Author: Matt Moore

Josh Smith

Report: Josh Smith won’t sign an extension, Hawks can thank the new CBA


From the New York Daily News:

Josh Smith has told the Hawks that he isnt going to sign an extension during the season. Hed rather wait to become a free agent, when he can get a five-year deal. An extension would limit him to a three-year deal, according to the new CBA rules. New GM Danny Ferry has upwards of 10 players who could be free agents at seasons end

via Failure to launch … Knee injury aside, Jeremy Lin may not be what Houston Rockets bargained for – NY Daily News.

This is pretty much the inherent flaw in the new CBA. The conceptual design was to enable teams to retain their players. But instead, it’s created an environment where there’s no incentive for veteran stars to sign extensions which are limited by at least one year over what they can get in free agency, and two over what they can get by re-signing once their contracts expire.

This doesn’t mean he won’t return to the Hawks, but it definitely leaves the door open to a departure, especially when you consider that Smith has been pushing for a trade for multiple seasons. There’s been no indication from Ferry whether he considers Smith to be the focus of the Hawks’ future or whether he’d rather move him for a rebuilding package.

So, like usual, the Hawks’ situation remains in flux.

Sessions says he was worried the Lakers would trade him if he re-signed

Ramon Sessions

The Lakers didn’t want Ramon Sessions back as a free agent, at least not for what he was asking. That’s a rough thing to deal with, but they wanted to land a difference maker, they were gearing up for one more run with Kobe and Pau, and Sessions had a rough playoffs. They got Steve Nash. Not bad. But Sessions says he was reluctant to re-sign with the Lakers anyway, because of the instability of the situation and the possibility he might get traded.

“It was one of those situations I looked at like, ‘If I do come back what if they trade me?’ ” Sessions said. “There were talks about getting Deron. They always wanted the bigger-named guy. What if I get traded to a team and it’s my contract year? It was one of those things that I can’t say if I opted in, [Nash] wouldn’t have come. They still might have tried to get him. You just never know.”

via Escape from L.A.: Ramon Sessions gets fresh start with Bobcats – Yahoo! Sports.

Oh, hey there, random reference to the Lakers talking about getting Deron Williams. There were sporadic rumors in the spring, but then again, any player that is any way available, and most that aren’t, are always discussed in the context of joining the Lakers. But it’s nice to know the Lakers were aiming that high. And, honestly, it’s nice to know that they didn’t land one superstar they angled for this summer.

Sessions wants stability and he may have it in Charlotte. But they’re a rebuilding franchise. What if the pick they get next year, which will inevitably be top-five, is a point guard? There’s no getting away from it. Even now, he’s battling with Kemba Walker for the starting gig and Walker didn’t exactly set the world on fire last year. For whatever reason, there never seems to be a team willing to just commit to Sessions. He’s the NBA version of “Single Ladies.”

The Celtics may bench Brandon Bass for Jared Sullinger. Quick question: Why?

Brandon Bass

From the Boston Herald:

“I have no comment on that question. No comment,” Bass responded when asked if he cared whether he started. “We have to keep getting better as a team. I think (coach Doc Rivers) will make the best decision for the team.”

Rivers raised eyebrows earlier in the week when he speculated about employing different starting lineups. The variations could send Bass to the bench in favor of rookie power forward Jared Sullinger or free agent center Darko Milicic.

“We may go to a transitional starting lineup, you know, have three different lineups,” Rivers said Wednesday. “We put a lot of thought into it. We just will figure it out.”

via If he’s upset about role, Bass isn’t saying –

Now, I’m a pretty big fan of getting outside the box when it comes to lineups. Take two to three players of near equal value, even if one is a better scorer, and make some changes. Find what works best. Consider chemistry, and play style, and the balance of bench scoring. These are all worthy ideas.

But this is overthinking things.

Look, I get that Sullinger has looked good in preseason and maybe his knack for getting that right-side-righty layup high off the glass over a defender will maintain when he’s given the attention of starting fours. Maybe his natural physical liabilities in rebounding won’t be a problem and his hustle will simply overcome all.

