Montrezl Harrell

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Montrezl Harrell likes tweets complaining about Rockets not using him enough

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In their second-round series against the Spurs, the Rockets have used Montrezl Harrell in garbage time of Games 1, 2 and 4 and sat him entirely in Games 3 and 5. His last DNP-CD even came after backup center Nene suffered a season-ending injury.

Among Harrell’s recent Twitter likes:

There are potential caveats: Perhaps these were accidental likes, though that’s less plausible considering the volume of them. Likes aren’t necessarily endorsements. Just because Twitter calls its easiest method for tagging tweets “likes” doesn’t mean Harrell actually likes those tweets.

But the most likely explanation is that Harrell, frustrated about not playing more, wants to support those who agree with his outlook.

Which is totally fine.

Reaching the NBA requires incredible competiveness, and players can’t simply turn that off. Harrell should want to play more.

The problem is San Antonio presents a poor matchup. The 6-foot-8 Harrell’s best skill is being a big man who can switch onto the perimeter, which is less useful against the Spurs’ more-conventional system. San Antonio’s bigs would feast on him inside, his switching adding little value. Harrell wouldn’t spread the floor on the other end, allowing the Spurs to get away with their bigger lineups with few drawbacks.

That’s why Houston is relying on Clint Capela and Ryan Anderson at center. Capela has the size to battle inside with San Antonio’s bigs, and Anderson creates space offensively with his 3-point shooting.

If the Rockets, down 3-2, somehow advance and don’t play Harrell against the Warriors – against whom switching is so important – then I’ll agree with his apparent displeasure.

Rockets: Nene out for rest of playoffs

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The Rockets lost Nene to injury early in their Game 4 win over the Spurs.

Now, Houston will have to cope without him for longer.

Rockets release:

Houston Rockets center Nenê will miss the remainder of the postseason with a left adductor tear.  The Rockets medical staff is currently reviewing treatment options.  An update will be provided once a decision is made.

This series likely now diverges even more in style.

Clint Capela has the size to matchup with San Antonio’s traditional bigs – Pau Gasol, LaMarcus Aldridge, David Lee and Dewayne Dedmon – but Nene was Houston’s only other reliable option for that. Montrezl Harrell is undersized and inexperienced, and Chinanu Onuaku is even more raw. Rather than break out one of those young players, the Rockets could turn to Ryan Anderson at center. They found success with that in Game 3, but the Spurs will test Anderson’s defense more with more type to prepare.

Houston will surely counter by using Anderson’s 3-point shooting to drag a Spurs center out of the paint.

In a series that was already somewhat about big vs. small, with Nene sidelined, the differences between these teams look even more pronounced.

Russell Westbrook on Rockets laughing at Andre Roberson missing free throws: ‘Probably the guys that don’t play’

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The Rockets bench made a big production when an intentionally fouled Andre Roberson kept missing free throws in the Thunder’s Game 4 loss to the Rockets yesterday.

Russell Westbrook stuck up for his teammate.

Royce Young of ESPN:

Westbrook:

I didn’t see it. I didn’t see it at all. Probably the guys that don’t play, probably over there the ones laughing, if I had to guess.

Good guess. It appears Montrezl Harrell and Bobby Brown – whose only playing time this series came late in Houston’s blowout Game 1 win – led the jeers.

But the most important thing for the Thunder is Roberson making his free throws. They need him on the court to defend James Harden, which exposes him to hacking. If Westbrook deflecting attention onto the Rockets’ benchwarmers helps Roberson at the line, great. But if not, the Rockets will keep having reasons to laugh.

Stanley Johnson drains late three, Pistons beat Rockets 114-109

Associated Press
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HOUSTON (AP) — The Detroit Pistons gave some of their young and seldom-used players a chance to play Friday night, and it helped them beat the Houston Rockets.

Boban Marjanovic, Detroit’s 7-foot-3 backup center, led the Pistons with a career-high 27 points with 12 rebounds off the bench and Stanley Johnson hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 32.4 seconds left before adding two free throws to lift the Pistons to the 114-109 victory Friday night.

