Nerlens Noel

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Nerlens Noel hanging on thread of Mavericks rotation

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Nerlens Noel‘s last four games:

  • Six minutes
  • DNP-CD
  • Two minutes
  • Five minutes

Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle, via Tim MacMahon of ESPN:

“Look, minutes have to be earned,” Carlisle said. “At this point, if it’s between him and Salah, Salah has earned the minutes. There’s no doghouse here. There just isn’t. It’s pretty simple: You compete, and if you earn minutes, you get minutes. And you’ve got to compete to keep them, because it’s a competitive situation.”

Noel, via MacMahon:

“I’m good, I’m good,” Noel said. “I’m a very self-confident player. I know I can go in there and change games. When my number is called, I’ll do just that and help some winning efforts. That’s all my play style is about, is just winning. When I’m called on, I’ll bring my winning effort.”

The Mavericks reportedly thought Noel was worth $17.5 million annually last summer. Now, he can barely get playing time on a 2-13 team?

This is why players who sign the qualifying offer, like Noel did last summer, rarely re-sign the following offseason.

Noel makes a lot of plays defensively – some good, some bad. He needs playing time to refine his impressive tools. If they had him locked up long-term, the Mavericks probably would have more interest in developing him. As is, they could be leery of helping him just so another team reaps the rewards next season.

Though he’s saying all the right things, Noel would rightfully be frustrated by this situation. He has only one year to prove himself before unrestricted free agency, and he’s mostly stuck to the bench. The team with his Bird Rights, intentionally or not, is suppressing his value.

Dallas has a surplus of centers: Noel, Dirk Nowitzki, Salah Mejri, Dwight Powell and Jeff Withey. Mejri is playing very well right now, and Nowitzki is grandfathered minutes.

Noel will eventually get more playing time. Perhaps, this tough love benefits him long-term.

But this isn’t pretty right now.

Former Cavs’ GM David Griffin on drafting Anthony Bennett No. 1: “You f–k up sometimes”

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“This is a SHOCKER. Nobody had this.”

That is what I wrote in our instant draft analysis back in 2013 when the Cleveland Cavaliers drafted Anthony Bennett No. 1. Bennett was considered a lottery pick by most teams, but teams had him more in the 7-13 range. Out of UNLV, Bennett was an athletic guy with a lot of questions. It wasn’t a great draft, but the Cavaliers took Bennett in front of Victor Oladipo, Otto Porter, Nerlens Noel, C.J. McCollum, and Ben McLemore, to name a few. We all know what happened from there, Bennett played just 151 games across four NBA seasons and is already out of the league (he was in training camp with the Suns this year but was released). He is the poster child of a draft bust.

Former Cavs’ GM David Griffin — who was the No. 2 guy behind Chris Grant back in 2013 in Cleveland — owns up to the mistake in Jason Lloyd of The Athletic’s new book  The Blueprint: LeBron James, Cleveland’s Deliverance and the Making of the Modern NBA. An excerpt is up at the Athletic.

So when the Cavs front office sat down before the draft to cast their vote on who to take, the final tally was 9-1 in favor of Bennett. The one vote against taking him? Chris Grant…

“The issue with Anthony was, and we had no way of knowing it at the time, the kid had no desire to overcome adversity whatsoever. As soon as it was hard, he was out,” Griffin explained to Lloyd. “His whole life, he rolled out of bed bigger, better, and more talented than everybody else. As soon as it was hard, it was over. And I was the one on campus at UNLV. I’m the one who got sold the bill of goods and I bought it hook, line, and sinker. You f–k up sometimes. But I feel bad Chris took it for that, because Chris was the one guy who wasn’t sure.”

Talking to people around a draftable player and getting a sense of their drive and work ethic is one of the most important — and most challenging — parts of being a GM. Just like for students in school or the rest of us in everyday life, grit and determination matter more than talent. The greatest have both — Michael Jordan personifies it, but from Bill Russell through LeBron James everyone in the pantheon has both — but there are a lot of guys in the NBA now who have some talent and a lot of grit, and were willing to put in the work needed to become an NBA player. J.J. Redick had the shooting skills in college, but he reshaped his body and his game to become a quality NBA two guard, and he’s just one of many examples.

Not knowing Bennett lacked grit is on the Cavaliers’ staff, but it’s always hard to predict. Projecting the future of any 19-year-old at anything is next to impossible, and that doesn’t change if you’re doing the research before making a multi-million dollar investment. He might have put in the work in college, but things changed.