It doesn’t change the fact that Brandon Bass is much, much, much better than Jared Sullinger and in particular, is at his best when Garnett is on the floor.

According to, Bass and Garnett were 9 points better than their opponent per 100 possessions last season. Now, almost everyone was +5 or better with Garnett because he was incredible last season. But Garnett and Bass provided a killer combination for Rajon Rondo. He’d run the pick and pop with one, and the other would spread out for a jumper. The could crash the boards, negating their problems with boxing out over bigger defenders, but that was largely unnecessary, because Bass and KG lead the league in unguarded jumpshot field goal percentage last year according to Synergy Sports.

With Garnett on the court last year, lineups with Bass were +176. When Bass was on the floor and KG sat, they were -18.

A 194 point differential.

I get that the Celtics need a bench scorer, particularly in the frontcourt, but they’ll have Jeff Green (don’t laugh, they believe in him) who can slide to the four if necessary. If they’re playing KG as a five in the starters, they can play Green as a four for stretches with the reserves. And the second unit provides a softer set for Sullinger to thrive in.

It’s not that Darko and Sullinger are bad players… OK, it’s not that Sullinger is a bad player, but it’s that Bass is that much better. He finally found a place in Boston where he felt he was supported and appreciated, and he re-signed with them for less money than he’d make elsewhere on shorter-term deals. The move just doesn’t seem, on surface, to make sense for anyone.

Why are the Lakers taking the ball out of Steve Nash’s hands?

Golden State Warriors v Los Angeles Lakers

When the Lakers landed Steve Nash, even before Dwight Howard, there was exultation across Lakers Land. The team would no longer need to run everything through Kobe Bryant, wouldn’t struggle getting the ball to the bigs, would have someone to quarterback, coordinate, and execute the offense. Yes, it was going to be a great new time in Hollywood. Then they added Dwight Howard! The best pick and roll point guard in the league according to Synergy Sports last year with the best pick and roll finisher last year according to the same! Genius!

And Mike Brown’s going to pretty much jack that up entirely.

In a wide-ranging piece on the Princeton offense from’s Ken Berger, Steve Nash talked about the changes that he’ll have to make in his game in the Princeton offense Mike Brown is running. Nash is more than happy to do so and supportive, even excited, but things will be different.

It was more than notable that Nash used the term “completely opposite” to describe how the Princeton offense differs from the system he’s thrived in for years.

“We have multiple post players, which I’ve never really played with,” Nash said. “You have the ability to go in a number of different directions, whereas before we really relied on pick-and-rolls. We have pick-and-roll players here, but we also have the ability to go inside or go to Kobe and other guys to score the ball.”

Even in his 17th season, Bryant, 34, remains a scoring beast who needs to be fed in isolation, especially late in the shot clock when all else has failed. And despite all their talent, the Lakers are an older team. The seven-seconds-or-less approach, whereby Nash has spent the bulk of his career wearing down opponents with the dizzying force of numerous possessions, might have tired out the Lakers first. The downside? Nash, who has thrived with the ball in his hands the vast majority of the time, will no longer be the perpetual trigger man.

“I won’t have to make all the decisions,” Nash said. “We can go inside to our big guys and allow them to make a lot of the decisions, and obviously Kobe is still going to be our go-to-guy. In some ways, I won’t have the ball in my hands all the time and I’ll be spotting up and getting open shots, so it’s going to be a little bit different.”

via Lakers’ championship hopes depend on how well things mesh – NBA – News, Scores, Stats, Fantasy Advice.

Setting aside the fact that the ball is now going into Dwight Howard who will be tasked with passing to backdoor cutters and players swinging for jumpers, which inherently means that the great passer Pau Gasol is now cutting while the great-cutting Dwight Howard is passing, am I the only one that’s wondering why in God’s name you would decide to move to a system where Steve Nash doesn’t have the ball?

