Author: Matt Moore

Hawks forward Smith reacts after a shot in the first half during their game against the Celtics in Game One of their NBA Eastern Conference Playoffs basketball game in Atlanta

Possessions and You: The Atlanta Hawks


From time to time, we’ll take a look at what teams looked like on offense last year using some basic but nifty charts. Today the Atlanta Hawks.



I’ve done these before with overlays of production, but it’s difficult to get a real indication relative to usage. Points per minute? Still impacted by too many factors. Field goal percentage? Doesn’t cover the impact of drawing fouls. Points per possession is really the best way to go, but even that is rife with complications and relies on a separate definition of possession (which I won’t go into here). So instead, let’s just take a look at how the usage is mapped out, and rely on our own estimations of players and their production.

Usage is great in this context specifically because it doesn’t factor for minutes. It shows you when a player is on the floor, how many possessions he’s absorbing.

Some surprising notes:

  • Josh Smith with a higher usage rate than Joe Johnson. It shows how the team really did start to shift towards more of a Smith-centric approach last season, which is a good thing, and could help them with the transition from Joe Johnson to a more even distribution on the perimeter. Smith had more FGA and FTA last season in roughly 200 more minutes.
  • Woah there, Ivan Johnson! Johnson had an equal usage rate as Lou Williams, their primary bench scorer. Thing is, though, he was efficient, shooting 51 percent from the field. He averaged as many points per 36 minutes as starting point guard, Jeff Teague, for crying out loud. Johnson’s personal issues and locker room concerns are evident, but they still shouldn’t outweigh his production on the floor.
  • Jeff Teague has got to get more assertive. Teague has been criticized for being too passive in his approach, and this very much shows it. With Joe Johnson gone, he’s going to have to take on a bigger role. Yes, he can distribute to the shooters on the floor, but he’s got to contribute with his ability to get to the rim as well.
  • Once a Pargo, always a Pargo.
  • Don’t really care what Al Horford’s minutes are or how many games he appeared in, he’s got to have a bigger role. In 11 games last season, he had a usage rate lower than Tracy McGrady. That just cannot happen. He’s going to be the best or second-best player on the floor at all times next season and the ball has to go through him more.
  • Marvin Williams has a lot of problems, but at least he’s not a gunner. With as many opportunities as he gets, to have that kind of usage shows a level of restraint. How he does in Utah will be interesting in that regard.
  • Hinrich was beat up all last year with a lot of different injuries, so take that into consideration. But he also had one of the lowest usage rates, and is going to a team (Chicago) where he’s filling in for one of the highest usage rate guys in the league. The Bulls have Deng, Boozer, and Noah who can shoot, but there’s still going to be a lot of questions about where the actual shots are going to come from.

Hornets agree to four-year extension with Monty Williams

Monty Williams

Surviving last year with the Hornets is a pretty impressive feat for Monty Williams. Losing Chris Paul and David West, dealing with the veto debacle, having Eric Gordon perpetually injured, being drastically low on talent, the deck was stacked against Williams. But instead of the team falling apart, even though they wound up with an awful record, if you watched the Hornets, you didn’t see a team in disarray.

Getting a team without talent in the middle of a losing season to consistently come prepared to play and compete is a lot more difficult than getting a good team to play well. And yet the Hornets were ready to play every night. Under the worst circumstances, Williams did just about as good a job as possible.

And he’s being rewarded for it. From the New Orleans Times-Picayune:

Hornets Coach Monty Williams agreed to a four-year contract extension Saturday that will keep him with the team with the team through 2016. Before the agreement was reached, Williams had one year remaining on his existing deal that included a team option for a fourth year.

Saints General Manager Mickey Loomis, who also oversees the Hornets’ basketball operations, said getting Williams’ contract situation finalized was a high priority.

“He knows and we know that he’s here for the long term as we develop a young team into a championship contender,” Loomis said. “I’ve been very impressed with Monty since we purchased the team.

via New Orleans Hornets Coach Monty Williams gets four-year contract extension |

So Williams gets to build from the ground up with stable ownership and a potential superstar in Anthony Davis. Not bad for a guy that dealt with one of the worst years for any franchise the last few years. Now we’ll see if he can do as good of a job with a team that has talent and expectations as with a tank job.

Video: A reminder, the Wolves were fun, are fun, will be fun

Kevin Love

The Timberwolves shook off all the doldrums and depressing mediocrity last year. Behind Kevin Love taking yet another leap forward and Ricky Rubio living up to the loftiest of expectations, along with Rick Adelman actually getting everyone on the same page, the Wolves were running and gunning every night. They were winning games until Rubio’s injury and played exciting, dynamic basketball.

Next year, sure there are questions. Rubio has to get back completely healthy. Love has to stay engaged and not boil over with frustration if things go poorly. They have to find someone to replace Michael Beasley. OK, I was kidding about that last one.

But sine it’s been four months since we’ve seen the Timberwolves, perhaps a reminder of just how fun they are. From’s YouTube channel, here’s a great reason to look forward the Wolves’ season.