Author: Kurt Helin

Coach K on Rose: “Derrick’s played great, not good, and hasn’t held anything back”


LAS VEGAS — Three days into Team USA training camp for the World Cup and the reviews are coming in on Derrick Rose — and they are glowing.

“Derrick’s played great, not good, and hasn’t held anything back,” coach Mike Krzyzewski said.

“He’s playing well,” fellow Chicagoan Anthony Davis added. “He’s playing out of his mind. He’s being Derrick Rose.”

Krzyzewski admitted he didn’t know what he was going to get out of Rose at camp, nobody did after the former MVP missed the past couple seasons following a couple of knee surgeries. But Rose has shown both some explosiveness and a more mature game, being more of a floor general than just a scorer.

“(Key) for us not to put a cap on him, just let him go, let’s see, let it out. And he’s done that, even on the defensive end,” Krzyzewski said.

On a perimeter heavy team it’s defense that is going to determine which guards will make the cut, and that is an end where Rose is using his athleticism to his advantage so far. He only tends to be on the court for short bursts of time (this is true of most of the players in the scrimmages here) but when he’s out there he’s going hard like the Derrick Rose of old.

Rose says he having fun being back on the court, he smiling more than he did in the past. He’s savoring the experience.

“This right here is just to knock off the rust and prepare me for the World Championships if I make the team, and get ready for the season if I don’t,” Rose said.

He’s even having more fun with Bulls coach and USA assistant coach Tom Thibodeau.

“Thibs cool man, he’s not yelling at me the whole time so he’s fine. Just being calm. I like this Thibs, he seems happy,” Rose said.

The USA is going to play small and fast, and that is fitting Rose well so far. We’ll see more of that in the big Team USA scrimmage on Friday night.

“Just play as hard as I can, push the ball, get people in that groove, and play defense, that’s my job,” Rose said.

Report: Lakers work out Michael Beasley

Milwaukee Bucks v Miami Heat

Somebody is going to give Michael Beasley another chance.

Miami tried last season but by the second half of the year Erik Spolestra had given up on the experiment and buried him on the bench. LeBron James was frustrated with Beasley’s focus, the latest in a long line of off-the-court distractions and issues for Beasley. The former No. 2 pick can get you a few points (and he was more efficient than you would think last season) but every other part of his game had Minnesota then Phoenix then Miami throwing in the towel on him.

Now the Lakers are considering bringing him in, as reported by Dave McMenamin of ESPN.

The Lakers had some interest in him last season.

My reaction? You can’t see it but right now I’m shrugging my shoulders.

He’s certainly not the answer in Los Angeles — and he doesn’t bring the defense they need — but there could be worse guys to bring in on a minimum deal (probably non-guaranteed). Beasley doesn’t really move the needle for the Lakers in any direction.

Notes from Team USA Camp in Las Vegas: Nobody is a fan of the FIBA balls

Kevin Durant, Chandler Parsons

LAS VEGAS — After a couple days of Team USA training camp I had a few things in my notebook, things that didn’t fit in stories, so I’ve slid them in here.

• For the practices Team USA is using the FIBA-issue balls and nobody is a fan. From Kevin Durant on down guys shake their heads when you ask about the balls and getting used to them, it’s the most animated a few guys got. These balls are much more slick and slippery than your standard NBA ball. It led to a few issues on the first day of practice and has been an adjustment for the shooters and ball handlers.

“They’re brand new and really slippery, and a lot of guys sweat a lot so a lot of sweat gets on the ball, it makes it hard to handle and shoot,” Anthony Davis said. “Once they get broken in they’ll be fine.”

For the record, pretty much everyone finished their comments with “that’s just part of the game.” But don’t confuse that with liking these balls.

• The other adjustment is the more physical style of play — referees let a lot more contact go in international ball. A few guys have driven the lane trying to draw calls that did not come. There has been a lot of staring at the refs… so like a regular NBA game.

