Tag: 2010 NBA Draft

What NBA Draft night meant for five teams


We just finished a season. The confetti is still stuck to Laker fans’ shoes. But one of the best things about the NBA is that immediately the slate is wiped clean and the season begins anew with the draft. And more so than any other sport, draft night can define your franchise. Even if you elect not to participate, it likely means something about who and what your team is. And Thursday night was no different for 2010-2011.

Here’s a look at five teams and what their draft night actions meant for their franchise. Their mantras, so to speak.

1. Sacramento Kings: “If you’re going to swing, swing for the fences.” The Kings had every reason to play it cool. They’ve got their franchise player, they’ve got a good core of young players. They didn’t have to take the risk that other teams weren’t willing to take. But they did. And they were rewarded with a player that many say could be the second best prospect in the draft. A willingness to go big or go home landed them not only DeMarcus Cousins, who will pair with Evans to create a frontal assault not unlike a barrage from catapults, and they then landed Hassan Whiteside who plummeted to the second. The Kings capitalized on their opportunities tonight and it paid off for them.

2. Minnesota Timberwolves: “Irrational movement is still progress.” The Wolves turned 5 beautiful, untouched picks into a marginally good small forward with a considerable, if not large, contract, and several tweener players that would have been available later in the draft than where they were selected. Wes Johnson is fine, but is he better than Cousins? Than Udoh? Than Monroe? Lazar Hayward… what? And they sent Babbitt to Portland for Martell Webster…and gave them Ryan Gomes! The Wolves’ GM got worked by a guy who was fired.

3. Oklahoma City Thunder: “Let the good times roll.” Oklahoma City could have used their cap space to aggressively pursue veterans for the young Thunder squad. And they would have overpaid. Considerably. That’s what happens to small market teams with young cores. Veterans who would be marginal elsewhere have their agents smell blood when those types of teams come calling,and the prospect of getting an impact guy turns the money into quicksand. But Sam Presti, as usual, is one step ahead. He takes on Daequan Cook, who can shoot and is cheap, nabs the 18th, and then turns around and uses the 21st and 26th to grab Cole Aldrich at 11. Aldrich could only work on specific teams that needed his size and rebounding, where he wouldn’t be pressured to produce on versatile terms. Like,oh, say, Oklahoma City.  Stunning how good some people are and aren’t at this game.

4. Memphis Grizzlies: “We are going to be screwing with our backcourt.” That’s what I take away, anyway, as someone who does happen to pull for the bumbling bears. Xavier Henry and Greivis Vasquez. The good way this would turn out is if this means they’re moving O.J. Mayo to point, slotting in X at two-guard, re-signing Rudy and all of a sudden you have long athletic scorers all over the floor. The bad way this may turn out is that they keep Conley, slot Vasquez behind him, and then deal O.J. Mayo in order to clear space enough to re-sign Gay. Effectively running in place. This is something watch as the summer gets started.

5. New Jersey: “We (heart) athletes!’ We’re going to find out very quickly if Derrick Favors is going to be good. Because really, it comes down to whether he can shoot or not. He’s athletic, whee! He’s compared to Dwight Howard because he can jump and is muscular! Whee! But he’s not Howard’s size, so it’s going to come down to whether he can do anything on the offensive end. If he can, the Nets have something special there. If not… well,  hey, at least they also got Damion James who’s also athletic. This is, after all, professional athletics. I suppose you can’t have too many athletes.

Grizzlies admit they were wrong about 2009 draft, still completely miss the point

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The Grizzlies have learned! They admitted a mistake! An NBA front office actually admitted a draft mistake! Good times are on the way! We can learn!

Or not.

The Memphis Commercial Appeal’s Geoff Calkins has an article today leading with a fine quote from the man in charge of the Grizzlies, Michael Heisley. If you thought the answer to that question was General Manager Chris Wallace, you’re looking for the “basketball teams run sensibly” class down the hall. Heisley leads the article admitting that the Grizzlies made a huge mistake in last year’s draft. Having begged the Grizzlies not to take Hasheem Thabeet, this was an especially sweet moment of closure for me and…

Wait, what?


Turns out Heisley completely glosses over the highest pick to ever be assigned to the D-League who still looks two to three years away from being able to contribute even meaningful, much less impactful minutes, and instead decides to throw the 27th overall pick DeMarre Carroll under the bus in order to praise DeJuan Blair. From the Appeal:

“We should have taken him,” Heisley said. “He was 15th on our list. But
sometimes, in the heat of the moment, you get derailed. We got swayed by
some discussions with the doctors. This year, we’re going to take the
guy who is next on our list or someone is going to have to do a very
good job explaining to me why we’re not.”

Oh, okay, I see what you’re doing there. You’re making a joke. You’re saying that instead of your big mistake last year being the drafting of a seven foot pogo stick who had to be assigned to Dakota for 10 days in order for him to start even knowing where he was on the floor with the #2 overall pick in a loaded draft, that it was really you taking a hard nosed defender with upside over a guy who 29 other teams passed on due to his considerable injury history. All of this while retaining Mike Conley. I get it. Very funny, Mike. Such a kidder.

