Dan Feldman

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Sixers: Markelle Fultz’s injury not serious, but he’s out for rest of summer league

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Markelle Fultz hurt his ankle at summer league.

But this injury won’t put him in line with Nerlens Noel, Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons as 76ers first-round picks to miss their rookie year.

76ers:

Missing 1-2 weeks in the middle of the offseason is no big deal. This is more noteworthy only because Fultz’s recovery period will come during summer league, his highest-profile developmental opportunity.

But he’ll be back in the (emptier) gym in a couple weeks, readying for the season.

Report: Pacers signing-and-trading C.J. Miles to Raptors for Cory Joseph

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The Raptors just shed an overpaid, too-often injured wing in DeMarre Carroll.

Now, they’re getting a cheaper, more effective replacement in C.J. Miles.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

At that price, Miles would have fit into the non-taxpayer mid-level exception. Though using that exception would have hard-capped Toronto, so will receiving someone in a sign-and-trade.

So, why deal Cory Joseph here instead of signing Miles outright?

Perhaps, the Raptors plan to use the mid-level exception on someone else. The hard cap will limit their ability to use the whole exception. Precisely how much they can spend depends on Kyle Lowry‘s and Serge Ibaka‘s contract structures. But there’s still flexibility for Toronto to add another productive player.

On one hand, I’m somewhat skeptical the Raptors will pay to add another player, because they could easily go the other way and dodge the luxury tax altogether. On the other hand, again, trading Joseph for only Miles seems illogical if not preserving the mid-level exception for someone else.

Joseph is a solid player who will compete with recently signed Darren Collison for minutes at point guard in Indiana. The Pacers refuse to tank, though acquiring the 25-year-old Joseph’s Bird Rights – he likely opts out next summer – could prove valuable long-term.

At a $7.63 million salary, Joseph was probably more of a luxury than Toronto could afford. Delon Wright was waiting in the wings, and he’ll ascend into the rotation as Lowry’s backup.

But Joseph is a relatively young high-end backup on a reasonable contract. I’d think the Raptors could have gotten some return, at least a second-rounder, by trading him somewhere. Again, the Raptors had the means to sign Miles outright rather than trading with Indiana. Maybe the Pacers are sending Toronto an asset that hasn’t yet been reported.

Miles will help the Raptors, especially because they had Wright ready to assume Joseph’s role (and Fred VanVleet ready to assume Wright’s as third point guard). Instead of relying on a smallish wing combination of DeMar DeRozan and Norman Powell, Toronto can start Miles with DeRozan. Like Carroll, Miles can also play some small-ball four.

This deal probably won’t become official until Toronto completes its trade with the Nets, which can’t happen until the Wizards pass Otto Porter on his physical and complete matching his offer sheet.

Lakers shut down Brandon Ingram for rest of summer league

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If it’s not one thing for the Lakers in summer league (Lonzo Ball‘s lousy debut), it’s another (Brandon Ingram‘s injury).

Lakers:

Ingram continuing to practice says it all. This is abundantly cautious, not a serious long-term concern.

It is a missed developmental opportunity, but it’s not the only one – just the most public one – Ingram will have this summer. Like Ball, Ingram will be fine.

NBA fines Joel Embiid for ‘inappropriate language on social media’

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Joel Embiid to his Instagram Live views: “F— LaVar Ball.”

NBA to Embiid: F— your bank account.

Embiid’s remark about LaVar Ball, the outspoken father of Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball, drew the league’s ire.

NBA release:

Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid has been fined $10,000 for using inappropriate language on social media, it was announced today by Kiki VanDeWeghe, Executive Vice President, Basketball Operations.

I don’t like the NBA fining players for their language while away from the workplace and not pertaining directly to the workplace, but the league has established the precedent for punishing lewdness on social media. If the union were going to fight these fines, it probably would have already happened.

Rockets sign James Harden to largest contract extension in NBA history

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In 2015, Damian Lillard signed a contract extension that – once he made All-NBA in 2016 and the 2016-17 salary cap landed even higher than expected – became worth $139,888,445 over five years.

James Harden will surpass than on a four-year extension.

Rockets release:

Houston Rockets Owner Leslie Alexander announced today that the team has signed guard James Harden to a four-year contract extension which will run through the 2022-23 season.

“It’s my pleasure to announce we’ve reached agreement with James Harden on a long term contract extension.  Since he arrived in Houston, James has exhibited the incredible work ethic, desire to win, and passion to be the best that has made him one of the most unique and talented superstars in the history of the game,” said Alexander.  “Additionally, the commitment he has shown to our organization, the City of Houston, and Rockets fans all over the world makes him a perfect leader in our pursuit of another championship.  I’m very happy for James, his mother Monja, and their family on this exciting day.”

“Houston is home for me,” said Harden. “Mr. Alexander has shown he is fully committed to winning and my teammates and I are going to keep putting in the work to get better and compete for the title.”

Harden will earn $28,299,399 and $30,421,854 the next two seasons. An extension would kick in for 2019-20, and the exact amount of a max extension won’t be known until that season’s cap is determined.

The latest projection: $169 million over four years.

The Rockets were always going to offer this megadeal. The only question was whether Harden would sign now or wait another year, when he could add five years and a projected $219 million to his current contract as long as he made an All-NBA team next year. (The salary structure over the first four years would be identical to what’s on the table now.)

Harden is Houston’s franchise player – providing not only superstar production, but a superstar presence that lures other stars. The Rockets and Harden have built their identities around each other, a mutual commitment solidified by this landmark extension.

This is in part a message to Chris Paul: Stay in Houston, and Harden will be there. Paul, an unrestricted free agent next summer, will know completely what he’d be buying into.

To some degree, “largest extension in NBA history” is an arbitrary designation. Stephen Curry signed a new five-year contract worth $201 million.

But this is emblematic of the relationship between Harden and the Rockets. Harden was already paid plenty (leaving no incentive to delay an extension and use a low cap hold), and Houston is committed to Harden (meaning no delay in locking him up longer). Now, Harden is reciprocating that faith in him – and earning a lot of money.