Tag: 2010 free agency

Magic strongly considering matching Bulls' offer for Redick

Leave a comment

The Orlando Magic must really dislike the restricted free agency system. Because there have been several times where it really seems like they’re just matching offers from other teams out of spite. Last year it was Marcin Gortat, who was frozen in place despite an offer from the Mavericks that would have given him more minutes and an opportunity to be a heavy rotation player.

This year? After the Bulls offered J.J. Redick a 3-year, $20 million deal, Magic GM Otis Smith told ESPN the Mag’s Ric Bucher that he “anticipated” matching the Bulls offer and retaining Redick, despite Orlando being considerably over the luxury tax line.

Redick has grown under Stan Van Gundy, who initially had severe hesitations about the former Duke guard. But Redick’s work on defense, consistency, and poise developed to go alongside his already tremendous perimeter shooting ability, and Redick has been a key part of the Magic’s playoff run the past two seasons.

But this is a similar case of the Magic considering matching an offer out of spite. Redick averaged over 20 minutes per game for the first time in his career last season, and still remains a cog among several components in the Magic back court. I’m not saying that the Magic should do what’s best for Redick. This isn’t college. But they should consider the amount of money they’ll be spending on a player they have no intention of starting or giving heavy minutes to. The Bulls have paid him starter money, you want him to be a backup. Seems like a simple equation.

The Magic may feel pressured to match because of the arms race going on around them. Losing any player in this free agency period means you take a step back while the rest of your Eastern competitors get significantly better, and not just the Miami Thrice.

Smith told ESPN he’ll take the full seven days allotted to consider whether or not to match the offer.

Video:The Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, and LeBron James Heat Introduction, because things haven't really gone over the top yet


Hey, you know what would be fun? If we somehow took the ridiculous spectacle of the Free Agency Summer of Doom to whole new levels. That would be fun.

And then Dan Gilbert’s music played and he came out with Mo Williams and hit them in the back of the head with a steel chair.

Also, did we have to invoke the Superman reference? Because now we’re going to have Shaq vs. Dwight Howard vs. the Miami Thrice.  For LeBron to say “it feels right” is probably a little unnecessary. “Good” would have worked. “Great” even. But “right?” Are you trying to stab Cleveland in the heart, now? 

In the same press conference, James made references to multiple championships, sparking the loudest roar of “TRY WINNING ONE FIRST” in this country’s great history. This team could have wound up as the heroes for a new generation, and instead with the way this has been handled, they’ve become villains to many. But maybe that’s fine.

Winners get to write the history books after all.

In closing, is this really happening?

What the Raptors and Cavaliers were left with in the ruins


This is going to come as little consolation, but here’s what the Cavaliers and Raptors got out of the sign-and-trade deals that ripped away their franchise players and formed one of the most powerful triumvirates in the league. Via ESPN:

The Raptors got the 2011 first round pick they traded to Miami, as well as the Heat’s own inevitably-20-plus draft pick. So basically, two first rounders and a trade exception for the top power forward free agent on the market. That said, it’s exactly what Toronto needed. They needed cap space, flexibility, and draft picks. It’s the modern rebuilding three-course meal.

The Raps now have to find a way to move one of their remaining huge contracts, preferably Bargnani or Hedo Turkoglu, not an easy task. They have to go through the same rebuilding pains as Memphis and Sacramento. But if they play their cards right, in two years they might be able to be back in contention.

Or, they can tank and possibly get Harrison Barnes next year and this whole thing starts over again.

The Cavaliers get the Heat’s first-round picks in 2013 and 2015, and the option to swap in 2012. If you’re wondering about the odd years, there’s a rule that says teams can’t trade their first round picks in consecutive years.

(As a side note, the fact that teams have to have rules to prevent them from doing potentially crushingly stupid deals does not speak to the owners’ perspective that the problem with the system is the system and not their own idiocy.)

The Cavs are in a similar situation, but if they really want to get back into the hunt, they have movable players with talent. They should hold a firesale, move ’em all. Move Jamison, Mo Williams, Deltonte West. Keep J.J. Hickson and Daniel Gibson, start over. They won’t. But that’s what they should do. Don’t make Cleveland sit through multiple years of suffering with the pain of not seeing James alongside his former teammates. Get it over with, get a high draft pick, and start over. This can be done.

But man, is it going to hurt.

LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh each leave $15 million on the table, but can opt-out after fourth year


The numbers have come out, and the Miami Thrice team-up of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh are true to their word, money was not the main thing.

Okay, it was a pretty big thing. James and Bosh are each making $110.1 million over the course of six years, with Wade making $107. It’s not like they’ll be having to live paycheck to paycheck.

