Dan Feldman

NEW ORLEANS - FEBRUARY 16:  NBA legend B.J. Armstrong participates in the Haier Shooting Stars competition, part of 2008 NBA All-Star Weekend at the New Orleans Arena on February 16, 2008 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
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Draymond Green’s agent, B.J. Armstrong: NBA changes rules to increase revenue, not improve quality of play

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Now that he got Donatas Motiejunas an offer sheet from the Nets, agent B.J. Armstrong can lodge back-in-my-day complaints on behalf of another client.

This time, it’s Draymond Green.

The Warriors forward has come under increased scrutiny for his unnatural acts, a new area of emphasis by the NBA’s competition committee. Green vigorously defended himself, but Armstrong goes even further.

Armstrong, via Sam Amick of USA Today:

“The fact that everyone is trying to cover their positions or justifying why they did what they did, the (league’s perspective) was kind of disappointing from this viewpoint: Since I’ve been a part of this league, I can’t recall when they’ve actually made rules that have actually helped to improve the game of basketball,” Armstrong, whose client was given a Flagrant-1 foul when he kicked Houston Rockets star James Harden on Thursday, told USA TODAY Sports by phone.

“Every move has been made with some motive, to make the game look a certain way, to speed the game up, to do all of these things. But what, when the competition committee — whoever those people are — what have they actually done to improve the game of basketball? … Not to put more people in the stands, not to make the game more appealing for people globally. What has been done to improve the game of basketball? That’s it. That’s it. That’s my only question.”

The competition committee is comprised of two owners, four general managers, three head coaches and a players-union representative.

To the bigger point: What improves the game of basketball? That’s such a subjective standard. Creating a pleasing product that appeals to customers seems like a good start. I sense Armstrong – who won three championships with the Bulls in the 1990s – believes it’s making the game look like when he played.

Yup, to Armstrong, those grind-it-out, clog-the-paint games of the 90s were preferable to today’s contest. And that’s a fine opinion. Even I have a fondness for those 90s games.

But most fans disagree, and the NBA is a business trying to attract fans – which makes Armstrong’s complaints absurd.

At least until you remember he’s just an agent sticking up for his client. Then, it all makes sense.

Grizzlies sign guard Toney Douglas under NBA’s hardship rule

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS - APRIL 06:  Toney Douglas #16 of the New Orleans Pelicans drives against Amir Johnson #90 of the Boston Celtics during the first quarter at TD Garden on April 6, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The Memphis Grizzlies have signed guard Toney Douglas under the NBA’s hardship rule.

The Grizzlies announced the move Monday, a week after Mike Conley broke several bones on the vertebrae of his lower back. Conley will not have surgery but is expected to miss at least six weeks.

The 6-foot-2, 195-pound Douglas has started 65 of his career 370 games during a seven-year career with the New York Knicks, Houston, Sacramento, Golden State, Miami and New Orleans. He played 10 of his 15 postseason games in Miami with Memphis coach David Fizdale.

Douglas was the 29th pick overall by the Lakers in 2009 out of Florida State.

Conley joined Chandler Parsons, James Ennis and Brandan Wright on the Grizzlies’ lengthy injury list.

Memphis plays at New Orleans on Monday night.

NBA: Grizzlies got away with two fouls in final minute of three-point win over Lakers

Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram (14), Memphis Grizzlies guard Tony Allen (9), and Lakers guard Jordan Clarkson (6) look on as the ball heads out of bounds in the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)
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The Grizzlies were down Mike Conley, Chandler Parsons, James Ennis, Zach Randolph, Brandan Wright and Vince Carter against the Lakers on Saturday.

But Memphis got a little outside help in its 103-100 win – from the late-game officiating.

The Grizzlies got away with two loose-ball fouls in the final minute, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report.

(The report also notes a third incorrect call: Jordan Clarkson getting away with a travel with 1:33 left. But the Lakers didn’t score on that possession, anyway).

With 30.7 seconds left, Tony Allen got away with committing a loose-ball foul on Brandon Ingram:

Allen (MEM) clamps Ingram’s (LAL) arm and affects his ability to retrieve the rebound.