But, of course, because the world is a cruel and dark place, Heisley is not kidding. Look, let’s be clear. Yes, passing on Blair was a mistake. He’s shown in his rookie year that provided the super-glue and duct-tape holding his major leg joint together remains intact, he can definitely contribute with fierce rebounding and tough putbacks at the NBA level. And the Grizzlies had one of the worst benches in the league last year. But then again, drafting Blair would have meant this is what the Grizzlies’ frontcourt would have looked like, in terms of viable options:

Zach Randolph,Marc Gasol, DeJuan Blair, Hasheem Thabeet, Hamed Haddadi

That’s a lot of big guys to distribute minutes to.

Now, let’s look at their real, honest to God, viable backcourt rotation:

Mike Conley (kind of, sort of), O.J. Mayo

Right, because it’s really that 27th pick that hurt you. Let’s try that last part again with any of several combinations.

Tyreke Evans, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Stephen Curry, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Brandon Jennings, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley
Darren Collison, O.J. Mayo, Mike Conley

The list goes on. I’d even throw Jonny Flynn in there.

I appreciate that Heisley is admitting that mistakes were made, which is an important part of rebuilding a relationship with your fans. But the Grizzlies continue to try very hard, and yet somehow completely miss the point. Drafting DeMarre Carroll was certainly not a brilliant move, but not because they could have had DeJuan Blair. This is all beside the fact that as Heisley says this, he’s simultaneously damaging the team’s relationship with Carroll who can still contribute (and who they’ll need if he doesn’t want to pay out the wazoo for Rudy Gay) and glossing over the fact that they had another pick in front of him!

The Grizzlies had him 15th, and passed on him at 27 . But what about selecting Sam Young at 36, after you’d just drafted a highly identical player at a position you’re loaded at? Heisley makes it sound like the low-hanging fruit was right there, they had their hand on it, and pulled it way. But the truth is they walked right back around to the fruit again, and still decided it had worms in it.

Blair has been a force for the Spurs, in very limited minutes, and while he certainly projects to an All-Star, the knees are legitimate concerns. That’s why the Grizzlies weren’t alone in passing on him. But if they’re looking in the mirror to try and learn from their mistakes, it’s not that pick that should haunt them. It’s the cavalcade of all-rookie team selections that followed immediately after the player they went with after their rare lottery luck landed them the second overall.

As usual with Memphis, the right idea is there, the execution isn’t. Close, but no cigar. And by cigar, I mean Tyreke Evans.

NBA Draft: Thunder aiming for the Pacer's No.10 pick

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Is Sam Presti magic? Does he have mutant powers of persuasion? Does he know, in fact, how to make friends and influence people? Apparently freaking so, because hours after translating the 32nd overall pick into the 18th and a three point shooting champ, the Thunder are active again.

This time, they’re looking to move the recently acquired 18, their 21st pick, and guard Eric Maynor for Indiana’s 10th overall, according to Marc Spears of Yahoo!.

So what’s their angle? Are they looking to package and move up again for Greg Monroe? Are they geared to take one of the plethora of quality athletic bigs in this draft? Who do they have their eye on?

It seems like every time we think we’ve got Presti figured out, he does something small which somehow makes his team that much better. But Maynor is a really talented player that plays an important position for the Thunder as a backup change of pace guard. Whatever it is that Presti’s angling, it better be worth it. Then again, so far, each time, it has been.

NBA draft: Xavier Henry gets a green room invite

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It’s official: Xavier Henry is a big deal. It’s still a bit of an unknown whether Henry will fit better as a 2 or 3 in the NBA, but his talent is undeniable. We’re not necessarily looking at a John Wall-esque off-the-charts prospect or one with DeMarcus Cousins’ considerable collegiate résumé, but Xavier has the look of a long-time NBAer even if he’s lacking in star power.

That’s going to end up suiting some team just fine, and if the NBA is correct in their projections for Henry’s draft spot, that team should be in the lottery. According to Jonathan Givony of Draft Express, Henry has been invited to sit in the draft night green room, typically reserved for the most high-profile of prospects. It doesn’t guarantee that Xavier goes in the top ten, but it’s now virtually certain that Henry will be a lottery selection.

NBA Draft: Kings backup plan may be Greg Monroe

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When the Kings traded Andres Nocioni and Spencer Hawes to the Sixers for Samuel Dalembert, it became pretty clear they were aiming for a big in Thursday’s draft. The question is, of course, which big?

The Sacramento Bee reports that DeMarcus Cousins is the top selection, but that if Cousins is off the board, Greg Monroe is the likely selection.

Cousins is all over the place on mock drafts across the media. He’s been shown as high as #2 overall, and as low as near double-digits. The Kings aren’t in a terrible position to try and land him at 5. Cousins is a perfect fit for the Kings, who could add rebounding and physicality in tandem with Carl Landry, and able to work with Dalembert to provide scoring and range.

Monroe is a bit trickier, and has honestly been compared to Spencer Hawes by several scouts. But the thought is that he would provide a more athletic alternative to Hawes and fit within the flow of the offense better. Plus, maybe head coach Paul Westphal won’t continually clash with him.

Monroe has a more established game and more experience than the other center prospects. Often times, draft positioning isn’t determined by best player available, but by a series of choices that result in a team going with an alternate player based on need. Monroe’s in a great position to move up in the draft if the teams ahead of the Kings aren’t scared off by Cousins’ …. well, Cousins-ness.