Author: Darius Soriano

Tony Parker, Stephen Curry

Preview: With Stephen Curry and Tony Parker banged up, other Warriors and Spurs will have to step up in Game 4


When the Spurs and Warriors face off today, they’ll do so with both their floor generals not 100% physically. And while Parker is sure he’ll play with his bruised calf, Curry is only “optimistic” he’ll be able to see the floor and sounds far from certain he’ll be near his best if he does play.

For the Warriors that’s not the best of news, obviously. Curry has been spectacular these playoffs and the focal point of his team’s high powered attack. These playoffs, when Curry is on the floor the Warriors boast an offensive efficiency (points per 100 possessions) of 110.8, but that number dips to an astonishingly low 83.0 when he goes to the bench, per If Curry isn’t able to approach his normal standards, the question then becomes if they can get enough production from the rest of their backcourt players to match a potent Spurs’ offense.

Jarrett Jack and Klay Thompson will need to raise their respective games, especially relative to what they were able to provide in game 3. Today, Jack can’t be the turnover machine he was and will need to avoid playing with the tunnel vision that freezes out his teammates way too often. Thompson, meanwhile, must get into the flow of the game early and often, looking for his shot off pin downs and in transition to help boost the offense.

Beyond the guards, the Warriors will also need for Harrison Barnes and Draymond Green to be assertive when they have match up advantages. Both have the ability to create offense for themselves and for others and if Curry is hampered, they’ll need to provide that extra playmaking to help supplement what Curry can’t provide. If both can not only get some key basket for themselves but create a few easy ones for the Warriors’ big men when the Spurs help, it would go a long way towards a successful day on that end.

Where the Warriors really need to figure things out is defensively. The Spurs, like they did in the Lakers’ series, seem to be rounding into form after getting a good sense of what their opponent likes to do defensively.

Tony Parker seems to be sorting out where the gaps in the defense are and is attacking when given space while hitting his jumper when his man tries to deny those driving lanes. That said, if his bum calf hampers his ability to create off the dribble, other Spurs ball handlers will need to step in and provide those skills. In game 1, Manu Ginobili was able to provide playmaking, but his scoring has suffered in this series. If he can break out today, it would be a huge boost to San Antonio.

In his own way, Tim Duncan may also have fill some of the playmaking void should Parker not be up to his normal standards. Operating from the elbow and the low post, Duncan can not only score but can be a facilitator for teammates when his team goes into their motion heavy sets. If Duncan shots start to fall, it will only open up his passing angles further and that will spell trouble for a Golden State defense that didn’t bring their top effort in game 3.

But, ultimately, this game will come down which team can get more from their banged up guards. Because while others will need to chip in, both Curry and Parker are too important to what their teams want to do offensively. And if either is substantially hampered in this game, their team will struggle to make up the difference in production as the defense tightens up against everyone else.

Tony Parker hits crazy circus shot in win over Warriors (VIDEO)

San Antonio Spurs v Golden State Warriors - Game Three

I’m not even sure what to call this. Is it a flip shot? A push shot? A shovel shot? Whatever it you want to call it, it was amazing.

Tony Parker was the offensive catalyst for the Spurs’ game 3 win over the Warriors and hitting shots like this one was one of the reasons why. Parker was aggressive all night in looking for his own shot and when he wasn’t knocking down jumpers, he was driving to the basket and making things happen in the paint.

And while you don’t expect him to hit shots like that one very often, it just goes to show how much of a knack he has for finishing in the paint. I guess he shot 69% at the rim this year for a reason.

Spurs ride strong nights from Tony Parker and Tim Duncan to take down Warriors

Spurs' Duncan pats team mate Parker on the head during their Game 3 win over the Golden State Warriors in their NBA Western Conference semi-final playoff basketball game in Oakland

It took 3 games, but the Spurs finally started to look like themselves against the Warriors. The ball movement was back, the defensive discipline was there and with those two things in place the Spurs took control back in the series with a 102-92 win in game 3.

