Dan Feldman

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 17:  Donatas Motiejunas #20 of the Houston Rockets is fouled as he shoots by Julius Randle #30 of the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half at Staples Center on December 17, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Harry How/Getty Images

Donatas Motiejunas lets Rockets’ qualifying offer expire


Unsurprisingly, the deadline for Donatas Motiejunas‘ qualifying offer prompted last-ditch negotiations between him and the Rockets.

Somewhat more surprisingly, but far from unexpected, Motiejunas didn’t sign.

Calvin Watkins of ESPN:

The $4.4 million qualifying offer the Rockets sent to power forward Donatas Motiejunas has expired.

Motiejunas remains a restricted free agent. He just can’t unilaterally accept his one-year, $4,433,683 qualifying offer.

If I were the Rockets, I’d immediately lower the offer to him. An offer sheet from another team must be for at least two years, and teams will be reluctant to commit multiple years to someone with such worrisome back issues. (A multi-year offer sheet with only one guaranteed season could make sense, though I don’t know whether Motiejunas would want such a deal.) If the market pegs Motiejunas a player deserving a one-year contract, Houston has it corned. No need to bid against itself.

It was one thing for Tristan Thompson to let his qualifying offer expire last year. He was always going to make at least that amount. The only question was the exact figure.

Motiejunas’ next salary is much more fluid, and he’s taking a major risk by letting the qualifying offer expire.

Report: Ben Simmons expected to miss about three months

CAMDEN, NJ - SEPTEMBER 26: Ben Simmons #25 of the Philadelphia 76ers poses for a picture during media day on September 26, 2016 in Camden, New Jersey. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

No. 1 pick Ben Simmons injured his foot, but the 76ers have yet to reveal a timeline for his return.

Is this good or bad news?

Jeff Goodman of ESPN:

Philadelphia plays 33 games before the calendar year ends, which would put Simmons in line with the 76ers other recent first-round picks. Nerlens Noel (82 games), Joel Embiid (82 games) and Jahlil Okafor (29 games) all missed significant chunks of their first pro seasons.

At least Simmons would have a chance to get back on the court and develop. That’s the priority, with Philadelphia likely remaining lousy with or without him.

Bryan Colangelo: 76ers had losing culture

Dwayne Casey
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Frank Gunn

Sam Hinkie’s Process made sense on paper. Get young, lose, draft high, repeat until the 76ers stockpiled enough talent to surge forward with a clean cap sheet.

But the Process didn’t unfold on paper, and there was always a catch. What damage would years of losing do to the organization and the real people within it?

We know some of the fallout. The Process embarrassed ownership, leading to Hinkie’s ouster. It also – according to Hinkie’s replacement, Bryan Colangelo, – created a toxic environment.

Colangelo, via The Vertical Podcast with Woj:

Really, factually, there was a losing culture. There was a losing mindset.

It had been ingrained partly because of the undertaking of rebuilding that they had been going through. And it’s a byproduct of the rebuilding process, if you will. You’re going to lose some games along the way, and it becomes part of the fabric of the team and the organization.

And I think more than anything the mindset needed to shift. The mindset needed to change. And that’s why we’ve been talking about winning and doing everything to promote winning, promote a culture of excellence, to promote better thought process in everything.

Keep in mind, the worse the 76ers are perceived at the time Colangelo took over, the better he’ll look.

But there was real evidence of a bad culture – from Jahlil Okafor‘s fighting to Joel Embiid‘s coachability to Nerlens Noel‘s tardiness. Players knew maximum focus and effort wouldn’t result in winning anyway, so that made it easier for bad habits to develop. Those bad habits can be contagious. Try as he might, coach Brett Brown couldn’t stem the tide.

Colangelo is trying to go a different way, bringing in veterans like Elton Brand, Gerald Henderson and Jerryd Bayless. Philadelphia won’t have as many roster spots for young players with upside, and those vets occupy cap space. But, right or wrong, Colangelo identified a problem and is trying to fix it.

Matt Barnes says he’s been warned for chewing gum, using bathroom during national anthem

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - MARCH 19:  NBA players Matt Barnes and J.J. Redick attend the David Yurman in-store shopping event to celebrate the launch of Men's Faceted Metal Collection at David Yurman Boutique on March 19, 2015 in Beverly Hills, California.  (Photo by Angela Weiss/Getty Images for David Yurman)
Angela Weiss/Getty Images for David Yurman

The NBA has long taken a hard stance on the national anthem.

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf was infamously suspended for sitting during the national anthem 1996. The league has a specific rule  – which it doesn’t plan to change – that states, “Players, coaches and trainers are to stand and line up in a dignified posture along the sidelines or on the foul line during the playing of the National Anthem.”

That makes it more difficult for the NBA and union to compromise on national-anthem protests – especially because precedent has set a strict tone on the rule.

Kings forward Matt Barnes on The Vertical Podcast with JJ Redick:

They don’t want you chewing gum. They told me, take the gum out of your mouth.

I was using the bathroom. They said you can’t miss the anthem. I’m like, “Man, I had to pee.” “Next time you’ll be fined.” I said, “Ohh, OK.”

I doubt NBA commissioner Adam Silver wants to punish players for demonstrating on behalf of important social issues. But he’s also behold to the team owners and corporate sponsors, and he must enforce the league’s rules.

It’s a fine line, one that the NBA’s prior warnings on national-anthem conduction make even more difficult for Silver to walk.

Maybe the solution is raised fists? Kneeling, like Colin Kaepernick, would seem to violate the “stand” requirement. But if players are on their feet and in place, would the league really deem a raised fist an undignified posture?

Chris Bosh on Heat’s young talent: ‘It’s their time’

CHARLOTTE, NC - APRIL 23:  Chris Bosh #1 of the Miami Heat talks to teammates Justise Winslow #20 and Udonis Haslem #40 against the Charlotte Hornets during game three of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena on April 23, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Justise Winslow eventually wants his own team.

That day may be here.

LeBron James is with the Cavaliers. Dwyane Wade is with the Bulls. And now Chris Bosh – the last of the Heat’s big three still in Miami, embroiled in a dispute with the team over his health that likely has him moving on from Miami (and he’s not thrilled about it).

That said, Bosh sounds ready to defer to a younger generation led by Winslow and Hassan Whiteside.

In introducing his latest video, Bosh wrote this on his personal website:

I remember just a few years ago when the Big 3 were together and we were having a ball playing the game we love with some of the most professional, talented guys the NBA has ever seen.

I remember the fans of Miami coming out to see the show every night. The love, the compassion and the energy we felt was second to none. I want to thank the city of Miami from the bottom of my heart because things may change but the good times will last forever in my memories. Thank you!

Things are different now and Miami has incredible young talent with a tremendous upside. These are not only talented ball players but great people and friends. I enjoyed playing with those guys and doing my best to mentor them by being an upstanding role model and veteran player. It’s their time to go through the ups and downs of the game with this great city.

Bosh is not accepting that his career is over.

However, he sounds like a guy who likes the Heat’s young stars.