• I mentioned this before but it is worth repeating: For two straight days now Mike Krzyzewski has ended practice with a lineup of Kyrie Irving, Stephen Curry, Paul George, Kevin Durant and Anthony Davis on the floor, and that is likely the USA’s starting five.

• With all the talent in the room guys are bringing the effort. “You can sense it,” Damian Lillard said. “Guys that don’t have a reputation for playing hard defense are picking up full court. You’ll see guys doing stuff that basically shows you they will sell themselves out for the greater good of the team.”

• Derrick Rose says he expects some down days on his road back: “I think physically, just seeing if I can hold up (with high level practices every day), just seeing if I can hold up. I know I can but just seeing how my body feels.” He added that Bulls officials are calling and texting him daily to keep tabs and see how he’s feeling (plus Tom Thibodeau is one of the Team USA assistant coaches).

• Kevin Durant on Rose: “It’s is confidence man. That’s what it’s about in this league. You experience things and you go through and you gain confidence.”

• Former Bull Kyle Korver talking about new Bull Doug McDermott: “All the expectations on him and he handled it with such class. A lot of the learning curve when you come into the NBA is learning emotionally how to deal with everything going on. He has to learn how to deal with Thibs (coach Tom Thibodeau) every day, that’s a lot.”

• Durant on if he was disappointed Blake Griffin and Kevin Love dropped out of Team USA this summer: “No. As a player you know exactly what those guys are going through. We understand. As players we understand.” I’ll add that a number of players were asked that question and responded with some variant of “we just have to go with the guys in the room.”

• Gordon Hayward on the upcoming season in Utah where they have a lot of young talent: “We’re going to learn a lot. We’re going to take our lumps but I think it will be a good, exciting year. Hopefully we can get better from last year.”

• Coach Mike Krzyzewski on whether he knew when he was recruiting Kyrie Irving to Duke if he could turn out to be this kind of special player: “Oh definitely. I kew that in high school. That’s one of the thinks I did know — there were things I didn’t know, but I knew he was destined to be a great player because he has not only ability but he has character and great intelligence.”

• DeMar DeRozan took an elbow from Klay Thompson that ended with DeRozan on the floor with a bloody nose. DeRozan was up on Thompson pressuring him out high, Thompson tried to swing his arms through holding the ball to create space and caught him clean with the elbow. There was blood on the floor, but DeRozan was fine.

Team USA going small ball, but how many bigs do they keep on the bench?

Mike Krzyzewski

LAS VEGAS — Kyrie Irving, Stephen Curry, Paul George, Kevin Durant and Anthony Davis.

For the second day in a row coach Mike Krzyzewski rolled out that five-some out as a unit for scrimmages at the end of the Team USA practice and it looked like the starting group. Behind that guys like Klay Thompson, James Harden, John Wall, Derrick Rose, Bradley Beal and a number of other guards and wing players seem to be getting long, hard looks. Chandler Parsons got run as a stretch four on Monday.

Team USA is going small. Three guard lineups with what would be an NBA three serving as an athletic stretch four.

“Everyone talks about match-ups (with big teams such as Spain), people have to match-up against us, too,” Krzyzewski said. “What you have to do is put your best 12 together and then make adjustments with the best 12. Obviously we’re not going to have 12 guards, but that’s what we’ve done. You try to get eight or nine guys that are going to be the core, then three or four guys who complement them. We’ll see how that works out.”

That small ball has worked out well the last four years with gold medals at the 2010 World Championships and the 2012 London Olympics. Remember on that London team LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony were the primary power forwards, and they overwhelmed teams with athleticism and defensive pressure. Yet a lot of talk around Team USA seems to be about the guys not here, such as Kevin Love and Blake Griffin.

