Dan Feldman

French international Jonathan Jeanne entering, staying in 2017 NBA draft

1 Comment

College basketball players essentially reveal their intent to stay in the NBA draft by hiring an agent, which renders the player ineligible for college basketball. At that point, there’s no reason to withdraw from the draft.

International players don’t have the same way to show their plans. As long as they declare for the draft by Sunday, they can withdraw by June 12 and play in foreign leagues, which don’t disqualify players for hiring agents.

So, the only way international players can show they’ll stay in the draft is saying so – which Jonathan Jeanne did.

Jonathan Givony of DraftExpress:

Jeanne is a borderline first-rounder, probably more likely to go in the second. The French center will turn 20 in July, putting him in line with many sophomores.

He’s 7-foot-2 with a 7-foot-7 wingspan, and he’s fast for his size. That rare combination is enough to intrigue.

His speed will be important offensively, because Jeanne is toothpick thin. He’ll need to beat defenders to his spot, because otherwise, he’ll get bumped off it.

Jeanne blocks plenty of shots, given his size. Again, he’ll need to fill out in a major way before making a major impact.

Bucks coach Jason Kidd on Giannis Antetokounmpo: ‘I wish I was 7 feet tall. He’s better than I am’

Jason Miller/Getty Images
3 Comments

MILWAUKEE (AP) — While catching his breath during a break along the sideline, the Milwaukee Bucks’ star pupil put his arms on his hips and leaned his 6-foot-11 frame over to listen to coach Jason Kidd.

Giannis Antetokounmpo is learning the nuances of running a team from one of the best point guards and triple-double threats in NBA history.

Give it a little more time, Kidd says. The fun is only just beginning with the 22-year-old Antetokounmpo.

“The big thing is we gave him the ball and his appetite is big,” Kidd said.

It was only in February 2016 that Kidd assigned Antetokounmpo to be a primary ball-handler. His career has taken off, much like one of his soaring dunks.

In his fourth year in the league, Antetokounmpo turned into an All-Star this season after averaging career highs of 22.9 rebounds, 8.7 rebounds and 5.4 assists. He ranked in the top 20 in the league in total points, rebounds, blocks, assists and steals, an NBA first.

“He wants to learn. He wants to be a point guard,” Kidd said. “He wants to have the ball and help make decisions, be involved in the play.”

It’s hard to miss the towering player who can breeze by defenders to the hoop, pass out of double-teams and make stops at the other end . He has been the best player so far for the Bucks, who take a 2-1 lead in their first-round playoff series against Toronto into Game 4 on Saturday.

The 6-foot-4 Kidd had an all-around skill set of his own back when he was playing, though he didn’t have Antetokounmpo’s imposing length and height.

“I wish I was 7 feet tall,” Kidd said. “He’s better than I am.”

Not quite yet.

Kidd averaged 12.6 points, 6.3 rebounds and 8.7 assists in a nearly two-decade NBA career that ended in 2013. His 107 career triple-doubles are third in league history behind All-Stars Oscar Robertson (181) and Magic Johnson (138).

Kidd could step back and hit 3s. He created in transition. His court awareness gave him a distinct advantage over opponents.

Now he’s passing that knowledge on to Antetokounmpo, and Kidd isn’t that far removed from his playing days so he can relate to a team with a young core.

“He puts himself in our shoes because he was in our shoes,” Antetokounmpo said. “It helps a lot because taking tips from J-Kidd – he was a player that was one of the best that’s ever done.”

Antetokounmpo has professed to having a lighthearted moment of doubt about Kidd at one point during the coach’s first season in 2014-5 after being pulled from a game. A native of Greece, Antetokounmpo had to look up his coach’s credentials online. They checked out.

“It’s really easy to accept (Kidd’s mentoring) because he’s been in my shoes. He knows how I feel right now,” he said.

Team President Peter Feigin described a close relationship between player and coach bonded in part by what he called a shared “maniacal focus” to be the best. Antetokounmpo has spent long days and nights at the team’s practice facility in a quiet Milwaukee suburb.

“There’s a tremendous amount of mutual respect,” team co-owner Wes Edens said. “You can’t really put a label on Giannis as a basketball player … but you can really see culturally he fits the model of a Jason Kidd player. He plays at both ends.”

He’s already a matchup nightmare for opposing coaches, including Toronto’s Dwane Casey.

“As far as keeping him off the free throw line we have to make sure we give him space. Challenge late. We have to mix that up and start trapping him also because he is getting where he wants to go,” Casey said. “We have to give him different looks.”

Perhaps one of the next steps for the Bucks is regularly taking advantage of the extra attention that Antetokounmpo draws on the court. It happened in the Bucks’ 104-77 rout of Toronto in Game 3, when defenders were drawn by Antetokounmpo’s every move to open up room for teammates.

Antetokounmpo finished with 19 points, eight rebounds and four rebounds, fairly pedestrian numbers for him. But six Bucks scored in double figures.

“He’s still just understanding the point guard position and understanding how to run the team, how to carry a team, and what that means with not scoring … or what the team needs at what time during the game,” Kidd said.

“He’s picked up a lot of those things quickly,” he added, “but he still has a long ways to go.”

 

Rajon Rondo on apparent trip of Jae Crowder: Just stretching my leg after ACL tear

1 Comment

While sitting on the Bulls bench, an injured Rajon Rondo looked like he might have been trying to trip Celtics forward Jae Crowder – particularly eyebrow-raising given Rondo’s history.

Rondo in his post-game press conference:

When you tear an ACL, your legs get stiff on you every once in a while. Then, I stretch my leg out. I always do that throughout our game. I guess e was so deep into our bench, it looked like whatever may have happened.

I initially gave Rondo the benefit of the doubt. It seemed he extended his leg casually and after Crowder ran by.