(Hat Tip Bleacher Report)

With no offer on table, Jusuf Nurkic expects to be restricted free agent next summer

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What is center Jusuf Nurkic‘s value on the open market?

He certainly has value to the Trail Blazers. He played 20 games for them after Portland traded for him, and he averaged 15.2 points 10.4 rebounds, 3.2 assists, and 2 blocks per game. More importantly, Portland was 9.7 points per 100 possessions better with him on the court and went 14-6 in that stretch.

Nurkic is eligible for a contract extension, but for Portland that’s a small sample size on which to base a big contract, even if you ignore potential health concerns. The two sides talked, but no deal appears forthcoming, and Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports reports Nurkic is ready to enter restricted free agency next season.

Barring a dramatic change in talks, Portland Trail Blazers center Jusuf Nurkic plans on entering restricted free agency next summer as no contract extension offer has been made, league sources told The Vertical.

Three comments on this:

First, this is exactly what an agent trying to push for a deal says off the record to try and push the organization (and scare the fan base a little). I don’t doubt Charnia or his sources, the sides likely are nowhere near a deal, but know that every sourced story is somebody spinning something. Here, the motive seems fairly transparent.

Second, Nurkic has looked to be, and may prove to be, a vital part of the Trail Blazers core going forward — and Portland may be willing to pay big to keep him. We mentioned the raw numbers, but more important than his ability to fit with Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum on offense (and he does), he made a terrible defensive team better. That’s how the Blazers take a step forward, and he can be part of it.

Third, and this may be the biggest factor as to why there is no deal, next summer is going to be a very tight free agent market, especially for big men. Only about half a dozen teams (maybe a couple more) will have max money to spend, and only a few will need a center. On that market, as unrestricted free agents will be DeMarcus Cousins, DeAndre Jordan (unless he and the Clippers reach a deal over the weekend, which is unlikely), Greg Monroe, and Nerlens Noel, plus restricted free agents Nikola Jokic and Clint Capela. And those are just the big names. That’s a lot more supply than demand. Much like Noel and others found out the hard way this summer, there are bigs who will expect to bet paid and be very disappointed with the market for their services. Portland understands the market and may be making offers to Nurkic accordingly.

Three questions the Dallas Mavericks must answer this season

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The NBC/ProBasketballTalk season previews will ask the questions each of the 30 NBA teams must answer this season to make their season a success. We are looking at one team a day until the start of the season, and it begins with a look back at the team’s offseason moves.

Last season: 33-49, did not make playoffs

I know what you did last summer: The biggest move was drafting Dennis Smith Jr. at No. 9, a point guard who the Mavs are very high on (and who stood out at Summer League). They also re-signed the legend Dirk Nowitzki for two-years, $5 million per year, a discounted deal (with a player option for the second year). They also signed veterans Josh McRoberts and Jeff Withey,

THREE QUESTIONS THE MAVERICKS MUST ANSWER:

1) Just how good is Derrick Smith Jr.? Franchise cornerstone good? Dallas is rebuilding, they make no bones about it. There is going to be a season (or two) of goodbyes to the legendary Dirk Nowitzki, but this is really like the Lakers the final season of Kobe Bryant — they were selling the farewell, but for the franchise player development was what mattered. (Dirk will likely get in the way of that less than Kobe.)

How fast that rebuilding goes will start with just how good Smith is. He fell to No. 9 in part because he was coming off surgery and he was not quite himself in college, and Dallas was thrilled they had him higher on their board. By Summer League Smith felt right and was one of the most explosive rookies out there. A lot of fan bases were wondering how he slipped past them and down to ninth. Some owners were asking that, too. Is this another elite point guard who slid down the board?

Rick Carlisle will start Smith from Day 1 and has used the word cornerstone with him. Smith should be able to score, but can he do it efficiently at the next level? Can he be a playmaker? How will he handle being coached by Rick Carlisle, one of the best Xs and Os guys in the league but because of that a guy who can be hard on point guards? There are a lot of questions and it’s going to be a process, but we will start to get a sense of just how good Smith can be, and with that just how quickly the turnaround in Dallas might go.

2) Nerlens Noel bet on himself, that might be good for Dallas but is it good for Noel? Noel was one of the many players who misread the market this summer. The previous summer big men were overpaid — Bismack Biyambo got four years, $72 million; Timofey Mozgov four years, $64 million — and the athletic, shot-blocking big man thought it was his turn. When free agency opened Noel was offered four years, around $70 million — I heard that from sources and there have been multiple such reports — but when Noel asked for the max the deal went away. He ended up switching agents and singing the qualifying offer for a fraction of that money, but he will be a free agent next summer.

