Author: Kurt Helin

Shawn Marion fashion photo

Shawn Marion announces he will retire after this season


The Matrix is ready to walk away. On his own terms.

Four-time All-Star and NBA champion (2011 Mavericks) Shawn Marion is going to retire after this season with the Cleveland Cavaliers. This is Marion’s 15th NBA season but at age 36 the pull of family was too strong, he told Paul Coro of the Arizona Republic.

When the Suns drafted Marion in 1999, Marion set a goal to play 15 seasons. The 36-year-old believes he could play another three seasons but being away from his first child, 8-month-old Shawn, has convinced him to retire after this season with the Cavaliers.

“I wanted to go out on my terms,” Marion said. “The biggest thing is having a son. I got attached to him. Seeing him periodically is hard. Watching him grow up on pictures and videos is hard.”

Marion signed with Cleveland this summer in part to be closer to his son, who lives in Chicago. Also, the Cavaliers looked like contenders.

While Marion has played for other teams and won his ring since then, we will remember him as part of the revolutionary Phoenix Suns teams that featured Steve Nash and Amare Stoudemire. Marion’s length, athleticism, and balanced game made him a great fit for those teams. He was part of the revolution in that he could play fast and at either the three or the four — and he could guard multiple positions well. Marion averaged 18.4 points and 10.0 rebounds but that really only tells part of the story of what he did with that team.

Ultimately, then GM Steve Kerr traded Marion for Shaquille O’Neal in an ill-fated move that spelled the end of the chances for those Suns.

Grantland’s Zach Lowe started an interesting debate on twitter.

In the end I think Marion misses the cut, but like Marion himself his case is sneaky good and based not on the raw numbers as much as the understanding of people who watched him on how he influenced the game.

Whatever happens with the Hall, Marion’s style will be missed.

Bulls GM denies Thibodeau on hot seat, while Thibs channels Yoda

Tom Thibodeau

No doubt the Bulls are struggling of late — 4-6 in their last 10 and more shockingly with the 26th worst defense in the NBA in that stretch.

Combine that with Tom Thibodeau’s rocky history with the Chicago front office, and there are rumors being reported that Thibodeau is on the hot seat. The rumor goes he is “too hardcore” and has lost the locker room.

Don’t be so sure about all that.

Don’t take my word for it, take the words of Bulls GM Gar Forman speaking to the Sun Times.

“No,’’ general manager Gar Forman said in a text, when asked if there had been discussions about Thibodeau’s job security. “It’s not a story.’’

When Thibodeau was asked about it, he channeled Yoda.

“Could care less, I could.”

(Thibodeau was using that as the expression that he does not care, as opposed to the literal translation.)

As for those hard practices wearing guys down, that is a year behind the times. The Bulls have not had nearly as many practices as one would suspect due to the schedule, plus when they have practiced they have not had everybody healthy. Tuesday was the first time that had happened in a while.

Pau Gasol’s been around the block, is he worn down by the grinding practices?

“To me, honestly, I don’t think Tom is that hardcore. I don’t think we practice that hard. We do what we need to do, and he tries his best with us just like we try our best. We have to get on the same page, not really pointing fingers but being positive with each other.’’

Thibodeau’s seat is not that hot. If the Bulls don’t right the ship and slink out of the playoffs early, there will be a lot of questions and soul searching in the Bulls organization. Thibodeau would have questions to answer.

But we are a long way from that.

PBT’s Mid-Season NBA Awards: Curry, Harden, and love for Budenholzer

Serbia v USA - 2014 FIBA World Basketball Championship

We’re at the mid-way point of the NBA season — it’s time to hand out some virtual hardware.

Or, at least who we think should take home the NBA award hardware at this point. There’s still half a season to go and so every race is still open to change… except maybe Rookie of the Year.

The races feel wide open because some of the obvious front-runners have been injured and/or off their game — before the season everyone thought that MVP would be a two-horse race between Kevin Durant and LeBron James, but as of right now neither might make the top five for that award. So it goes on down the line.

The entire team at ProBasketballTalk — Kurt Helin, Brett Pollakoff, Dan Feldman and Sean Highkin — voted on all the major end-of-the-year awards and we’ve laid out our choices below below, with a little explanation of the thinking on each. As noted above, this is who would get our vote as of today, this list could look very different come the end of the season.


Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors (Kurt, Dan, Sean): Offensively he is a force of nature and is the only player in the NBA in the top 10 in scoring (23.2 per game), assists (8 per game) and he is doing it efficiently — he is taking 16.4 shots a game, and has a ridiculous true shooting percentage of .636. However, the real reason he’s the best player on the best player on the best team is his improved defense. It’s not just the 2.1 steals per game it’s his ability to fight over picks, plus his improved help defense. This race is far from over — with Kevin Durant and LeBron James down this season the field is wide open — but Curry is making a strong case for the MVP. —KH

James Harden, Houston Rockets (Brett): Stephen Curry has been the best player on the league’s best team, and usually that’s enough to warrant MVP consideration. But James Harden has simply been otherworldly offensively, and much more valuable to his team’s overall success. Harden leads the league in scoring, has scored 40 or more points on four separate occasions, and led the Rockets to an 8-3 record while Dwight Howard was sidelined due to injury. Curry may be able to similarly carry his team, but the wealth of talent in Golden State means he hasn’t had to. Harden has, and he’s more than risen to that challenge. —BP


Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves (unanimous): This category has felt cursed with guys like Joel Embiid, Jabari Parker and Julius Randle out of the running due to injuries. But let’s not take away from the fact Andrew Wiggins has become a real shooter — he hit 39 percent from three in January — and is regularly notching 20 point games to go with his already solid defense and off the charts athleticism. This is not the most impressive rookie class so far, but Wiggins is starting to look like he could be special. He is developing quickly. —KH


Mike Budenholzer, Atlanta Hawks (unanimous): There is a reason the Spurs didn’t want to see Budenholzer leave, that they wanted him to take over for Popovich someday, and you’re seeing it in Atlanta. The culture of selfless basketball, the player movement and ball movement, getting guys to buy in is all very Spursian and Budenholzer has brought it to Atlanta. Oh, and he’s got this team defending as well. Steve Kerr might be second in this race, he’s done a good job, but nobody has exceeded expectations and changed the feel of a team like Budenholzer. —KH

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Lou Williams, Toronto Raptors (Brett): It often takes two seasons for someone to fully recover from knee surgery and Williams is the poster child for that, bouncing back this season for the Raptors to score 15 points a game in better than 24 minutes a night. His athleticism has returned and with that he is attacking and getting to the line 4.8 times a game. He’s the energy the Raptors needed off the bench and is putting up numbers that warrant him winning the award.

Marreese Speights, Golden State Warriors (Kurt, Sean): While he’s playing fewer minutes (just below 19 a game) than any of the other candidates for this rather wide open award, he’s having a huge impact. There are the raw numbers of 12.6 points and 5.1 rebounds a game, but Speights is putting up his numbers far more efficiently than his competition with a .568 true shooting percentage and a 21.2 PER. Speights is also the best defensive player of the candidates, and is a central part of the Warriors’ league-best defense. —KH

Tristan Thompson, Cleveland Cavaliers (Dan): Sixth Man of the Year is a wide-open race with at least a dozen legitimate candidates. I went with Thompson, who’s averaging 9.8 points and 8.1 rebounds per game, because he’s filled a large role while clearly making his team better when on the court. To be fair, Thompson earned a lot of his value while starting for an injured Anderson Varejao, but the award’s criteria doesn’t separate production when starting vs. coming off the bench. The only rule is a player must come off the bench more than he starts, which Thompson has (31 games off the bench, 11 starts). With Timofey Mozgov stepping in, Thompson probably won’t deserve this honor at the end of the year, but for the season’s first half, he’s got my vote. —DF


Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors (Kurt, Dan): You really need to watch Golden State’s league-best defense to see how Draymond Green is key, how he is the glue that makes it work and how he should be DPOY. The advanced stats show it, he leads the NBA in defensive rating and defensive win shares. If you get caught up in his traditional numbers — not bad at 1.5 blocks and 1.4 steals a game but not eye popping — you miss the point. This is more like Marc Gasol winning a couple of years ago, when you watched closely he deserved it. There are other deserving candidates this year but Green should be at the top of the list. —KH

Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs (Sean): Father time is losing the foot race with Duncan and he has anchored another strong year from the Spurs defense. Duncan has some raw numbers — two blocks a game while being in the top-five of both defensive rating and defensive win shares — but it is his intangibles leading that defense and make the Spurs dangerous. It doesn’t matter what age he is. —KH

DeAndre Jordan, Los Angeles Clippers (Brett): Remember that part of defense is rebounding — you need to end the other team’s possession — and nobody has been better at that this season than Jordan, who is pulling down 13.4 boards a game. Combine that with his 2.4 blocks a game (second in the league) and you have a guy in charge of the glass when he is on the court.


Jimmy Butler, Chicago Bulls (Kurt, Brett, Dan): If you’re going to improve, do it in a contract year. Butler and the Bulls couldn’t agree on a contract extension number and now the Bulls are going to really pay for him because in addition to his quality defense Butler has found his shooting stroke, hitting 39.7 percent from three (up from 28.3 percent a year ago), and is shooting 46.5 percent overall (up from 39.7 percent last season). He’s averaging 20.6 points a game for an improved Bulls offense, and while he’s been in a bit of a slump the past few weeks he’s still the leader in this category. —KH

Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors (Sean): Under head coach Steve Kerr Green has jumped both in his production and role to become a key part of the West’s best team in the first half. He’s scoring more points (11.5 a game) but is doing it more efficiently and he is taking more threes and helping spread the floor for a team that loaded with dangerous shooters. He’s also a very good defender who has been the glue for making what the Warriors do on that end work. His improvement, and the trust Kerr has shown in him, make him a Sixth Man of the Year.