A correct call would’ve put Memphis into the penalty and sent Ingram – who has made 77% of his free throws – to the line for two attempts. Instead, though they got the ball after the rebound scrum, the Lakers came up empty on their possession.

Then, Marc Gasol also got away with committing a loose-ball foul on Luol Deng with 3.5 seconds left:

Gasol (MEM) dislodges Deng (LAL) affecting his ability to retrieve the rebound.

Again, a correct call would’ve given the Lakers two free throws. Deng is shooting 70% this season and 77% for his career from the line.

Instead, Gasol grabbed the game-clinching rebound.

The game obviously would have played out differently if these calls were made correctly. But, as it stands, the Lakers missed out on four free throws from solid shooters in the final minute of a three-point loss.

Rajon Rondo reportedly threw towel toward Bulls assistant during game, and they feuded more after

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The Bulls suspended Rajon Rondo for tonight’s game against the Trail Blazers for conduct detrimental to the team.

But what does that really mean?

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Rondo had an emotional exchange with an assistant coach during and after Saturday’s loss to the Mavericks, according to a source. One source said Rondo threw a towel in the direction of associate head coach Jim Boylen during the game and the situation escalated postgame.

Rondo has already apologized to the coaching staff and his teammates, the source said. He met with coach Fred Hoiberg on Sunday and also attended a team function that day.

Rondo has long been notoriously difficult to coach. That reputation has only intensified in recent years as his play has declined, which is probably not a coincidence. Struggling on the court – Rondo had two points, two assists and five turnovers against Dallas – will only lead to frustration. Plus, tolerance for players acting out exists on a sliding scale with their ability.

But it’s also worth noting teammate Jimmy Butler and coach Fred Hoiberg continue to speak positively about Rondo:

Butler said following Monday’s shootaround that Rondo “has been great” during his stint with the Bulls.

“I think this is just another bump in the road,” Butler said. “He’s a phenomenal damn teammate and I back him on everything.

Hoiberg refused to get into details about the suspension but echoed Butler’s opinion on Rondo’s stint with the Bulls.

“Rajon, as we’ve all said, has been great,” Hoiberg said. “A great teammate. I’ve enjoyed the relationship that we developed, and … it’s not going to change moving forward.’’

This could explain why Rondo got a one-game suspension for throwing a towel at a coach when Markieff Morris, who was already feuding with the Suns, got two games just last year (as could the fact that Chicago is not Phoenix and can administer discipline differently).

Player-coach feuds happen over a long season. The reaction is often telling. Some get ignored. Some result in suspensions.

The Bulls are treating this like an isolated incident from an otherwise model player – but a situation serious enough to warrant a suspension. Rondo will eventually prove that approach right or wrong.

Matt Barnes’ rep says Kings forward acted in self-defense in nightclub fight

SACRAMENTO, CA - OCTOBER 27:  Matt Barnes #22 of the Sacramento Kings looks to pass the ball against the San Antonio Spurs during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game at Golden 1 Center on October 27, 2016 in Sacramento, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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New York police reportedly want to question Kings forward Matt Barnes over a nightclub fight early this morning.

What happened between Barnes, teammate DeMarcus Cousins and other clubgoers?

TMZ:

A rep for the NBA star tells us … Barnes was having a good time at Avenue Nightclub with his teammate, DeMarcus Cousins, when he went to sit at his VIP booth and accidentally “butt bumped” a woman who was at the next booth over.

Barnes claims the woman reacted by slapping him in the face, hard — and that’s when all hell broke loose.

Barnes claims the woman’s crew — which included several men — jumped in and began to get violent. Barnes was knocked to the ground in the melee and one of the men began to choke him.

We’re told Barnes got physical in an effort to protect himself. Cousins also jumped in to defend Barnes.

We spoke with  Barnes’ attorney Alex Spiro who tells us, “We do not believe a crime was committed and are hopeful no charges will be pressed.”

By this telling, it sounds as if a crime was committed – with Barnes as the victim. I have no idea whether this account is accurate – what else would Barnes’ representation say? – and it’s reasonable for Barnes not to desire charges even against the other side. But it’s a little strange to hear Barnes’ lawyer give the other side such a quick reprieve while Barnes’ camp circulates this story of Barnes as a clear victim.