This isn’t about scoring. Nash on this team could score less than ten points a game and still have the highest offensive rating and points per possession off his shots and assists in the league. It’s about the fact that for the past seven years, when Steve Nash has the ball, good things happen for your offense. Amazing things. This isn’t rocket science. Steve Nash + Ball = Good. But for some reason, the Lakers are moving in the opposite direction of that. Even with the idea that Nash is getting up there in age, offensively, he’s the least of the defense’s worries, and so he’s not going to be taking a beating. But to make the offense work, he has to have the ball.

Nash with Gasol in the pick-and-pop is such an amazing idea on its own that it’s going to get overlooked. Bryant cutting off screens for catch-and-shoot curl jumpers  could increase his field goal percentage by 5% or more. Howard and Nash on the pick and roll is a literally, and I mean literally literally, unstoppable combination without sacrificing all of your help defense, leaving Bryant or Gasol open to arguably the best passer in the game.

Why on Earth would you want to move away from that?

It’s not even about pace, it’s just about effectiveness.

The Lakers are still going to be incredible. They could run a Hawks-style isolation offense and still beat the crap out of teams. But the Princeton offense is going to leave a lot to be desired in terms of maximizing their assets. At some point you have to wonder if Mike Brown overthought how to get this super team on the road to a title. But of course, we have to wait and see. Howard’s an underrated passer, and Gasol’s versatile enough to do anything, and Nash is an incredible spot-up shooter. Maybe this works out. But conceptually, it just seems counterintuitive.

A year later, the Wolves drafting Williams still doesn’t make sense for anyone

Derrick Williams

From Canis

At some point, I think this team is just going to have to face the facts: Williams is a guy who could potentially be a pretty good power forward, on a team that has absolutely no minutes available at power forward.

It’s not like the Wolves are oblivious to this sort of thing. The reason we got Cunningham in the first place is because the team saw it had a need for a hustler/defender in the post and no minutes available for Wayne Ellington on the wings.

I like Williams, and I think he’ll have a good career as a valuable player, but I don’t see how it will happen here. He’s a stretch 4, on a team that already has one of the best, if not the best, stretch 4s in the league. With Kirilenko and Cunningham filling in the gaps around Love, how is Williams going to find space?

via What to do with Williams – Canis Hoopus.

When the Wolves landed the No.2 pick in the lottery for 2011, it was manna from heaven. Another star young player to add to their core. They were already going to be better with Ricky Rubio joining Kevin Love and later, Rick Adelman. But the problem was that the draft was considered a particularly weak one, and big-heavy at the top outside of Kyrie Irving. Picks 2-7 were all bigs, it would turn out, if you consider Williams a big.

We’re not playing revisionist history, here. This is not some “it didn’t make sense in retrospect.” At the time, everyone said ‘They have to trade the pick, right? Right?” There was rampant speculation they would move out of the lottery, and the Wolves were involved in talks repeatedly for Williams, included a speculated trade with the Lakers. But in the end, nothing developed, and the Wolves simply took the No.2 guy, Derrick Williams.

Here’s the crazy part. They drafted a good player who wound up having a decent rookie season. He didn’t blow anyone away, he didn’t establish himself outright, but then again, he was playing out of position on a team that was gunning for a playoff spot until Rubio’s injury. In maybe the most Timberwolves thing ever, they drafted a good player and still wound up making a mistake. Do you know how hard that is?

So now Williams continues to drift between two worlds, trying to establish himself, playing out of position, and not even filling the needs of the position in terms of who the Wolves are.

The Timberwolves have made a ton of good moves over the past two years, and David Kahn deserves a lot of credit for that. The Wolves are not only respectable but could be a playoff team for the first time since KG left, and that takes some doing. They’ve managed the cap and their roster well. But Williams remains the oddest situation where they drafted the best player in his range (consider that Klay Thompson and Kawhi Leonard weren’t even top ten), and isn’t a bust, and yet it was a poor pick. Here’s hoping the Wolves can move him for an upgrade at a position of need and that he gets a chance to develop in a more natural setting. It’s not that he’s not good and not developing. It’s that things could be so much better for him elsewhere.