After the game Gregg Popovich said that heading into the contest he implored Tony Parker and Tim Duncan to be more aggressive in looking for their own shots. Both stars took that advice to heart by showing up big and driving the Spurs’ offense from the outset.

Parker played to the level that had his name mentioned as an MVP candidate during the season, scoring 32 points on only 23 shots while tallying 5 rebounds and 5 assists as well. Parker did a lot of his damage from mid-range, using the threat of his driving ability to create space and consistently hit his jumper. When the defense tried to step up to contest his shot he used hesitation dribbles and quick bursts to get into the paint and finish at the rim.

Duncan, meanwhile, was nearly as good in his own right. After struggling to get good looks against Andrew Bogut in the series’ first two games, Duncan used all facets of his all-court game to score 23 much needed points for his team. He sank his jumper when operating as a release valve out of the pick and roll, then used those makes to set up his drives to the rim when his defender closed out too hard. Duncan also went to his bread and butter in the post, working his turnaround jumper and half hooks to very good results.

But where the Spurs were really at their best was on the defensive side of the ball.

Where Duncan and Parker combined for 55 points, the Warriors’ starting five only combined for 56. Particularly impressive was what they were able to do to the Warriors’ starting backcourt. Stephen Curry, who suffered a sprained ankle in the 4th quarter, only hit 5 of his 17 shots to score his 16 points while Klay Thompson only made 7 of his 20 attempts to score 17 points. Neither ever got into a rhythm, mostly because they couldn’t consistently create space to get off their jumpers.

With Tiago Splitter back in the starting lineup, the Spurs always had one big man at the rim to protect the paint and that allowed the other big to step out high on the pick and roll to deny the three point shots the Warriors love to take out of that action. Golden State only attempted 19 three pointers in this game after attempting 30 and 23 in games one and two respectively. Limiting those attempts threw off the Warriors’ offense and they had to look elsewhere for points.

Only, no one else could really step up to provide them. The most efficient Warriors on the night were Carl Landry (14 points on 5-8 shooting) and David Lee who, in three minutes of action, not only pumped up the crowd with his presence but also provide a nice boost by scoring 5 points on 3 shots. Beyond them, though, the Warriors box score was littered with poor shooting nights from Jarrett Jack (5-12), Harrison Barnes (4-10), and Draymond Green (2-7).

With the stars and the role players all having tough shooting nights the Warriors needed to play good defense and make all the little plays to win this game, but they couldn’t do those things either. Instead they committed 11 turnovers that the Spurs turned into 20 points and also had too many suspect offensive possessions where nearly the entire shot clock was eaten up by dribbling that never established a viable threat (I’m looking at you, Jarrett Jack).

After the game Mark Jackson noted that the Warriors aren’t good enough to win games in this series when they don’t play their game. And Jackson is 100% correct in that. But credit the Spurs because it was their execution that took away what the Warriors wanted to do, especially on defense where they effectively crowded shooters and showed quick, decisive help in the paint.

And with Parker and Duncan carrying the offense, that’s all they needed.

Brandon Roy waived by the Timberwolves

Brandon Roy

David Khan may have been relieved of his GM position with the Timberwolves, but the team is still cleaning up after his mistakes.

Today, the team officially announced that they have waived veteran guard Brandon Roy, likely ending his career in the process:

“We wish Brandon and his family all the best in the future,” said Timberwolves President of Basketball Operations Flip Saunders.

Roy tried to restart his career in Minnesota after retiring from the NBA with chronic knee pain after the 2010-11 campaign. Kahn took a gamble on Roy, signing him to a two year $10.4 million contract, hoping that he could come back even if only as a part time contributor to help the upstart ‘Wolves make a playoff push this season.

Unfortunately Roy was still hampered by the knee issues that plagued him, appearing in only 5 games and needing surgery after experiencing more pain throughout the season. In those 5 games Roy averaged 5.8 points, 4.6 assists, and 2.8 rebounds while shooting only 31.4% from the floor.