“It was great and we had a bunch of guys out there that really wanted to play,” coach Stan Van Gundy said. “They weren’t bogged down by the way the season has gone. They had great enthusiasm to play. I don’t care when it is in the year or what the situation is that’s a big part of this is just having a great enthusiasm to play and those guys just did.”

The Rockets led by two after a dunk by Montrezl Harrell before Ish Smith made a basket to tie it. James Harden missed a 3-pointer on the other end, and Johnson’s 3-pointer made it 110-107.

Harden missed another 3-point attempt, and Johnson added the free throws to make it 112-107. Harrell added a layup after that but Tobias Harris tacked on two more free throws with eight seconds left.

Harden finished one rebound shy of a triple-double with 33 points, 12 assists and nine rebounds. He said players getting rest was no excuse for what happened on Friday night.

“Whoever is in the game has to know what they’re doing on both ends of the floor,” he said. “And just go out there and try to execute.”

The Pistons used a 12-1 spurt, capped by four points from Marjanovic, to cut the lead to 94-93 midway through the fourth quarter. Houston missed seven straight shots in span before Eric Gordon ended the drought with a 3-pointer to make it 97-93.

A 3-pointer by Johnson tied it with about three minutes left before Harden made a pair of 3-pointers sandwiched around a layup by rookie Henry Ellenson to give Houston a 105-101 lead.

Ellenson finished with 15 points and 11 rebounds in his first career start.

Coach Mike D’Antoni rested starting center Clint Capela and said he’ll rest other players in the last three regular-season games after Houston clinched the third spot in the Western Conference on Wednesday.

However, Harden and Patrick Beverley won’t be among those who will sit out because they refused when he asked them.

Reggie Bullock made back to back 3-pointers early in the fourth quarter to get the Pistons within 6. But Houston made the next six points to extend its lead to 93-81.

Smith got the Pistons within 1 point with a jump shot with about nine minutes left in the third quarter before Houston used a 10-3 run, with two 3-pointers from Harden, to make it 69-61 midway through the period.

The Pistons scored seven straight points, with five from Harris, to cut the lead to 76-73 with about two minutes left in the quarter.

But Houston outscored the Pistons 9-2 the rest of the quarter to lead 87-75 entering the fourth. Lou Williams scored the seven points in that span and Harden capped the run with a reverse layup.

Houston led by as many as 11 in the first half and was up 54-52 at halftime.

TIP-INS

Pistons: Michael Gbinije missed the game with a respiratory infection. … Smith finished with 20 points. … The Pistons had just six turnovers. … Andre Drummond had 15 points and 11 rebounds.

Rockets: Harden made seven 3-pointers for his 35th game this season with at least four 3-pointers. … Beverley had six points and a career-high 13 rebounds.

THEY SAID IT

Marjanovic on his career-best performance: “I’m more happy because we won this against a very, very good team. We just played hard like you’re supposed to do.”

ANDERSON’S RETURN

Ryan Anderson returned after missing the last six games with a sprained right ankle. He had nine points, three rebounds and a block. D’Antoni said before the game that he’d limit him to 20 minutes in his first game back, but played him for just 13 minutes, where were all in the first half.

 

More AP NBA: apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball

In crowd of young modern centers, don’t forget about Pacers’ Myles Turner

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Myles Turner heard the coaches — on AAU teams, at camps, wherever he showed up.

He just just ignored them.

Despite frequently towering over opponents growing up, Turner often drifted to the perimeter. In positional workouts, he joined the guard groups.

Coaches kept telling him to get in the post.

Where did he gain the confidence to overrule them?

“My shots were going in,” Turner said, “so that’s all the confidence I needed.”

Turner, now the Pacers’ starting center, has reached the other side. Drafted No. 11 in 2014, the skilled 6-foot-11 big man entered an NBA suddenly eager to embrace his style.