But they will be leaving $15 million on the table to play together. In the first year of their contract, Bosh and James will be making $14.5 million (Wade with $14 flat), nearly two million less than what they would have made base-year at the max (in a non-sign-and-trade). They’ll each receive 10.5% raises throughout the life of the contract. But what’s most notable, as ESPN reports in their release of the numbers, is the interesting way each contract ends.

Let’s say this thing is an unmitigated disaster. The first year they struggle, and chalk it up to role players or still learning to play with each other. The second year something weird happens and they just can’t get it together or there’s an injury. And the third year they fail, once more, and again in the fourth. A colossal failure with people pointing fingers and they’re the laughing stock of the league. The most incredible part of this deal?

They can all do this whole thing again in 2014 after the fourth year.

The contract allows for opt-outs for the fifth and sixth year of the deal.


The amount of power this contract yields for the three is simply staggering. They hold an inordinate amount of power, as expected, and have the option to stay for six years if they want. If one of them were to, God forbid, suffer a severe injury that changes their career forever. They can be making $20 million plus at age 34 (Wade) or 31 (James, Bosh). But if they’re dominating the league but want a change of scenery, if jealousy rears its ugly and predictable head, they can be out there on the front line of free agency again.

Leaving the money on the table? It is staggering. You have to understand, multiple sources I spoke to within agencies and the league told me there was no way they would leave the money on the table. None. That’s not how this works. But that’s what they did.

It’s a staggering combination of brash selfishness and admirable selflessness in a pursuit of greatness. It’s staggering ego meets the sacrifice we ask of athletes. We can’t be happy with their image, despite doing exactly what we want athletes to do, sacrifice to win, because of the way it happened. It’s a conundrum of public relations. And nobody wins, except Heat fans.

That said, the pieces are in place, the agreements have been ironed out. Everyone will be watching, to see if they succeed, and many will be watching, hoping they fail. As James wrote on Twitter:

“The Road to History starts now!”

LeBron James and Chris Bosh re-up with their respective teams…before being traded to the Heat


Thumbnail image for wade_bosh-James.jpgWith a sequence of events as massive in scale as the LeBron-Bosh coup, we all knew it couldn’t be simple. Sure, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh could have each theoretically signed free agent deals outright with the Heat, but doing so would’ve likely left Miami in a painful salary cap situation despite their undeniably effective trio.

So instead, the Heat made two separate sign-and-trade deals to help secure their two incoming superstars to longer contracts that will also afford them more financial flexibility for the upcoming season.

The Heat sent two first-round picks (Miami’s lottery-protected 2011 first-round pick and a future pick that Toronto already owed to the Heat) to the Raptors in exchange for a signed Bosh, who will commit for six years rather than the maximum five the Heat could offer. Similarly, the Cavs signed James to a six-year deal in exchange for two future first-round and two second-round picks. Both the Raptors and Cavs will also acquire rather sizable trade exceptions, worth approximately $15 million each.

This is good news for Toronto and Cleveland; future draft picks may not be quite as sweet as LeBron or Bosh, but it does at least give those franchises something in return. They aren’t likely to be very high (if Miami is as good as they look today, we’re looking at the tail end of the first round), but there are still rotation players to be found that late if teams look hard enough. Plus, the huge trade exception acquired by each team could end up scoring impressive returns (Al Jefferson, anyone?).

Meanwhile the Heat have … well, I’m not sure. It’s not immediately clear how the Bosh and James’ deals will be structured, however the two of them and Dwyane Wade all took less money each year to free up room to bring in players to put around them. The details of how much has not yet leaked out. 

However, according to our own Ira Winderman, the Heat may have cleared enough room to make a reasonable offer to power forward Udonis Haslem, though Haslem hardly fits any of Miami’s most glaring needs. This team is hurting badly at center, and while highly-skilled 5s don’t typically slum it with their free agent deals (Darko Milicic nabbed $20 million over four years), one would think that Haslem money could yield a better fitting big than Udonis. Haslem is a very useful player, but he’s just not the right guy for Miami’s coin.

Plus, the Heat’s biggest problem at present is depth, and surrendering every conceivable first-rounder for the next decade isn’t going to help that. NBA rules prevent Miami from trading first-rounders in consecutive years, so it won’t kill them too much in the short-term. Still, Miami hasn’t left themselves with all that many options to acquire talent going forward. The sheer magnitude of their three stars may render that irrelevant (as well as the allure for veteran free agents to sign cheap contracts in order to play on this team), but torching future flexibility is rarely a good thing.