Author: John Krolik

DeAndre Jordan, Corey Maggette

Warriors apparently ready to offer DeAndre Jordan around $10 million


From the Contra Costa Times’ Marcus Thompson:

The Warriors are preparing an offer sheet for Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, according to a team source. The Warriors must have the space under the cap to cover the first year of the deal in order to make the offer. Don’t yet know how much the offer will be. But …

If the Warriors (and this is me just thinking out loud now) are going to offer Jordan a double-figure salary in the first year of the deal, they will likely have to waive guard Charlie Bell via amnesty.

Considering that the Warriors would be paying more than $9 million a year to a player that averaged 7.1 points per game last season and can’t score in the post, make a jumper, or make more than half of his free throws, this deal might seem a bit crazy.

However, look at the starting centers of the 4 teams that played in the Conference Finals last season:

– Tyson Chandler

– Joel Anthony

– Joakim Noah

– Kendrick Perkins

Those are four very good defensive players who protect the rim, and, with the exception of Anthony, are efficient, low-usage offensive players. Perkins isn’t as good offensively as Chandler or Noah, and Noah’s passing and ball-handling make him a different kind of offensive threat, but none of those players have reliable mid-range jumpers or refined post games. A possible Causation/Correlation error is certainly worth mentioning here, but the point is that a “traditional” post-up center no longer seems to be a requirement for on-court greatness.

Jordan’s free throw struggles are certainly a concern (although he’d somehow be a significant upgrade over Andris Biedrins at the line), but he protects the rim, is a ridiculous athlete who makes himself available for crushing dunks, and converted on nearly 70% of his shots last season. Those are the kind of centers the best teams in the NBA currently employ, and that may well make DeAndre Jordan worth $10 million.

For the Warriors, though, this is a bit strange. The team is only a year removed from taking Ekpe Udoh with the 6th overall pick in the draft, and while Udoh shot 43.7% from the floor in his rookie season instead of a DeAndre-like conversion rate, he’s a great defensive prospect, and it would seem strange for the Warriors to spend so much money on a player whose skills seem to have a lot of overlap with one of their best young prospects’, but centers like Jordan are becoming more and more valuable, and the Warriors’ new owners seem extremely eager to make a splash this off-season.

Daequan Cook re-signs with Thunder for 2 years, $7.5 million

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According to Marc Spears of Yahoo! Sports, the Oklahoma City Thunder have signed 24-year old 3-point specialist Daequan Cook to a 2 year, $7.5 million extension.

Cook, who was unceremoniously thrusted upon Oklahoma City to create cap space for the Heat in a 2010 draft-day trade, played in 43 games for the Thunder last season, and the 2009 3-point shootout champion gave the team some of the floor spacing it desperately needed by averaging a career-high 43.6% from the floor and 42.2% from the field. $7.5 million over two years seems steep for a one-dimensional player who averaged only 5.6 points per game last season, but the Thunder do need outside shooters, and Cook fills that role for them.

76ers sign Thaddeus Young to 5-year, $42 million contract

Thaddeus young

From the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Kate Fagan:

Here’s final details on @yungsmoove21‘s deal to return to #Sixers: contract is for $43 million over 5 years. Or just about $8.3 million per.

According to Fagan, Young will have a player option for the 5th year of his deal. The 23-year old Young, who was a lottery pick in 2007, played in all 82 games for the 76ers last season, and came off the bench in all but one of them. In those 82 games, Young averaged 12.7 points per game while shooting a career-high mark of 54.1% from the field, and his 5.3 rebounds per game were also a career-high. Young is a part of the 76ers’ promising youth movement, and his versatility, energy, length, and athleticism were things the 76ers were clearly unwilling to part with this off-season.

Pistons have nothing to do with Chris Paul trade, but do re-sign Prince and Jerebko

Tayshuan Prince, Gerald Wallace
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From the AP:

DETROIT – The Detroit Pistons are attempting to rebuild by keeping at least a couple key players.

Tayshaun Prince and Jonas Jerebko will re-sign with the Pistons, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press on Thursday on condition of anonymity because the deals have not been announced.

Prince, an unrestricted free agent, is expected to sign a four year, $27 million contract. Jerebko, a restricted free agent, will be back for a $16 million, four-year deal.

The re-signing of Prince, a 31-year old swingman known for his bizarre-yet-effective shooting stroke, extremely long arms, and quality defense, doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense for a rebuilding team like the Pistons — why pay $7 million a year over four years for a solid starter on the tail end of his prime who will become far less effective as he gets less athletic? Prince was there for the Pistons’ championship season and some other great playoff runs, but it may have been imprudent for Detroit to keep Prince in this situation.

Assuming that Jonas Jerebko can come all the way back from the torn Achilles tendon injury that caused him to miss all of last season, his signing makes far more sense for the Pistons than the Prince one did — Jerebko is young, plays with a lot of energy and heart, and has some good all-around skills that should only improve as he logs more time in the NBA.

Still, the Pistons have just committed a total of $11 million a year over the next four years to two role players who will likely never be anywhere close to the All-Star level. After effectively destroying his team by overpaying Charlie Villenueva and Ben Gordon in free agency, you’d think that Joe Dumars would have learned the dangers of paying for mid-level free agents by now, but apparently that’s not the case.

Quote of the day: Phil Jackson pretty much predicted the CP3 situation a year ago

Kobe Bryant And Phil Jackson Address The Media

Via a Kevin Ding article from December 29th, 2010, here’s Phil Jackson on the troubles the league-owned Hornets might run into:

The [Hornets] were recently bought by the NBA, which prompted Jackson to say: “Not happy about that.”

Jackson put forth a scenario where Hornets star Chris Paul might revive his demand for a trade, and Jackson wondered how the league could manage being the one deciding which other franchise would get Paul.

“Who’s going to pull the button on it?” Jackson asked. “When Chris says he has to be traded, how’s that going to go? … Someone’s going to have to make a very nonjudgmental decision on that part that’s not going to irritate anyone else in the league.”

Not bad, Mr. Jackson. I get the feeling this is one of those days where Phil Jackson is very much enjoying retirement.