Kurt Helin

Associated Press

Phil Jackson: The Knicks are keeping triangle offense, he wants a coach he knows

9 Comments

If you’re one of those people (and I’m in this group) who isn’t sold the triangle offense as Phil Jackson likes to run it can win titles the way the NBA is evolving, he has a question for you (us):

The rings argument is Jackson’s ultimate trump card — and he’s playing it because the Knicks are not moving away from the triangle. It’s staying, it’s going to influence their coaching search, and he would like to cut off criticism. Here are Jackson’s comments from Thursday, via Stefan Bondy of the New York Daily News.

“That’s what I was brought here for to do — build a system. That’s all part in package of what we’re doing.”

How that ties into the coaching search is you need to be one of Jackson’s guys.

“Only people I probably know will be in the interview process. I will reach out to make connections to some people. But I’ve been in this position, in the NBA over 50 years, and I’ve seen a lot of situations where coaches end up coming in without simpatico with the general manager and those things don’t work well,” he said. “So someone who has compatibility with what I do as a leader would have to be in sync with what we do.

“A lot of your speculations that people have thrown out really have very little bearing on what we do. If you want to save either paper space or speculation, limit your speculations, that’ll help out a lot.”

Kurt Rambis is still the guy Jackson wants, he feels they can work together. Jackson’s criteria means if you were dreaming of Tom Thibodeau, Scott Brooks, or Mark Jackson you can move along, it’s not happening. It does mean maybe Brian Shaw gets an interview. Jackson likely calls Luke Walton, but people around the Warriors don’t seem terribly concerned he’d go to a place he has to run the triangle.

If all this talk of the triangle and the coaching search doesn’t thrill you, know that Carmelo Anthony is in your camp. Also from the New York Daily News.

Anthony said he voiced his opinion to Phil Jackson during his exit interview Thursday – leaving “no stones unturned”… Anthony said he wants an extensive process open “to whoever would come in here and make this a better situation.”

Anthony seemed to hint if there were not a greater effort to win now, he’d consider waiving his no-trade clause to go to a contender. But that’s down the road.

Jackson is right, having a system matters — more for the role players than the stars. In Jackson’s case, the triangle didn’t make Jordan/Pippen/Kobe/Shaq great; they would have thrived regardless of the system. It mattered for guys like Paxson/Longley/Fox/Fisher far more. It matters to have a system that gets everyone on the same page and where the players fit and buy in, but a lot of systems have done that and won rings.

What the Knicks need is talent — on the court and as a coach. The best guys they can get. Talent wins in the NBA. I’m more of a fan of fitting the system to the players, especially your elite ones. Jackson is going the other way. The question becomes can he get the talent that way he needs to make the Knicks a threat? Or even a playoff team?

Rip City Return: Blazers make playoffs despite doubters

Getty Images
4 Comments

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — For the regular season finale, the Portland Trail Blazers passed out T-shirts reading “Never Doubt Rip City.”

Just in case there are still some doubters, the “never” is underlined.

The Blazers defied preseason expectations and made the playoffs, claiming the fifth seed in the Western Conference. They open their third straight postseason on Sunday in Los Angeles against the Clippers.

It’s almost as if the Blazers succeeded despite the cynics.

“One person picked as what, 15 out of 15 in the West? I mean, the list goes on. I think everybody felt disrespected, like that’s not what our season is gonna be,” guard Allen Crabbe said. “It was everybody’s goal since training camp that we were gonna play hard and it was us against everybody. Everybody stuck with that: We got better as the season went along and we had a helluva season.”

Portland was expected to reach the playoffs last season – and did – with a starting lineup that included Damian Lillard, LaMarcus Aldridge, Wesley Matthews, Nicolas Batum and Robin Lopez. But Matthews’ late-season Achilles injury messed with the team’s chemistry, and they were eliminated in the first round by a strong Memphis team.

Going into this season, the playoffs seemed a longshot.

All the starters except Lillard departed in the offseason, and coach Terry Stotts was tasked with assembling a cohesive unit around his talented point guard. One oddsmaker predicted Portland would win about 26 games.

Lillard and backcourt partner CJ McCollum went on to pace a group that finished the regular season 44-38. The Blazers won seven of their final nine games to close out the regular season.

“It’s going to be tough like it has been all season long. They’re a really good team,” Lillard said about the Clippers. “But we know that we have a chance. So we’ve got to go out there and be ourselves, lock in and be ready.”

In the finale Wednesday night against the Nuggets, a 107-99 Portland win, Lillard broke Matthews’ franchise record for 3-pointers and now has 828 for the Blazers. He averaged 25.1 points, becoming just the third Portland player to average more than 25 -along with Clyde Drexler and Kiki Vandeweghe.

