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Why didn’t Allen Iverson lift weights during career? “That s— was too heavy”

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Do I really need to get into how Allen Iverson wasn’t all about practice? When the lights came on for game night, nobody ever played harder and with more passion. But practice?

Iverson was honored by the Sixers Friday night for entering the Hall of Fame — Dr. J was there to put on the jacket at mid-court at halftime — however, in a pregame interview Iverson was asked about his workout program during his career. He was not exactly a weightlifter, and his reasoning behind it was perfect Iverson.

Long live Allen Iverson.

John Wall is just so fast end-to-end (VIDEO)

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There are few — if any — players in the NBA faster end-to-end with the ball than John Wall. It’s taken him years to learn how to change up that speed and use it better, but nobody questions his top end.

Watch how the Pistons players see what is coming but just do not adapt to his speed, Wall just blows by them all for the slam.

It was close after one but heading late into the game the Wizards had a comfortable lead.

Jason Terry on player rest: “You had all summer to rest”

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There is no refuting the science: The 82-game NBA schedule wears players down physically, and when they are worn down they both do not play as well and are more susceptible to injury. This applies especially to back-to-backs and four games in five nights.

But we live in an age where proof doesn’t matter if you don’t want to believe it.

Enter Jason Terry. The old-school NBA veteran and current Milwaukee Buck was on his weekly SiriusXM Radio show, “The Runway” with co-host Justin Termine, and he railed against players getting rested this early in the season.

“Rest?  Who wants to rest?  Who wants to sit out of games?  Practice, maybe yes, ok I get it.  But the games?  No, no, no, no.  What did A.I. say?  Not the game, not the game I love.  No, we’re not going to rest.  I can see maybe in April, it’s the last week, last two weeks, you already clinched your playoff positioning, there’s nothing really to play for, yeah, we may rest a little bit. … This is the second month of the season, there’s no reason to rest.  You had all summer to rest….

And guys rest in practice anyway.  If you’re a high minute volume guy, you’re playing 35-plus a night, you’re not really doing much practicing.  Not if you’re on a winning team, so to speak.  So I don’t get it, and I really don’t think this is coming from the players.  This is more of management, coaching staff, training staff.  I mean, they’ve got all this new technology, I mean, we’re wearing pagers in our tank tops and we’re out there running around and then after practice they take your meter out and we look at your load.  I don’t know, maybe that has something to do with it.  But, hey, if you’re any kind of competitive and your competitive juices are flowing, this is the second month of the season, of course the dog days are ahead of you, but this is what it’s about.  This is what the grind is about.  Can you play at your best when your body or your mind is not really feeling up to it?  That’s what all the greats did.  That’s why we watched Michael Jordan.  That’s why we watched Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Isaiah Thomas, all the greats.  These guys never rested.  They never took a day off.  And so, for me, it’s just a new era that we play in and, yeah, it may give some guys longevity but you said it earlier, I played in both eras and I never rested, I never needed it.”

Terry shoots his own argument in the foot — the best players already barely practice. There are walk throughs, shootarounds, and some time in the weight room, but few “practices” like we picture in an NBA season. This isn’t high school ball. Still, players are fatigued and get injured because of the grind. They always have, it just wasn’t tracked before. Would Larry Bird’s back have allowed him to play longer if he got more rest?

Would LeBron James have willingly taken the court in Memphis this week — or Kevin Love, or Kyrie Irving — and played, and played well? Yes. Without a doubt. If you doubt the competitive fire of today’s top NBA players, you’re deluded.

But there also is no doubting the facts that all those “pagers” and science shows — fatigued players are far more likely to get injured. If you’re Tyronn Lue, you know you’re going to be the top seed in the East and probably on to the Finals (sorry Toronto). What matters to you more than a December game in Memphis is the health of your players. Keeping them rested and fresh. Keeping them on the court. So you make the big picture decisions even if that hurts the team for a night in the short term.

Even if that rest looks bad for the league. And no doubt it does.

The NBA is taking a step with the new CBA to start the season a week or so early to allow more space in the schedule, thereby reducing the number of back-to-backs. That will help. But as the only real solution is cutting the season back by 20 or so games, and we know that is happening, rest is going to be part of the NBA going forward.

PBT Extra: Three biggest changes in new NBA CBA

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The new NBA Collective Bargaining Agreement — which still needs to be ratified by both the players and owners, but will be — is largely a nod to the status quo. On the big issues — such as how to divide up revenues — the two sides came together quickly.

But there are changes coming.

That will mean a lot more money for Stephen Curry, and it’s going to make the decision for DeMarcus Cousins on whether he wants to leave Sacramento far more interesting. Like 60 million ways more interesting.

I cover that and more in this latest PBT Extra, looking at the changes coming with the new CBA.

Want to credit someone for new CBA getting done? Thank Michael Jordan.

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Michael Jordan has some credibility with NBA players, what with the six rings and being the GOAT and all.

Michael Jordan also is an NBA owner.

The Charlotte Hornets’ owner is getting a lot of credit for helping get the tentative new Collective Bargaining Agreement to this point (it awaits the formality of approval by the players and owners). From NBA.com’s Steve Aschburner:

“It’s an emotional endeavor on both sides,” said Cleveland Cavaliers forward James Jones, secretary-treasurer of the National Basketball Players Association. “So you have to speak on the same frequency. Mike is able to do that, because he understands the opposition.”

Union president Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers said: “I think he speaks from a great place, because he’s been on both sides of the table as a player and as an owner. It’s always good conversation, good to hear him give his opinion on things. Just like with anything, you disagree on some things, agree on some.”

Atlanta Hawks wing Kyle Korver, a member of the union’s committee, said of Jordan: “He’s helped create and generate conversations that in previous [negotiations] were really hard to come by. There was, at times, a lot of frustration, a lot of anger, on both sides, and everybody trying to hold onto what is ours. One of the reasons why this negotiation has gone so much better is because there has been so much more communication. And to be able to do that you’ve got to have people who know both sides. And Michael’s been really involved, he’s really added to the process.”

It wasn’t just these players, Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, Warriors co-owner Joe Lacob, and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver also praised Jordan. He has a unique perspective, and he can help both sides understand where the other side is coming from more clearly. Which is often the hard part of any negotiation — both sides need to feel like they win for any labor deal to be struck, and Jordan can help facilitate that.

That said, Jordan doesn’t deserve the most credit, Adam Silver should get that for the renegotiated television deal. What really made this deal come together was the flood of money that came into the system with the new TV deal last summer — everybody’s making more money, nobody wanted to screw that up, so they found a way to make it work.