Author: Matt Moore

Chris Mullin

Report: Warriors moving to San Francisco in 2017


The Warriors are making huge changes everywhere since Joe Lacob and Peter Guber took over two years ago. And now there’s word they could be changing zipcodes.

The move has been rumored for awhile, but the plans going forward coincides with an incident earlier this year when the Oracle crowd booed Lacob for no apparent reason during the retirement of Chris Mullin’s jersey. The San Jose Mercury News reports that the only major hiccup is parking. You have to wonder if the team will change the name back to San Francisco Warriors, which they were before the move to Oakland. It would cost to change all the merchandise, though.

Hopefully the move wont’ impact the crowd. Oracle Arena has been a madhouse for years regardless of how good or bad the team has been. You don’t want to lose that kind of atmosphere.

Two reserves for Miami and Indiana in pre-game altercation


Before Game 4 of Pacers-Heat, Juwan Howard and Lance Stephenson got into a verbal altercation.

No, that’s not the start of a joke. It actually happened. From Yahoo Sports:

Miami Heat forward Juwan Howard and Stephenson exchanged sharp words within inches of each other’s faces on the court. Stephenson, who flashed a choke sign at Heat star LeBron James in the Pacers’ Game 3 victory, had been shooting with the Pacers on one end of the floor when Howard walked past on the way to Miami’s locker room.

It was unclear which player had said something to start the jawing, but Howard was soon warning Stephenson to keep his mouth shut, as Pacers assistant coach Brian Shaw stepped between the players and nudged Howard away from the court. There didn’t appear to be any possibility that the altercation would evolve into violence, but Howard clearly had no use for Stephenson, nor his attitude.

via Juwan Howard has verbal altercation with Lance Stephenson before Game 4 – Yahoo! Sports.

Stephenson’s “choke” bit rubbed the Heat the wrong way, the Pacers apologized. Howard, the ultimate veteran, because he’s a million years old, is sticking up for his teammate. Neither player plays. This is not a big deal. But as the third quarter wraps up of Heat-Pacers, there’s been another technical on Danny Granger and David West is still getting in altercations. It’s a tough, physical series and the Pacers aren’t backing down. You have to think the odds of a fight in this series before its end are pretty high.

Lakers-Thunder Game 4: The scapegoating of Pau Gasol


Someone has to go down for this. It might as well be Pau Gasol, I suppose. Because it sure isn’t going to be Kobe Bryant.

When the Lakers lost to the Thunder Saturday night, blowing a nine-point fourth quarter lead to do down 3-1 in their Western Conference Semifinals series with OKC, it was Kevin Durant’s coming of age. It was also the equivalent of an economic breakdown for the government. The populace is angry. They demand retribution, a cause, a villain.

Pau Gasol fits that model nicely.

It was Gasol who did this in Game 4:

The Lakers blew a nine-point lead in the fourth. They couldn’t contain Kevin Durant. They couldn’t stop Russell Westbrook. And Kobe Bryant struggled against Durant’s defense. And yet…

That could pretty much be all for Gasol in Los Angeles. From the Orange County Register:

Bryant has tired to having to prop Gasol up time and again. Bryant did it often last season in pursuit of a third consecutive title on a bad knee and before Bynum was ready, offering the compelling Natalie Portman-inspired narrative that Gasol is too often the “white swan” instead of the “black swan.” Like the movie, it didn’t end well.

This season, Bryant has still believed that Gasol can come through when it matters most. Bryant’s public request that the Lakers stop dangling Gasol in the trade market was him believing Gasol needed that support to persevere. When I was comparing the very night before the March trade deadline the emerging Bynum and Bryant to the regular one-two punch of Shaquille O’Neal and Bryant, it was Bryant who digressed to say: “We still have Pau.”

Even though Gasol has been loyal and tried to stay invested in the Lakers after the aborted preseason trade for Chris Paul, it hasn’t been the same. And effective or not, no matter how much unwavering respect he has for Bryant, Gasol has also developed his own pocket of resentment for all of Kobe’s high horsing, fire breathing and string pulling in recent years.

via Kobe and Pau: It must be the end of their era | gasol, bryant, game – Sports – The Orange County Register.

Gasol absolutely vanished in the Lakers’ four-game sweep against Dallas last year, presumably because of personal problems. No such excuse this year. Gasol had just 10 points on 10 shots and five rebounds. That cannot happen in a game where the Lakers made a concerted effort to get the ball to their bigs and slow the game down. Gasol can shoot over Serge Ibaka all day, but for whatever reason, simply faded away.

Gasol was almost shipped out before the season in the CP3 trade and was relieved to get to stay. He was almost moved at the deadline, and again, was relieved to stay. But you have to think the Lakers, should they fail to come back from down 3-1, will move on and try and find Bryant a new partner in crime. It should be noted that Bryant, although brilliant for three quarters in Game 4, was 1-7 in the last five minutes. But Bryant will not be the scapegoat. It will be Gasol, it may be Mike Brown. If the Lakers can’t come back, it’s unlikely that the Lakers look anything like they did this year. And they look nothing this year like they did last.