“His four years here have been remarkable,” Stotts said. “He just continues to shine – sometimes you run out of words.”

McCollum averaged 20.8 points in his first year as a starter, giving Portland its first backcourt duo with an average of 20 or more points apiece in a single season.

The Clippers present an intriguing matchup with the recent return of Blake Griffin. Los Angeles won six straight before Wednesday night’s 114-105 loss at Phoenix, with the fourth seed already sewn up and Griffin, Chris Paul, DeAndre Jordan and Jamal Crawford left at home.

Whoever wins the first-round series will play the winner of the series between the defending champion Warriors and the Houston Rockets, a rematch of last year’s conference finals.

It is the first time the Clippers and Blazers are meeting in the playoffs. The Clippers won the season series against Portland 3-1.

“We’ve been underdogs since the jump,” Lillard said. “There’s no pressure on us. I’ve already seen some people talk about the Clippers and the Warriors in the second round. So there’s no pressure on us, we’ve just got to go out and play.”

League says Thon Maker is eligible for NBA Draft

Leave a comment

Thon Maker is going straight from high school to the NBA. Sort of.

The NBA is good with it, ruling Thursday that Maker met the requirements of the Collective Bargaining Agreement to be draft eligible. ESPN’s Chad Ford broke the story, since confirmed by the league.

To be draft eligible a player has to meet two requirements:

1) Be at least 19 the calendar year of the draft. Maker is already 19.

2) One NBA season had to have taken place since the player graduated from high school. Maker graduated from high school last year, but then chose to go to a prep school in Canada for a fifth year rather than go to college.

Being draft eligible and being draft ready are two different things. Maker has a lot of potential — he’s 7’1″ with a 7’3″ standing reach and he plays more like a point forward than a traditional big.

But he is raw. Not sushi raw, I mean just pulling it off the fish-hook raw, which is why teams consider him a second rounder (maybe some team takes him late in the first, but don’t bet on it). I saw Maker play in person more than a year ago at Adidas Nations, and you can see the potential in his game — he could be a big who fits with the way the NBA is trending — but he was so skinny and so incredibly raw that it was too early to say just how good he could ultimately be. When I bounced that impression off an NBA scout recently, the response was “not much has changed.”

PBT’s NBA Draft expert — and Rotoworld writer — Ed Isaacson saw Maker play far more recently and sent this analysis:

“It’s easy to see why some people instantly like him due to his size, 7’0, with an over 7’3 wingspan, as well as his the energy he plays with on the floor. Still, even though he looks like he has added some weight and strength, his frame still has a long way to go if it’s going to fill out. Even if his name has been known and lauded by many at the high school level, his game has never come close to matching the hype. Though he often has a big size advantage in the low post, he rarely dominates, especially when matched up against other high-level high school players. He can also knock down mid- and long-range jumpers, though the consistency isn’t there yet, and while Maker is a decent ballhandler for his size, he’ll often try to force drives right into the defense. Maker is at his best when he can get out in run the floor in transition, usually heading straight to the rim for a lob pass. Even if he continues to develop his skills on both ends of the floor, his understanding of the game is still way behind. He will be a project for any NBA team that picks him, and I don’t know if he’ll ever meet the early hype on him.”

NFL’s Rams, Titans delay announcing blockbuster trade because of Kobe

Associated Press
2 Comments

The Los Angeles Rams already understand the market.

For longer than Kobe Bryant has been a Laker, there has been no NFL team in Los Angeles. With that vacuum (and the fact the Dodgers had terrible ownership and stunk it up for most of that window) the Lakers owned the Los Angeles sports market. Kobe was a deity, the Lakers the top dogs.

Thursday morning, the just-returned L.A. Rams announced a blockbuster trade with the Tennessee Titans that gives the Rams the No. 1 overall pick in the draft (which they are expected to use on North Dakota State quarterback Carson Wentz). It’s huge NFL news in a market just getting used to caring about NFL news for it’s hometown team again.

The deal was agreed to Wednesday night, but the two teams decided not to announce the trade until the next day out of deference to Kobe Bryant’s farewell night, something Rams coach Jeff Fisher confirmed. This was something that other Rams officials had said earlier in the day.

Well played Rams.

Take it from a long-time Angelino, the Lakers, despite their stumbles of the past few seasons, remain the biggest draw and story in town (the Dodgers are closing that gap with Clayton Kershaw and playoff appearances). The Rams will jump up near the top quickly (their players are almost as well paid as USC’s), but Kobe is the biggest sports star in town, bar none. If the Rams had clumsily stepped on his toes, it would have been noticed.

