Author: Kurt Helin

Larry Sanders

Report: Milwaukee Bucks in talks to buy out Larry Sanders


Larry Sanders has played in just 27 games for the Bucks this season. First he missed time for personal reasons. Then came a 10-game suspension from the league for marijuana use (he failed at least four tests to get there). Now that suspension has been extended past the 10 games (the team is again listing him out for “personal reasons”). All that comes after last season when a nightclub brawl left him with an injured thumb in need of a surgery. There were the charges of animal cruelty. Sanders has played just 50 games for the Bucks over two seasons since his four-year, $44 million deal kicked in.

The Bucks have had enough; they are moving on without him.

The Bucks have started talks to buyout the remaining two pus years of Sanders’ contract, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

Buyout discussions have begun between the Milwaukee Bucks and Larry Sanders that would make the recently suspended big man a free agent, according to league sources…

He’s been one of the league’s most impactful defensive big men when he’s been on the floor, but the surprising Bucks — off to a 30-23 start under Kidd — have coped well without him this season, posting a 12-7 record in those games while relying on the likes of John Henson, Ersan Ilyasova, Zaza Pachulia and the recently signed Kenyon Martin.

The Bucks see a future where this core of players — with a few additions — could grow into a real threat in the East. Sanders was to be part of that core, their defensive anchor, but this season the Bucks’ defense has been 1.9 points per 100 possessions better when Sanders is off the court. For Milwaukee, he’s just not worth the disruptions.

Sanders has said he plans to continue his NBA career and tweeted this out last week.

While it’s common for a player seeking a buyout to take a discount to get out of his deal (for example, that’s what Amare Stoudemire will do for the Knicks) there is no motivation for Sanders or his agent to give the Bucks a price break. They will pay full price to make him go away.

Next summer, if he does show he’s not smoking anymore, some team will take a shot on him. However, it’s going to be for far, far less than the $11 million he was set to make this year.

Russell Westbrook hits head on backboard finishing alley-oop (VIDEO)

Russell Westbrook

Russell Westbrook was having an All-Star Game for the history books — 41 points, the second most points in NBA All-Star Game history. Nobody could stop Westbrook.

Except the backboard.

On the video above Westbrook hit his head on the backboard while finishing an alley-oop. Here is a better look at that.

Too much Russell Westbrook lifts West to 163-158 All-Star Game win

Russell Westbrook

NEW YORK — If the East had beaten the ridiculously deep Western Conference this season, somehow it would have felt wrong.

Russell Westbrook was not going to let that happen. The Thunder guard put up 41 points — just one shy of Wilt Chamberlain’s All-Star record, one more than Jordan’s 40 — with five of those coming in a late push to help the West hold off the East 163-159.

“It’s definitely and honor to be grouped with those two guys, especially in an All-Star Game,” Westbrook said of Chamberlain and Jordan.

While the atmosphere in New York was electric (and frigid) all weekend, the game on the court Sunday night resembled a lot of other All-Star Games — a defense-free pick-up game for three-and-a-half quarters, followed by a few minutes of real-ish basketball.

The game saw a lot of records almost fall.

The West’s 163 ties the record for most points in an All-Star Game by a team, tying the number the East put up last year to win the event.

LeBron James put up 30 points in a losing effort, leaving him just two points shy of passing Kobe Bryant for the most All-Star Game points ever.

“LeBron really impressed me with his seriousness tonight, how he approached the game, how he was just mentally and physically getting ready for the game,” Atlanta’s Kyle Korver said. “I know he had a packed weekend, but just the way he approached the game I was really impressed by him.”

Korver almost made history himself. The Atlanta Hawks sharpshooter made seven three-pointers (on 12 attempts), one shy of the All-Star Game record of eight.

“Sometimes the wide open ones are the hardest ones,” Korver said of playing in this kind of defense-free exhibition. “I left a couple of them from the corner short, I wish I had them back.”

The first half started off as the West show. James Harden put up a quick 11 points on 4-of-5 shooting to push the West to 28-18 lead. Then Westbrook came in and started gunning threes, knocking down a few quick ones and suddenly he was on his way to the best first half in NBA All-Star Game history with 27 points.

All that had the West up by 20 at one point, but no lead is safe when no defense is being played. The East made a run in the final five minutes of the first half, in part behind LeBron who came out hot (4-of-5 shooting to open game) and had 22 first half points. The East closed the gap, and it was 83-82 West at the half.

The East took a 115-114 lead with 2:51 left in the third quarter after coach Mike Budenholzer went with a lineup of four Hawks — Jeff Teague, Kyle Korver, Paul Millsap, Al Horford — plus LeBron. It was tied 122-122 entering the fourth.

The fourth quarter saw Chris Paul put up 10 points and DeMarcus Cousins put up nine. That proved to be too much for the East to overcome, despite eight points in the fourth from Kyrie Irving.

James Harden finished with 29 points for the West while LaMarcus Aldridge — named a starter on Saturday to replace Anthony Davis — finished with 18. John Wall had 19 points and seven assists for the East.