Kurt Helin

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Draymond Green #23 of the Golden State Warriors poses for the Warriors social media team during the Golden State Warriors Media Day at the Warriors Practice Facility on September 26, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Marreese Speights: Warriors’ Draymond Green, Klay Thompson “got into it a lot”


From the outside it looked like basketball heaven — the team played fast and loose, they had fun, the ball flew around the court like no other team, and they won. A lot. The Golden State Warriors won 73 games and seemed to have a good time doing it. It was what drew Kevin Durant to the Warriors last summer.

But pull back the curtain and it was not exactly a fairytale.

Draymond Green‘s hard-charging, heart-on-his-sleeve emotional leadership was at times abrasive and wore on teammates. While team chemistry was not terrible, there were plenty of rough spots. It a well-researched story at ESPN Ethan Sherwood-Straus lays out how Green is irreplaceable to the Warriors on the court but rubs teammates the wrong way at times off it. This quote from now former Warrior Marreese Speights sums the article up best (but you should read the entire thing).

“Draymond f—ed up practice and s—,” then-Warriors center Marreese Speights says. “Draymond’s a good guy, but I think at the end of the day, it hurt the whole chemistry of the year.” One player in particular, he says, took much of the heat: “Draymond and Klay got into it a lot.” (Thompson declined to comment for this story.

A code of conduct exists within the NBA. Some yelling is expected, but vets do not accept frequent Bobby Knight — style haranguings from younger players. Or, as Speights puts it, “Guys don’t respect you if you yell at them in front of all these fans. We’re not trying to lose the game. F — .”

If your thought is, “Maybe the Warriors would be better off without Green,” go back and watch Game 5 of the Finals last season (not that the return of Green changed Games 6 and 7, but the Warriors in Game 5 were not the same). The game where Green was suspended because he couldn’t stop from hitting LeBron James in the nuts, the Warriors lacked enough fight. The Warriors are not the same team without him — all those pretty shooters on the perimeter like Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson need someone in the paint doing the dirty work. Someone who makes their defensive switching schemes work. Someone who brings grit and fire. Green does all of that and better than anyone in the league. They need him.

But that kind of fire and passion comes with a cost, both in the locker room and off the court. Remember this summer Green was involved in a bar fight in East Lansing, then sent out a picture of his, um, “privates” to the world. That was after he was in the middle of the Warriors historic blown Finals lead.

The most competitive guys in the league do rub teammates the wrong way sometimes — Kobe Bryant certainly did, Kevin Garnett did at times, Chris Paul can grate on teammates — but the best teams need that passion. What the Warriors would hope to see, however, what Kobe and Garnett and CP3 can do, is separate the on-the-court guy from the guy off the court. They have a level of maturity and control Green has yet to display consistently.

For Green, it’s a goal. Outside of injuries, only chemistry issues could keep these Warriors from at least a return to the NBA Finals. They are that talented. If there are going to be chemistry challenges, it could start with Green. He’s not the best player on the Warriors, but he’s important to what they do. They need him right, and right with the team.

Derrick Rose rape lawsuit trial heading to Los Angeles jury

FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, file photo, New York Knicks basketball player Derrick Rose arrives at U.S. District Court in downtown Los Angeles. The lawsuit alleging NBA star Rose and his friends raped an incapacitated woman is all about consent. Jurors who return to court Tuesday, Oct. 18, for the civil trial will have to determine whether the woman agreed to sex or was too incapacitated to do so. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The rape lawsuit trial of NBA star Derrick Rose is heading to the jury.

A Los Angeles panel is scheduled to begin deliberating Wednesday in a civil suit that claims Rose and two friends gang-raped his ex-girlfriend in 2013 at her Los Angeles apartment after she passed out from drugs or drink.

Rose’s attorneys call the sex consensual and contend the woman is simply seeking a $21.5 million payday.

In closing arguments Tuesday, Rose’s lawyer argued that the 30-year-old woman was suing for money and for revenge because the New York Knicks point guard ended their relationship.

However, the woman’s lawyer told jurors that she was the victim of a “classic” gang rape.