“The big men we lost are not centers. We’ve never really had… well in Beijing (2008 Olympics) we did, we had Dwight Howard and Chris Bosh (back when Bosh played more in the post),” Krzyzewski said. “But since then we had Tyson (Chandler) but he didn’t play large minutes. At both the World Championships and in London (2012 Olympics) we had LeBron, Carmelo, Kevin (Love), they were the four/fives. Actually in Istanbul (2010) it was Lamar Odom, who played great, Kevin (Durant), Rudy Gay, Tyson, Kevin Love as a young guy, as a 21 year old. We’re accustomed to (playing small).”

What Team USA is trying to figure out now is who the main rotation guys will be, USA Basketball President Jerry Colangelo told ProBasketballTalk. But at some point they need to think about the bigs.

“We talk about having a core group of players, and that number could vary depending on the people you’re working with, could be eight, could be nine, and then looking for individuals who are specialists, if you will,” Colangelo said. “High energy people, three point specialists, defenders, and that will really be determined by who ends up in our core of eight or nine players.

“This is a very deep roster. We don’t have a lot of bigs, we have a lot of perimeter players, terrific guards for sure. That structure, in our case, may be you carry an extra big or two, just because of our strengths — which will be wings, and the point and the two guard — but you need to protect yourself with a couple of bigs.”

DeMarcus Cousins seems to be getting a lot of run with the main units, but Andre Drummond is making plays and getting a lot of praise from Krzyzewski. The question is fit.

“DeMarcus brings a different big man than Anthony (Davis),” Krzyzewski said. “Just like (Andre) Drummond does. And we have to see how we might incorporate that into what we’re doing.”

What team USA wants is versatility — and that includes their big men, which is why Anthony Davis is a lock.

“What you would hope to have is a roster that would be adaptable and can play against whomever the opposition would be,” Colangelo said.

Durant says 2014 USA team better than 2010 version that won gold

Image (1) durant_usa_fun-thumb-250x159-20234.jpg for post 4140

LAS VEGAS — There has been a lot of talk around Team USA about who is not at training camp. No Kevin Love. No Blake Griffin. No LaMarcus Aldridge. There’s a lack of traditional big men.

However that’s how the USA has won gold the past four years. At the London Olympics two years ago LeBron James and Carmelo Anthony were the primary power forwards. The USA has the athletes and tries to use that to their advantage — crank up the pressure defense, force turnovers and create fast break opportunities.

The level of athleticism gathered together in Las Vegas to open Team USA training camp can’t be questioned. This is a good team — Kevin Durant thinks a very good team.

“Our team is better than that 2010 team I think…” said Durant, referring to the team that won the World Championships four years ago in Turkey (FIBA has since changed the name of the event to the World Cup). But why is this group better?

“Just different guys,” Durant said. “I’m four years better. Steph (Curry) is four years better than he was on that team, we got Kyrie Irving, we got Klay Thompson, we got better players I think. It’s just a different team.

“But that 2010 team was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. I think we have a team that’s even better.”

Durant, Curry and Derrick Rose would be the only holdovers from the 2010 team (that team relied a lot on Lamar Odom as a point-forward), but Durant says that’s okay because that core group is improved.

“That four years experience is a lot,” Durant said. “I’ve been in different situations as a player these last four years. Once you see stuff you learn. You learn from your mistakes, you can tell someone else and help them learn.”

Durant is being asked to play a stretch four for Team USA this summer, something he admitted has been an adjustment the first couple days because it puts him in different spots on the floor than he’s used to.

“That’s all I’ve been playing here and it’s difficult, I’m used to playing the three and spacing a lot,” Durant said. “Now I’m setting screens and rolling, kind of initiating my offense from the top and swinging the ball. Just trying to be a guy who can space the floor, shoot it when I get it also be a decoy as well —we got so many good players and you gotta guard everybody.”

And that’s the key to the USA — all 12 guys on this roster still will be elite NBA players. No other nation can roll out that kind of depth and athleticism, that depth of shooters. If the team buys into the system and is selfless, they would be almost impossible to beat.

And maybe they would be better than the 2010 team. But they have a lot way to go to prove it, it’s still a long road to gold.