Now we can just hope that Wentz goes on to have half the success Kobe did.

Steve Kerr enjoying the ride watching Warriors make history

1 Comment

OAKLAND, Calif. — Steve Kerr makes one thing perfectly clear: This special season is not about him. Far from it. Even if he is so perfectly entwined with the record-setting Golden State Warriors and the Chicago Bulls group Kerr played for 20 years ago that just lost its all-time wins record to the team he now leads.

Kerr will tell you he didn’t even coach the first 43 games and that record 24-0 start, after all. And he wants Luke Walton to receive the proper credit for the initial, special stretch of the season before the Warriors’ second-year coach returned Jan. 25 from a leave of absence, which began the first week of training camp in October following complications from two back surgeries.

Kerr jokes how easy he has had it this time around, with a deep lineup starring reigning MVP Stephen Curry and triple-double machine Draymond Green.

“We try to pick our spots. Over 82 games, a coach’s voice gets old quickly, so fortunately Luke coached the first (43), so they didn’t hear mine that often,” Kerr said in his usual good-natured tone. “But I think the thing we try to do is to not really worry about wins and losses. It’s more how we’re playing.”

Yet in recent weeks, Kerr faced constant questions about victories and chasing records – Golden State’s pursuit of his old 72-10 mark with the 1995-96 Bulls, to be exact. While Kerr acknowledged being uneasy about putting so much effort into a goal other than winning a championship, he relented because of his players’ desires.

Last month, he called a team meeting and asked his players if they wanted to go for the record or get some rest for the playoffs. When the majority desired to take a run at 73, Kerr agreed only with the guarantee that they would be honest with him about their health and when they needed a breather.

“He’s the coach of the year. Any time you coach a team to the record we have and the behind the scenes stuff, he’s been orchestrating everything,” guard Klay Thompson said. “He’s our head honcho and all these great ideas always flow for him. He’s really a players’ coach. He knows what we’re going through.”

Kerr played alongside Michael Jordan – “Yet another time the two of us are mentioned in the same breath. Whatever,” Kerr quipped – on the record-setting Bulls team, then his Warriors bested that mark by beating Memphis in Wednesday’s regular-season finale. Golden State hosts Houston on Saturday to start the playoffs.

Kerr played all 82 games for Chicago that season, and did so in four straight years overall – from 1993-94 through 1996-97. He takes pride in that durability and stability he brought the Bulls while winning three championships.

He went on to win two more titles as a player in San Antonio before launching a successful career off the court.

After a stint as general manager in Phoenix and then his TV work, Kerr immediately left his mark on the Bay Area. For all of those who questioned his ability with no experience, there’s no denying now that he’s a top-flight NBA coach – capturing a championship in his first season and setting the wins record in his second.

“Steve, he’s a terrific leader. This is not anything that’s new,” said New Orleans coach and former Kerr top assistant Alvin Gentry. “He’s been preparing for this for a long time. He put in so much work. I didn’t have any doubt that he was going to be a great coach.”

All the while during this exhausting, pressure-packed season, the 50-year-old Kerr tried to remain patient as he recovered from the back procedures that left him with agonizing headaches and other frustrating, debilitating physical issues. He missed practice just Tuesday for a doctor’s appointment.

Kerr still cracks jokes, smiles and constantly thinks of others – even if he regularly has to pull on an ice bag or heating pack an hour before tipoff because he’s still in pain. He wears a patch on his neck, too.

At team headquarters, Kerr welcomes coaches from all levels to practice, and recently allowed 10-year-old motivational speaker Ezra Frech – a spot-on shooter from Los Angeles with a prosthetic leg – to give a game-day pep talk.

That open-book approach has made Kerr a favorite among colleagues everywhere.

Curry appreciates how Kerr is never content. He wants to coach another champion.

From Day 1 of training camp, he challenged Golden State to do even more on the offensive end – and the unselfish, pass-happy Warriors have obliged.

“He’s got the same temperament, the same kind of passion but his IQ for the game and the adjustments they make day to day are definitely noticeable,” Curry said. “The foundation of our offense is pretty much set but in-game adjustments and plays that they call, they’ve definitely gotten smarter and it shows.”

Kerr insists he has been forced to adjust, actually.

“It’s a little tougher to deliver a message this year than last year for sure,” he said. “Last year we hadn’t won a championship and I could always play the card, `I know how to win a championship and you don’t.’ They know how to do that now and we did it together last year. It’s more of the case of me reminding them of why it’s important. It does get tougher as you go once you have won one and trying to repeat and trying to do it again and again. The message gets old. Got to find creative ways to deliver it I guess.”