This traditionally is before the end of the first week of the season, but this is not a traditional year.

Playoff-eligibility: Traditionally, players must be waived by March 1 to be eligible for another team’s playoff roster.

This deadline has yet to be established.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. You can follow him on Twitter at @IraHeatBeat.

Suns 2011-12 schedule leaked, no home games against Amare’s Knicks or LeBron’s Heat

New York Knicks v Phoenix Suns

The NBA is set to release its official 2011-12 schedule later this evening, during a program which will be broadcast on NBA TV at 7 p. m. ET. But one team’s schedule has leaked in its entirety, and it shows that plenty of fans won’t be happy with the way things shake out.

The Phoenix Suns’ 2011-12 schedule was obtained by Paul Coro of the Arizona Republic, and has been posted on the paper’s website. We already knew going in that not every out-of-conference team would be seen in every NBA city, and the Suns are one team that certainly seemed to get the short end of that stick.

The NBA let us know ahead of time that as far as non-conference scheduling would go, home teams could expect to play three teams two times (one home, one away), play six teams one time at home, and play six teams one time on the road. So, there will be some teams in the West who don’t host the best teams featuring the biggest stars of the East, and vice versa. The Suns? They don’t host almost any of them.

LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and the Miami Heat will not be coming to Phoenix, nor will the reigning MVP Derrick Rose be visiting with his Chicago Bulls. Dwight Howard (if indeed he remains in Orlando this season) won’t be coming to town either, and neither will the Boston Celtics.

Most importantly to Suns fans, perhaps, is the fact that Amar’e Stoudemire won’t be back for the second time as a member of the New York Knicks.

The Suns aren’t likely to be the only team affected by the schedule this way, and they won’t be the only team affected by the loss of ticket sales from the guaranteed sellouts that these star-laden teams would provide. They’re just the first example of how the shortened season is going to impact fans in most markets who will be denied the chance to see the NBA’s biggest stars play in person.

Lakers open season on back-to-back-to-back

Los Angeles Lakers Bryant walks off the court after Game 4 of the NBA Western Conference semi-final basketball playoff against the Dallas Mavericks in Dallas

In every NBA season there are what are called “scheduled losses” where some team is going to lose a game thanks to the schedule maker. If you are on your third game in four days and draw a rested Oklahoma City, you are in trouble no matter who you are.

This year there are going to be a lot of scheduled losses. Details of the NBA schedule — set to be released Tuesday at 7 p.m. (Eastern) — are starting to leak out and my legs are getting tired just reading about it.

Like the Lakers opening the season with a back-to-back-to-back — at home to Chicago, at Sacramento then back to Los Angeles to face Utah, reports the Los Angeles Times. Pretty pumped if you’re the Lakers fan who spent crazy cash to get tickets for that Utah game so you can watch the Lakers slog around on tired legs, aren’t you?

Then there is this tweet from Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo.

One league official says there are seven NBA teams that have two stretches of 5 games in 6 nights this season. Good luck with that.

Who wants to see how the Boston Celtics’ old legs look on the fifth game in six nights? Who wants to pay to see that?

That is one area the league could see backlash — in its effort to get as many games as possible in (read: rake in more revenue) they will have games so compacts as to hurt the quality of play. They are selling a weakened product.

And there are going to be a lot more “scheduled losses” this season where we can expect teams to lose basked on the schedule and not talent.

NBA to release schedule next Tuesday (Dec. 6)

Miami Heat v Dallas Mavericks - Game Five
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The schedule for this season is not up yet on NBA.com. It will not be for a few more days.

What is up though are pictures of NBA players and stories about current NBA players — things that were not on the site during the lockout. Images of current players were banned, which gave the site an odd feel. It looks like NBA.com again now, and NBA TV also is not just running classic games anymore. They are building toward a season. Finally.

NBA TV will host an NBA schedule release show next Tuesday (Dec. 6) at 7 p.m. Eastern.

This will be a 66-game schedule that will be tightly condensed, with teams playing a lot of back-to-backs and all teams playing at least one back-to-back-to-back. There will be one break for the All-Star Game in Orlando on Feb. 26.

A lot of details of the schedule will likely leak before then, but next Tuesday will be the big, official unveiling. For example, we already know four of the five Christmas Day games — Boston at New York, Miami at Dallas (so LeBron James gets to watch Dirk Nowitzki get his ring), Chicago at the Los Angeles Lakers, and the Los Angeles Clippers at Golden State. The fifth game is rumored to involve Oklahoma City as host, but nothing is confirmed yet.

It’s just good to be talking about games and schedules rather than antitrust law. And it’s good to log on to NBA.com and see current players again. As it should be.

Could the NBA’s level of play be better with fewer games?

NBA basketball spaulding

There is not going to be a full NBA season with each team playing 82 games this year.

That’s a bad thing in the “these idiots are missing games because they can’t decide how rich each side will be” kind of way.

But could it be good for the quality of basketball in the league?

The New York Times looked into this and the answer was… maybe. Depends on how many games on what kind of schedule.

“Seventy would be great,” said Jeff Van Gundy, the ESPN/ABC analyst who coached the Knicks during the 1998-99 season, which was shrunk to 50 games by a lockout. “But only if you stretched them out over the same amount of time as the 82-game season. That would eliminate almost every back-to-back situation.”

Coaches and players hate the back-to-backs, which almost always happen on the road so there is a night of travel in between. Road trips often have a four-games-in-five-nights stretch and by the end of that you can expect teams to be playing pretty sloppy ball. They would love to get rid of that condensed part of the schedule. They argue more spread out games leads to better basketball.

But after the lockout, a more condensed schedule is likely — the 1999 50-game schedule was crammed into 13 weeks and included some back-to-back-to-backs. The quality of play that season was not good as a lot of players were not in shape.

David Thorpe, director of the Pro Training Center in Florida (and friend of PBT), who has worked with a number of pro players on conditioning and technique, told the Times that if the players have to play more a condensed schedule could bring their skills and level of play up faster.

“If you jump more, you jump better,” Thorpe said. “If you shoot more, you shoot better. One reason why we see a really high level of play in May and June, when you’d think the superstars would be the most tired, is that they’re in amazing shape and challenge themselves all the time.”

It’s all kind of a moot discussion — there will not be a shortened schedule in future years. It’s about the money — both the owners and players want the television money and gate receipts from an 82 game schedule plus playoffs. You can make an argument for 70 games being better for players, but it’s not for their pocket books. And that’s really what the lockout is about