No. 1 pick Karl-Anthony Towns (Timberwolves) and No. 4 pick Kristaps Porzingis (Knicks) dominate the headlines from their rookie class, and the middle ground for Joel Embiid (drafted No. 3 by the 76ers one year earlier but debuting this season) puts him in a similar spot on the growth curve. But Turner also warrants attention. He’s averaging 15.5 points, 7.2 rebounds and 2.3 blocks per game on a team rapidly improving its playoff position rather than heading back to the lottery.

If it weren’t for the red-hot Wizards (31-21) — Indiana’s opponent tonight in a nationally televised game — the Pacers’ surge would draw more attention. Indiana (29-23) just won seven in a row before falling to the Cavaliers on Wednesday.

In fact, Turner leads the Pacers in Real Plus-Minus-based wins (5.72, 27th in the NBA). That’s not to say Turner has become Indiana’s best player. Paul George doesn’t lag far behind in that stat (5.32, 33rd in NBA), and his track record of excellence more than makes up for the difference. There’s good reason George is headed to his fourth All-Star game and Turner will be relegated to the Rising Stars Challenge in New Orleans. The only other Pacer in the last decade to participate in that even was George in 2012, exposing how badly this team needed Turner to emerge.

“We’re just scratching the surface with what he’ll be able to do in this league,” Pacers coach Nate McMillan said of Turner.

In George and Turner, Indiana has two building blocks. Remember, a report about the Pacers rejecting George trade inquiries also said Turner was the only other player they weren’t open to dealing.

Jeff Teague has been exceptional since a slow start, and Thaddeus Young is solid. But both are 28, two years older than George. Teague is also headed toward unrestricted free agency this summer. Teague and Young could remain in Indiana long-term, but neither are essential pieces.

George and Turner are, and they offer endless possibilities for roster construction around them. George is an elite two-way player who can score inside and out and guard four positions. Turner is the prototypical modern center.

It’s hard now to effectively use centers who neither stretch the floor nor protect the rim. The real ideal is getting someone who can do both — and that’s Turner.

Just three centers have ever averaged 1.5 3-point attempts and 1.5 blocks per game over a full season: Anthony Davis (last year), Rasheed Wallace (four times, though he also did it as a power forward) and Raef LaFrentz (thrice). This year, six centers are on pace to do it:

  • Joel Embiid (3.2 3-point attempts, 2.5 blocks per game)
  • Brook Lopez (5.1, 1.7)
  • Al Horford (4.5, 1.7)
  • Karl-Anthony Towns (3.4, 1.5)
  • Anthony Davis (1.6, 2.5)
  • Myles Turner (1.7, 2.3)

Kristaps Porzingis and Serge Ibaka have also met the statistical thresholds in previous seasons and are again on pace to reach them this year, but both are primarily power forwards. In the new NBA, though, they could become centers in the coming years.

Of the bunch — including Porzingis — the 20-year-old Turner is the youngest. His potential is just so high.

He’s already much more comfortable beyond the arc than as a rookie, when he popped 2-point jumpers freely but hesitated to venture further out. He’s making 37.9% of his 3-pointers this year, topping any other 1.5/1.5 center.

The next step for Turner is defending the rim better when he doesn’t block shots. Though his rejections are helpful, he still allows opponents to convert at a middling clip when he’s protecting the paint. His defensive positioning should improve with time.

But don’t lose sight have how much Turner has already progressed in only a year. He would have established himself as a legitimate contender for Most Improved Player if Giannis Antetokounmpo weren’t going to run away with the award.

Turner already has more win shares this season (5.3) than last season (3.1). The only players who’ve surpassed their previous career high in win shares by more this season — Lucas NogueiraSam Dekker and Montrezl Harrell — barely played in previous years. Turner started half his games as a rookie. He’s taking a bigger role this season and playing even better within it — the holy-grail combination of improvement.

If not Most Improved Player this season, Turner is on track to receive plenty of accolades in the year ahead. Without altering his approach, Turner has come so far simply because the mindset about big men has changed around him. But he says a greater appreciation for his style doesn’t mean much to him.

“I never really cared what people thought,” Turner said. “I mean, I kind of just played my own game.”