Noel can be a defensive force and shot blocker in the paint, but he has a limited offensive game — he can set the pick, roll, and finish an alley-oop. Think poor man’s DeAndre Jordan. However, Jordan worked because he had Chris Paul feeding him passes and knowing how to use his picks — can Noel start to develop that kind of chemistry with Smith? If so, he may have more value to the Mavs next summer. However, to start the season Noel is expected to come off the bench.

One quick aside, I doubt Noel will find a deal as good as four-years. $70 million next summer either, unless he has a breakout season. The reality is that the market is going to be tight next summer (only about eight teams will have max contract money, not all needing bigs) and on the market will be DeMarcus Cousins, maybe DeAndre Jordan (he is talking extension with the Clippers), Brook Lopez and others. By the time teams turn to Noel, there may not be much money left. It’s not 2016 anymore.

3) Can Harrison Barnes take the next step and be a good playmaker? Heading into last season, the question was if Barnes was worth the big contract — he was good as a role player in Golden State where he got good looks because of the gravity of Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, but was he ready to be the No. 1 option? The answer was yes — Dallas ran a lot of the old Nowitzki plays for Barnes and it worked. Barnes averaged 19.2 points per game, had a solid true shooting percentage of 54.1%, he was fantastic shooting late in the shot clock, and he was one of the league’s better isolation scorers — nearly a quarter of his shots came in isolation and he average 0.93 points per possession that way according to Synergy Sports (a good number). He was also strong in the post.

The question for him now is can he be a distributor, too? Barnes told NBC Sports early last season he knew that was what he needed to do, but that this was something that would take game time to learn (you can’t simulate that the same way with drills). If he and Smith can develop chemistry and get guys like Seth Curry and Wesley Matthews (when healthy) good shots, this offense can start to click. The Mavericks are not going to be a playoff team, but if Smith and Barnes have some real chemistry they get there a lot sooner.

Willie Reed claims man arrested in NCAA bribery scandal cost him $13.5 million

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From the outside, Willie Reed looked like a host of other NBA players — particularly big men — caught off guard by how fast the free agent market got tight this summer. Reed was coming off a solid season backing up Hassan Whiteside in Miami, and having seen the money thrown at big men in the summer of 2016 ($72 million for Bismack Biyambo, $64 million for Timofey Mozgov) he thought he would get paid.

Reed ended up signing a one-year minimum contract with the Clippers.

However, the NCAA recruiting and bribery scandal has brought more to light of what happened, and Reed has filed a $13.5 million arbitration claim with the union claiming he was defrauded. Reed was represented by prominent NBA agent Andy Miller, whose offices were raided by the FBI as part of the probe because he employed one of the 10 people arrested so far in the case.

Jeff Goodman and Chris Haynes of ESPN have the details.

Los Angeles Clippers center Willie Reed filed the claim in part because of Christian Dawkins, one of the 10 people arrested on federal corruption charges on Tuesday. Dawkins was reportedly terminated by Miller and his company, ASM, in early May following a National Basketball Players Association probe into the unauthorized use of a player’s personal credit card.

Dawkins, sources say, advised Reed to turn down a preliminary three-year, $15 million deal by the Miami Heat early in the free-agency juncture with the promise of a larger market opening up for his services. That never occurred.

Reed terminated his contract with Miller on the evening of July 11, sources say.

Miller reportedly fired Dawkins in May. However, this report says he continued to represent certain people for the company, including Reed. Dawkins was not certified as an agent by the players’ union and worked under the ASM banner in another role. Dawkins was tied to efforts to offer money ($100,000) to a recruit to get him to Louisville, according to the federal charges.

Whether Reed’s case was fraud or just bad advice will be up to the arbitrator. Plenty of players represented by a number of people turned down bigger deals and found there wasn’t more out there, with Nerlens Noel in Dallas at the top of the list (he had been represented by Happy Walters, and switched to Rich Paul during free agency when things went poorly).

Miller has a lengthy NBA client list headed by guys such as Kristaps Porzingis, Kyle Lowry, and Myles Turner. According to the report, a number of his clients are looking around at their representation options in the wake of these arrests.

The NBA players’ union is also looking into the allegations.