Author: Rob Mahoney

Boston Celtics' Pierce and Garnett react when the team was called for a technical foul against the Chicago Bulls during NBA basketball game in Chicago

Danny Ainge is still waiting for the Celtics’ identity to emerge


This we know of the 2011-2012 Boston Celtics: They’re inconsistent as hell, and “inconsistent as hell,” doesn’t quite work against the likes of the Miami Heat and Chicago Bulls. Boston has a long way to go before their championship prospects are treated with any kind of legitimacy, and the first step in that process is undoubtedly the establishment of some kind of collective identity. At the moment, it’s impossible for observers to discern exactly who these Celtics are — not because their true nature is disguised in the insanity of a lockout season, but because even the Celtics themselves are figuring out what kind of team they’re capable of becoming.

We know that the Celtics are among the league’s oldest teams. We know that Rajon Rondo’s play can be a bit erratic, that Paul Pierce is doing what he can with a slowed first step, and that Kevin Garnett doesn’t even attempt to take opponents off the dribble anymore. We know that their bench is filled with role players of varying competency, but that the Celtics as a collective unit are a bit lacking in terms of overall talent.

But we’re still determining how all of those interactive factors manifest themselves in a holistic form — how the combination of all that the Celtics are manifests itself on a day-to-day basis. We’re still waiting to see the best that these Celtics can muster, and Boston general manager Danny Ainge (per WEEI in Boston with Dennis and Callahan and via Sports Radio Interviews) is apparently waiting for that very same thing:

“Well, right now we’re, I don’t even know, we’re a seven or eight seed. That’s who we are. There’s no denying that. Every team has plunges in this sort of crazy season, so that’s who we are right now. But do I think we can be better? Yeah. We haven’t played to our capabilities yet. We haven’t been at full strength. I’m not sure who our team is honestly at this stage. So we’re waiting to see that. But we need to get to the playoffs and find out. But I’m not really afraid of who we play in the first round, or the second round. It’s going to be tough no matter who we play. And I’m not afraid of playing the best teams in the first round.”

Ainge has every reason in the world to insist that his team can play better, but in this case it’s hard to find fault in his general assessment that we haven’t seen the real Celtics just yet. Some may disagree that Boston is better than its current standing, but the flashes of truly effective basketball — which have lasted from a string of plays to entire games this season — hint at a pretty decent team that’s merely struggling to execute. That doesn’t mean that the Celtics will ever figure out a way to stabilize, but the contrast between Boston’s highs and lows has only served to accentuate both poles.

That said, I’d disagree with one particular aspect of Ainge’s assessment: we have seen the Celtics play to their capabilities thus far. It’s just been for short bursts bookended with incompetence, framed in such a way to make it more exception than rule. Boston has been both better and worse than the seventh or eighth seed this season, and though we may spend the entire campaign trying to figure out where the Celtics’ baseline really places them in the context of the Eastern Conference, prolonged inconsistency may speak more to the team’s nature than their peaks and valleys ever could.

There they stay: Framework in place to keep Kings in Sacramento


Much regarding the basketball future of the Sacramento Kings remains up in the air, but this particular Monday brought an unequaled security to the franchise, its city, and the Kings’ legions of ardent fans. According to Sam Amick of, the Monday meeting held to discuss arena funding plans in Sacramento has produced the “framework of an agreement going forward,” per Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson. Amick also reported that the Maloof family will initially contribute more than $70 million to the aforementioned funding plan, in addition to further financial contributions throughout the life of the deal.

We’re beyond the point of dissecting what sports teams mean to fans on a personal level, to communities on a collective level, and to cities on an economic level. This is a huge, huge day for every person involved in each of those tiers — from the die-hard who won’t be able to wipe that smile off of their face for the next week to the business owner who created a model dependent on the ripple benefits that having a nearby NBA team provides. This development puts the city of Seattle that much further from getting the NBA team it deserves, but in the process prevents Sacramento from becoming the next Seattle — maligned by the swift exit of their cherished club and sadly jaded by having loved and lost.

There are still countless steps between Point A and Point B, but the important thing is that Point A exists at all. The Kings’ future in Sacramento was in serious jeopardy just a few months ago, but Johnson, the Maloofs, NBA commissioner David Stern, a fervent social media campaign, and the efforts of an entire city have further rooted the Kings in the city they call home.

Blazers release Armon Johnson to clear roster spot for Joel Przybilla


The team on the cusp of contention with a full roster is typically a bad omen for some deep-reserve player or another; in their efforts to improve via trade or free agency, teams almost inevitably have to release players as a space-creating endeavor, getting nothing in return but the freedom to go about their transaction business.

Such is the case with the Portland Trail Blazers’ Armon Johnson, who from this moment on will be former Portland Trail Blazer Armon Johnson. In order to consummate the signing of free agent center Joel Przybilla, the Blazers will waive Johnson, who has played only five minutes this season and was only briefly a relevant member of Nate McMillan’s rotation last year.

The roster-clearing decision essentially came down to the release of Johnson or former No. 1 overall pick/walking NBA tragedy Greg Oden. The Blazers opted to keep Oden, but as noted by Jason Quick of The Oregonian, the decision was hardly made on the basis of hope or sentiment. Oden’s contract simply makes for better trade filler, and as the Blazers eye further improvement before the impending trade deadline, his $1.5 million deal could prove helpful in completing a transaction on financial terms. It’s horrifying what a run of bad luck and a seven-foot frame can do to a promising player and an entire franchise, but this is where Odom and the Blazers are at present: contemplating a pragmatic split in order to bolster emergency depth. The hopes for better days and careers resurrected has run its course, and if the possibility of Oden’s release alone doesn’t signal that Portland is ready to move on, I don’t know what possibly could.

As for Johnson, the 23-year-old guard sits in a curious position. According to Ben Golliver of Blazers Edge, a league source intimated that the Blazers shopped Johnson pretty aggressively at the D-League showcase, but received no interest whatsoever in their pursuit of a second-round pick in return. Considering Johnson’s minimal salary and relentless on-ball defense, one would think he would be able to latch on somewhere as a waiver candidate. Yet that reported lack of interest casts Johnson’s immediate NBA future very much into doubt; the league still has little patience for nominal point guards with minimal offensive skills, and Johnson’s inability to either score or create plays with any consistency could push him out of the league entirely for the time being.