Something weird was up with the court at Staples Saturday, but the arena says situation normal

Oklahoma City Thunder v Los Angeles Lakers - Game Three

You know those situations where you know something is wrong, but there’s no physical evidence to suggest as such? We’ve got one of those.

Saturday night during Lakers-Thunder Game 4, there was something wrong with the court. The most notable example came before the half, when Russell Westbrook, a pretty agile guy, turned to run up the floor with the half winding down, and just slipped and fell. His right leg slipped out from under him. He lay on the court for several minutes holding his hip before getting up and going to halftime. He returned and everything was OK. And if it was just that, that’s not a big deal. But Ramon Sessions flat out slipped on to his stomach in the first quarter for no apparent reason. There were multiple slips.

The natural question was to ask if the fact the arena had to be constantly flipped from Lakers court to Clippers court to L.A. Kings rink had something to do with it. The arena had to be flipped from Clippers to Lakers in the same day Saturday, a double-header due to the back to backs being played because of the compressed schedule (on account of the lockout). But arena officials deny that there were any issues with the court. Hmmm. From the Orange County Register:

The unusual number of on-court slips and spills by both the Lakers and Oklahoma City Thunder during Saturday’s Game 4 was not because of the ice rink beneath the court, according to Staples Center officials.

The ice has been there since September and there have not been any previous complaints about slipping.

Michael Roth, spokesman for Staples Center, said the referees deemed the court safe.

The referees didn’t have any complaints with the court,” Roth said. “And everything was done as usual in these circumstances.”

via Ice not to blame for unusual number of falls – Lakers blog : The Orange County Register.

So they say there was no concern. But I’ve seen players slip on a court enough to know that what was going on Saturday night was not normal slipping. It was on multiple spots on the floor, and too consistent for there to have been nothing fishy going on.

The answer here, as usual, is to blame hockey, regardless of any actual impact from the ice.

Lakers-Thunder Game 4: Kevin Durant and a new era dawning

Kevin Durant, Kobe Bryant

Things change. It’s inevitable. And on Saturday night, you have to wonder if the guard changed officially in the Western Conference, and the NBA. 103-100, Thunder over Lakers.

Kobe Bryant was the closer. The dagger. The Black Mamba. As recently as Friday night, he was the ultimate clutch weapon (as long as we’re only talking about free throws and disregarding any and all other plays). And nothing that happened 24 hours later can change, alter, or diminish his legacy of playoff greatness. He is one of the top-five NBA players of all time, and for forty-four minutes Saturday night, he was the best player on the floor. He was aggressive in driving to the rim, he was hitting absurd shots consistently, he was passing the ball to Andrew Bynum, he was rebounding, he was destroying Thabo Sefolosha, James Harden, anyone guarding him.

Then the final four minutes came. Then Kevin Durant guarded him. Then the Thunder made their comeback. Then it all changed.

Bryant was 1-6 in the final four minutes, his final bucket coming on a meaningless jumper as time ran out down 5. He shot often, he shot early, he shot Kobe shots. “Tough shots” as he described them after the game. He took rolling three-pointers. He took off-balance leaners. He took every shot that you think of as a Kobe shot. But alas, they would not fall. There will be no joy on Rodeo Drive, Mighty Kobe bricked out. Five times.

Meanwhile, Kevin Durant? When Durant missed two free throws with 2:32 remaining down 2, it looked like Durant was setting up to become the latest superstar to fail in the clutch. Instead? Durant hit a tough turnaround floater to tie the game, then nailed a monster pull-up three for the win. Throw in a Pau Gasol late turnover that his him as the scapegoat and that’s how the Lakers are down 3-1.

Can the Lakers come back from 3-1? It’s possible. But they’ve now surrendered sizeable leads in two games in the series, and despite all the adjustments, all the key shots from Steve Blake, and a long stretch where Durant was largely invisible, the Thunder have won, again. They reached into the Lakers’ chest, and pulled out their still-beating heart Saturday night, and they did it the same way Bryant has in the past, while Bryant struggled to the finish. It may not have been a changing of the guard, but it was a pretty good impression.

Durant’s calm, cool demeanor and smiling face stands in contrast to the cold anger of Bryant. He admitted after the game that he was worried what people would say about the shot after it left his hand. Bryant, on the other hand, did a long feature interview talking about how he didn’t care, and that he thought his struggles in Game 2 were amusing. Something tells me this doesn’t sound as funny.

Bryant couldn’t have done anything else, though. This is who he is, and it has worked in the past and it was working on Saturday night. The shots just didn’t fall. For Durant, they did. And now Bryant watches as the next great clutch performer (if you believe in clutch) rises on the biggest stage, while defending Bryant at the same time.

Change is cruel. But it’s also unavoidable.