And maybe this is unfair – Rondo has a great memory, someone could have warned him he’d receive this question, the incident might have stuck out because it shocked him as an accident close call – but Rondo’s explanation seems too meticulous.

Russell Westbrook changes conversation in win over Rockets

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki
3 Comments

The Great Russell Westbrook Debate can shift topics. “Is he clutch enough” is the new “Is he too selfish?”

Westbrook went 3-of-6 on free throws down the stretch, and the Thunder blew a 10-point lead in the final minutes. But James Harden missed a 3-pointer just before the buzzer, allowing Oklahoma City to escape with a 115-113 Game 3 win over the Rockets on Friday.

“I’ve got to make a free throw,” Westbrook grumbled to begin his on-court interview before seemingly realizing stewing was a bad look and expressed pleasure his team trimmed the series deficit to 2-1.

And, yes, Westbrook clearly cares how he looks, no matter what pretenses he puts up.

His cartoonish fourth quarter of Game 2 – shooting 4-for-18 while his teammates shot 3-for-11 – invited deep criticism of his ball-hogging. Westbrook showed a different approach from the jump tonight, making a concerted effort to find his teammates. He had eight assists in the first half and 11 through three quarters.

Even though Westbrook added no assists in the fourth quarter, he kept looking for his teammates – sometimes to a fault. They just didn’t connect.

Houston cut the margin during an excruciating few minutes Westbrook began the final period during the bench. Even as the Rockets went on a late 15-5 to tie it, Westbrook sought floor balance.

His teammates reveled in his faith in them. They made 9-of-18 3-pointers, and Westbrook — who was 5-for-22 from beyond the arc in the first two games — attempted only one. Steven Adams tipped in a Westbrook miss with 35 seconds left to put Oklahoma City up good, though Westbrook’s dicey free-throw shooting kept it tense.

Like every game in this series, it will be seen as a referendum in the already-decided, not-yet-revealed MVP race. The final lines:

  • Westbrook: 32 points on 24 shots and 10-of-14 free throw shooting, 13 rebounds, 11 assists, three steals, five turnovers, W
  • Harden: 44 points 21 shots and 18-of-18 free throw shooting, six rebounds, six assists, seven turnovers, L

Both players will insist the final letter is most important, but Harden can bank on a couple of those Ws from Games 1 and 2. The Thunder still have their back against the wall.

This felt like a team energized by its first home playoff game of the year, though Billy Donovan made some smart adjustments – mainly tightening his rotation, including deactivating second-string point guard Semaj Christon.

The Thunder will go as far as Westbrook takes them, and tonight, that was to their first playoff win without Kevin Durant since moving to Oklahoma City.

Now, it’s Harden’s turn to answer.

Gregg Popovich on Grizzlies starting Zach Randolph: ‘We’ve played against Zach 14 hundred and 73 times’

Andy Lyons/Getty Images
Leave a comment

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — (AP) Zach Randolph, the self-described blue collar forward in a blue collar town, always gives the Grizzlies whatever they need.

No complaints. Just check in when called upon and scrap for rebounds and buckets.

Even when relegated to coming off the bench after being a starter throughout his long career, Randolph never griped about playing fewer minutes.

Randolph is answering the bell again for his Grizzlies, as only he can.

“We needed Z Bo in the starting lineup for this series” against San Antonio, first-year Memphis coach David Fizdale said Friday. “This series called for that, so that’s why I moved that direction. If it was a team that was running circles around us from the 3-point line and a whole lot of speed and space, he probably wouldn’t be in the lineup right now.”

Yes, these Grizzlies needed some of that old Grit `n’ Grind. The physical, pounding style of play that helped them reach the playoffs the last six seasons.

With the Spurs shoving the Grizzlies all over the court in the first two games of their opening playoff series, Fizdale had to make a move. He put Randolph back in the starting lineup to give the Grizzlies some needed muscle to push back.

Randolph responded with 21 points and eight rebounds, and the Grizzlies will need much more of the same from the 15-year veteran to keep the Spurs from “bullying” their way through the rest of this best-of-seven series.

To the 6-foot-9 and 260-pound Randolph, all that matters is that he is at his best banging under the basket, pushing and leaning against opponents while somehow finding the right angle to toss up a short jumper or grab a loose ball.

“I’m going to go out there and just play hard and leave it all on the court,” Randolph said. “So playing more minutes is what I’ve been wanting to do, and I’m getting a chance.”

Even while coming off the bench , Randolph still led all reserves with 19 double-doubles during the season.

Randolph reminded everyone Thursday night that he hasn’t lost his touch. He put on a show helping Memphis snap a 10-game postseason skid against the Spurs with a 105-94 victory and pull within 2-1. Randolph knocked down step-back jumpers, hook shots and even threw in a rare dunk while grabbing eight rebounds.

“We’ve played against Zach 14 hundred and 73 times,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said, adding that Randolph has always been a heck of a player so “it’s not a whole lot different.”

LaMarcus Aldridge battled against Randolph in the 2015 playoffs while with Portland and knows exactly what to expect with the man nicknamed Z Bo back in the starting lineup.

“You got to battle,” Aldridge said. “It’s a fight down there. You got to battle, and you’re going to try to do your work early and just battle him the whole game.”

Grizzlies guard Mike Conley said it was fun with Randolph having so much success.

“We finally unleashed him,” Conley said. “He really changed the game and hopefully changed the series and will give us some confidence.”

Randolph is a free agent this summer, so Saturday night’s Game 4 could be the last in Memphis for the man loved for both his play on the court and charity work away from the arena. Randolph said that has crossed his mind, especially now with the regular season over and the postseason just two losses away right now.

“You try to put that behind you and when it’s time for that, you take care of that,” Randolph said. “First task at hand is trying to win a championship.”