51 Questions: Which team will take biggest step back this season?

BARCELONA, SPAIN - OCTOBER 05:  Russell Westbrook of Oklahoma City Thunder looks on during the warm up prior to the NBA Global Games Spain 2016 match between FC Barcelona Lassa and Oklahoma City Thunder at Palau Sant Jordi on October 5, 2016 in Barcelona, Spain.  (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

We are in the home stretch of PBT’s 2016-17 NBA preview series, 51 Questions. For more than a month (and continuing through the start of the NBA season) we tackle 51 questions we cannot wait to see answered during the upcoming NBA season. We are entering the prediction portion of the preview season, today the PBT staff is tackling:

Which team will take the biggest step back this season?

Kurt Helin: Oklahoma City Thunder

In terms of the raw numbers, the Miami Heat may well take the title; they could lose 15 or more games this season compared to a year ago (thanks to no Chris Bosh or Dwyane Wade). But Miami’s slide is not as painful as Oklahoma City’s for the fan base — the Thunder will fall out of contender status. I expect OKC will win 7-10 fewer games than a season ago, but still make the playoffs. However, with Kevin Durant they were legit title contenders, without him they are likely a one-and-done postseason team at best. That’s  a real blow for the team’s fans.

Dan FeldmanOklahoma City Thunder

Could it be any other team? Losing Kevin Durant took them from legitimate championship contender to uncertain playoff team. Even if Russell Westbrook leads Oklahoma City to the highest end of its potential, there’s a huge drop knowing a title is no longer realistic.

Dane Carbaugh: Miami Heat

It’s hard to look at losing Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade and not think the Heat are in for a big step back. The Eastern Conference playoff teams from last season got tougher: Boston added Al Horford; the Hornets are building; Detroit is in Year 2 of Stan Van Gundy; Chicago is … well, they have Wade at least. The Heat re-signed Hassan Whiteside, and Justise Winslow will continue to grow. But if things go poorly for Miami to start, Goran Dragic could be an early trade piece and with him gone a Miami slump out of the playoffs would be almost guaranteed.

Watch DeMarcus Cousins drop 23 on Clippers Tuesday

1 Comment

It was a showdown of the USA’s Olympic centers — DeMarcus Cousins vs. DeAndre Jordan.

Well, maybe “showdown” is a bit of a strong word for a preseason game, but Cousins got the best of his gold medal teammate dropping 23 points on 10-of-17 in the game. Cousins knocked down midrange jumpers, ran the floor in transition, and was a bully inside (especially when matched up with anyone smaller than himself, such as Blake Griffin). Cousins also pulled down eight rebounds and looked to be in midseason form in front of the home crowd at the new building in downtown Sacramento.

The Clippers came from behind in the fourth quarter to get the 92-89 win, if you care about such things in the preseason.

Report: Spurs deny any kind of trade talks involving LaMarcus Aldridge

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 12: LaMarcus Aldridge #12 of the San Antonio Spurs pauses as he watches game action against the Oklahoma City Thunder  during the second half of Game Six of the Western Conference Semifinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 12, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.   NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
Getty Images

There have been a couple of reports this preseason suggesting the Spurs could come around to the idea of trading LaMarcus Aldridge, the latest coming from the highly-respected Jackie McMullan of ESPN. There have been questions about his fit off the court with the button-down Spurs organization, whether or not he was happy sharing the spotlight (an issue that was at the heart of the friction he had in Portland with Brandon Roy then Damian Lillard).

But did you really think the Spurs were going to rush into anything in the short term? That’s about as likely as the third presidential debate being a thoughtful, civil policy discussion. The Spurs have not made a move toward moving Aldridge, and they may never take that step. Jeff McDonald and Jabari Young break it all down at the San Antonio Express-News.

Spurs sources denied the report, saying no talks have occurred with any team….

They do not enter 2016-17 with the immediate intention of rebuilding in aftermath of Tim Duncan’s retirement. They did not sign Pau Gasol to a $31 million contract and bring Manu Ginobili back at $14 million with designs on scrapping everything and starting over.

Still, if their season goes unexpectedly south, league sources believe the Spurs might be tempted to investigate what return they might get for Aldridge.

So to be clear: If the Spurs — who most prognosticators see as the third or fourth best team in the NBA, a team on its way to at least 55 wins once again — struggle they might start to explore trade packages. Might. Don’t go counting on Aldridge coming to your team anytime soon.

The Spurs are going to make as good a run as they can at Golden State this season, and if that doesn’t pan out maybe next summer changes come. But don’t expect a rushed mid-season move, that’s just not who Gregg Popovich and the Spurs are.