Roy appeared in three all-star games in his career, was a former rookie of the year with the Portland Trailblazers and one of the best young players in the league during his great, but brief prime. And while it was always a long shot that he’d be able to come back and be an effective player after all his health issues, it’s a shame that this is the way his career will end.

Preview: Spurs seek answers in game 3, but the Warriors keep changing the questions

Golden State Warriors v San Antonio Spurs - Game Two

It’s not a stretch to say the Warriors have been the better team so far this series. They’ve led both contests for the majority of the minutes and it took an amazing comeback, two overtimes, and a last second three pointer for the Spurs to get their win. Heading back to Oakland, the Warriors have to be feeling good about themselves, home court advantage in their pocket and all the momentum on their side.

On the other side, the Spurs have to be wondering exactly what their next step will be in reclaiming their favored status. They’ve struggled to consistently produce points against a Warriors’ defense that has closed off the paint. Golden State’s ability to switch screens has left the Spurs’ motion attack devoid of the ball movement that they typically roast teams with. In response the Spurs — especially in game 2 — became more dependent on an isolation style that only led to 14 assists (in the regular season they averaged 25 a game).

And when they did isolate, they had trouble scoring against the versatility of the Warriors’ long, active wing defenders. For the series, when Klay Thompson, Harrison Barnes, and Draymond Green share the floor the Warriors’ defensive efficiency (points allowed per 100 possessions) is 85.5 per Backed up by bruising big men Andrew Bogut and Festus Ezili, the Golden State’s perimeter defense has been fantastic.

Combine the Spurs’ offensive struggles with the Warriors’ ability to generate good looks on the other end of the floor and it’s not hard to see why the Spurs are in this predicament.

All is not lost for San Antonio, however. While the Warriors have seemingly solved the puzzle of how to slow down the Spurs’ attack, there are still adjustments that can be made. Quicker ball reversals out of their standard pick and roll sets can create good match ups on the weak side. When Tony Parker looks to attack off Tim Duncan screens, he can quickly swing the ball back to Duncan who can then run a secondary pick and roll with the wing on the opposite side of the floor — especially when that player is Manu Ginobili (who needs to find the range on his jumper quickly after needing 32 shots to score 28 points in the first two games).

This type of quick ball movement combined with screen actions can get the Warriors’ bigs moving side to side while also limiting the effectiveness of defensive switches.

Further, the Spurs can simply do what they’ve done all year by hitting some of the open shots they’re getting. In game 2, several uncontested jumpers clanked off the rim. If the Spurs hope to loosen up the Warriors’ defense, they have to turn some of those misses into makes. This will force the Warriors to rush out to the perimeter to contest shots and allow the Spurs’ wings to attack closeouts off the dribble and get easier baskets in the paint.

Where the Spurs may have bigger issues, however, is in slowing down Golden State’s offense. Someone always seems to step up for the Warriors — in game 1 it was Curry, game 2 it was Thompson — and that makes them difficult to scout and even harder to fully stop defensively.

The plan can start with forcing Curry to penetrate to finish rather than allowing him to take the deep jumpers he prefers to launch. Curry is a below average finisher at the rim and while those shots can often lead to offensive rebounds, it’s best to force him into positions where he’s less effective. If the Spurs need to pick their poison, 2nd chance opportunities from guys like Carl Landry or Festus Ezeli are less dangerous than a lava-hot Curry from behind the arc.

Similarly, they must run Thompson off the three point line and force him into help defenders where his shot will be better challenged. If Thompson and Curry can both be moderately controlled — a tough task, for sure — the Warriors chances of winning go down tremendously. That is unless Barnes, Green, and Jack aren’t making the majority of their shots.

And maybe that’s the Spurs’ biggest problem going into game 3. The Warriors, through their 8 playoff games, have proven to have enough fire power to score points even if one of their best players struggles. The Spurs, meanwhile, weren’t tested in the first round and are just now running into a quality opponent who can stretch them on both sides of the ball.

So while there is, theoretically, plenty of series left for the Spurs to figure things out, the time is now for them to start to make inroads. Another loss tonight will not bode well if they hope to advance to the conference finals for the second straight year.