Kurt Helin

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Will Dwyane Wade be a Chicago Bull next season?


Dwyane Wade has expressed his frustration with the Bulls this season — both with teammates and management. He’s also not seeming to take head coach Fred Hoiberg very seriously. It all points to a big question:

Will Dwyane Wade be a Chicago Bull next season?

He has said he will consider opting out, but will not make any call until the season is over.

I can think of 23.8 million reasons Wade could be back as a Bull next season — that is how much his player option is for, and it’s unlikely he would make that much on the open market (although he could get a multi-year deal and more security). Also, Chicago is his hometown and he has been active off the court in his city, he may not want to walk away from that. He may not want to leave playing with Jimmy Butler.

Rival executives are not so convinced that’s enough, reports Ken Berger of Bleacher Report (in a must-read piece about the dysfunction in Chicago).

Wade, 35, has a player option for next season. Given the tumult in Chicago, rival executives believe it’s reasonable to expect Wade may want out—despite the $23.8 million he is owed if he stays.

The question is, how strong would the market for a 35-year-old two guard with questionable knees be? He is averaging 18.8 points a game, he can still create shots for himself and others, and he’s still a good player on the perimeter. He has real value, but how much will teams pay for it?

There are some contending teams — Cavaliers, Clippers, others — that would have an interest in Wade as a free agent, but only if he was willing to take a considerable pay cut. To use the examples cited, LeBron James may not care, but Cavaliers already have the NBA’s highest payroll. The Clippers need to shell out this summer to retain Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, and J.J. Redick (all of whom would be more important on the court to the Clippers than Wade).

What other teams are out there might offer remains to be seen.

Wade likely has not made up his mind yet, he will get to the off-season then make his call. He’s going to need to decide what matters most to him in the balance of money/winning/playing with friends. He can’t have everything, so what is it that drives him now?

Fan sends Dirk Nowitzki a potato with his picture on it. You can’t make this stuff up.


NBA players get some odd fan mail. Because the NBA has some odd fans.

But I can’t remember anything like this:

Dirk Nowitzki Tweeted out a photo of a potato he was sent, with his picture emblazoned across it.

I’d make a joke here, but there are literally no good potato jokes.

Nets’ Caris LeVert with steal then transition slam (VIDEO)

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Good things are happening in Brooklyn. Mostly in the food scene, but a few things on the basketball court at the Barclays’ Centre, too.

For example, there is Caris LeVert, who is looking like a player.

The Nets got crushed by the Thunder and Nets fans were openly rooting for Westbrook. But LeVert was still making plays, like the steal and dunk above. It’s something to cheer for, besides the opposing team

Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge cleared by doctors, can return to Spurs lineup tonight

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When San Antonio’s LaMarcus Aldridge was sidelined with a heart arrhythmia, it was scary — that can be potentially serious.

But the Spurs weren’t kidding when they called it “minor” at the time, he has already been cleared to return to action after missing just two games, the team announced Wednesday. He does not have any restrictions.

“We are thankful that LaMarcus will be able to rejoin the team,” said Spurs General Manager RC Buford. “All of us have been impressed with the professionalism and grace he has shown in dealing with this difficult situation.”

Team doctors first noticed an occurrence of a minor heart arrhythmia in Oklahoma City on March 9. After that he was monitored and underwent a battery of tests and exams, while team doctors consulted with experts. A heart arrhythmia is when the heart beats too fast, too slow or irregularly — the sensation is that of a “fluttering” heart or a heart that is racing. It means the electrical impulses that control the heart beats are off, but the causes and severity can of this problem can vary widely.

Aldridge will suit up for the Spurs against the Trail Blazers Wednesday night. Aldridge was an All-Star and an All-NBA player last season who is averaging 19.1 points and 8.3 rebounds a game for the Spurs this season. San Antonio is just half a game back of the Warriors for the top seed in the West (and the NBA), and the two teams are tied in the loss column.

Darko Milicic is finally happy, at peace, working as a Serbian farmer


You know Darko Milicic as the guy drafted after LeBron James but before Dwyane Wade, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and a host of other future NBA stars. While he bounced around the NBA for a decade as a big at the end of the bench, his name became synonymous with “bust.” His nickname was “human victory cigar.” A guy who grew up in the shadow of the Yugoslavian civil wars, he was known for being a bit morose during his NBA tenure.

When last we saw Milicic he was trying his hand at kickboxing. While he thought he was great at it, results suggested otherwise.

Maybe he’s at peace now — as a Serbian farmer. Milicic talked about it in an interview with Serbian news website B92.net, transcribed at r/NBA.

I’ve gained 90 pounds since I stopped playing, I’m at 350 right now. I’m working on my farm and enjoying that kind of production. I take walks through my fields and watch the process, which makes me really happy. I’m still pretty inexperienced at this so I like to learn, seek guidance, go to seminars. I’ve created my own peace of mind and I’m enjoying it.

Good for him… well, not the 90 pounds part, that’s not really healthy, but the feeling at peace thing. Everyone deserves the chance to be happy, and if you go read the transcription of the interview he admits he was never comfortable and happy in the NBA.

I was the problem. That initial dissatisfaction probably led to me starting to hate and not enjoy playing. There were some situations where I’ve already scored 20 points, but in my head I’m thinking: “When will this game finally end, come on, let’s pack it up and go home.” I just had to feed my ego, I couldn’t care less what’s going to happen the following week. My whole approach since coming to the US was just wrong. I could say I was too young back then, but I chose to go there myself and I obviously wasn’t prepared for what the league would require from me….

Playing in the NBA is a dream come true for majority of basketball players, and everyone should strive to achieve that. But if you can’t get used to the atmosphere you’re living in, you’ll have a bad time, both as a person and as a player. The lifestyle didn’t suit me at all, I’m a very social guy and I like to hang out. There’s none of that in the US, it’s simply go to work and go home. See you at the practice, see you in the plane, see you in the bus, see you at the gym and that’s it. You live game by game, hotel by hotel.

It sounds like he was never on a team with great chemistry, or when he was (Detroit) he was not ready to fit into that. He admits his mistakes.

Hopefully, now, he’s in a good space.