D.J. Foster

Paul Millsap throws one down on Jared Sullinger (VIDEO)

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Atlanta Hawks forward Paul Millsap isn’t known as a huge dunker around the league. He’s a guy who does most of his work under the rim, not above it.

Still, if he builds up enough momentum, Millsap is big enough and athletic enough to dish out some damage. If you see Millsap rumbling towards the paint and you aren’t a shotclocker? Probably best just to get the heck out of the way.

Celtics big man Jared Sullinger is not a shotblocker. He also did not get out of the way. This was the result:

DeMarcus Cousins doesn’t let teammates shake hands with Chris Paul (VIDEO)

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DeMarcus Cousins, as we all know, has a short temper. The Clippers, as we all know, aren’t above trying to get under a player’s skin.

Put the two together, and you get some fireworks.

After the Clippers squeaked out a win at home over the Kings, Cousins wasn’t afraid to show his displeasure with the result. As Kings guard Isaiah Thomas went to shake hands with Chris Paul after the game, Cousins put an end to any friendliness or show of sportsmanship that was about to take place. (via @crabdribbles)

Thomas can do a lot of things on the court despite his stature, but stopping Cousins from dragging him away is apparently not one of those things. He tried to double-back to not leave Paul hanging, but Cousins wasn’t having it.

Paul and Cousins have sniped at each other plenty over the years, and this was Paul’s response to the whole ordeal after the game:

I have to say, “He needs some guidance” is one of the better digs I’ve seen in a while, even if Paul didn’t have to say much after the victory.

Cousins is a pretty polarizing guy in general, and stopping his teammates from shaking hands with the opponent falls in line with that. Some people like the animosity and the return to the “golden days” where players all wanted to rip each other’s throats out instead of be best friends. Others think that Cousins is just being a poor sport.

One thing is for sure: Cousins’ hatred for the Clippers is palpable, and it’s definitely entertaining.

Projecting recovery time for Derrick Rose after meniscus surgery

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According to multiple reports, Derrick Rose has torn the meniscus in his non-surgically repaired knee. He will require surgery and is currently listed as being out indefinitely.

Out indefinitely, of course, can mean a lot of different things. Marc Gasol was listed with that designation last year after an abdominal tear, and he came back after just two games.

So how much time will Rose actually miss? Obviously, the Bulls would be wise to play it plenty safe after surviving this scare, and truth be told, there shouldn’t be a crunch to rush Rose back to action. The Bulls are good enough to be a playoff team fairly easily, with or without their star point guard.

The severity of the meniscus tear matters a great deal when considering recovery times, and it isn’t uncommon for surgeons to make the decision on how much of the meniscus to repair or remove until once they are actually in the knee and can see the damage.

Point being, we’ll know more once Rose’s surgery is actually performed.

Here’s some good news, though:

What we can do in the meantime, though, is look at the recovery time for other athletes who have suffered meniscus injuries. Again, I can’t stress enough that every player is different, and every recovery process varies. Metta World Peace recovered from meniscus surgery in just 12 days. Other players have taken two months. These are just to provide context.

In the past, most teams have listed players out with a meniscus injury as being sidelined for “at least six weeks.” That was the time frame for Jeremy Lin back in 2012 and World Peace in 2013.

In 2011, Leon Powe suffered a torn meniscus and was slated to miss six weeks. He returned to play in seven weeks.

Tyrus Thomas suffered the same injury that year and was listed as being out for up to eight weeks. He returned early and was back on the floor in seven weeks.

It should be noted that Rose is a guard who replies on explosiveness and change of direction much more than a big man or post player would, which could lengthen a full recovery.

While the Bulls will almost certainly stick with the “out indefinitely” designation, particularly given Rose’s unique situation of recovering from an ACL tear, Rose’s recovery can probably be estimated at somewhere between 6-10 weeks. That’s based solely on what we’ve seen from other players who have suffered a similar injury, and again, we’ll know more once the actual surgery takes place.

Report: Derrick Rose tore his right meniscus and will need surgery

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That’s the sound of everyone exhaling.

When Derrick Rose left the game Friday with a right knee injury, the concern was that he tore his other ACL. Rose could put no weight on his non-surgically repaired leg, and he left the arena on crutches. It was very hard to be optimistic, but the Bulls received some relatively good news today from the results of the MRI.

Not to downplay the severity of Rose’s injury, but this could have been much worse.

There’s been no time frame placed on Rose’s recovery, because it likely depends on the severity of the tear. Rose will not be with the Bulls for the rest of their road trip.

 

If the meniscus needs to be fully repaired, Rose will likely miss more games. If it needs to be just trimmed and cleaned, the recovery time should be shorter. Either way, based on other meniscus injuries we’ve seen in the past, this shouldn’t keep Rose out for the rest of the season. Of course, every injury and body is unique, so we can’t say that with certainty.

Right now Rose is listed as “out indefinitely” according to multiple reports. Stay tuned for further updates.

Orthopedic surgeon explains why odds were never in Derrick Rose’s favor

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We’re still waiting on the official diagnosis of Derrick Rose’s knee injury, but there’s been plenty of interesting information floated out in the meantime.

It’s pretty difficult to find much optimism out there, but only the MRI scheduled today will reveal the severity of the injury. Anything else is just speculation or reading between the lines.

Still, there’s a major reason for concern. Rose’s injury was to his non-surgically repaired knee, which is a common problem for athletes returning from ACL tears. Here’s Dr. Mark Adickes, a former professional athlete who became an orthopedic surgeon, explaining why that is.

Athletes who suffer one ACL injury are vulnerable to other knee injuries, but the extent to which this is true is a little surprising.

While Rose’s repaired knee may have been as strong as it possibly could be, that doesn’t factor in your body and mind’s natural way of overcompensating, and it doesn’t factor in that you may be predisposed for injuries through no fault of your own.

Rose worked extremely hard to get back. He waited until he was ready both physically and mentally. But sometimes, as hopeless as this sounds, the odds just aren’t in your favor.

Here’s hoping Rose avoided another serious injury. We’ll know more tonight.