Marcus Smart

NBA Trade Deadline Winners, Losers: It’s a good day to be LeBron

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The NBA Trade Deadline did not disappoint.

The stunners started when the Clippers traded Blake Griffin and continued through the Cavaliers blowing up their roster, and Memphis holding on to the one guy that everyone thought would be traded.

Trying to figure out who won and lost trades on the day they happen tends to be a fool’s errand — we often don’t see the wisdom, or we miss the flaws at first. That’s not going to stop us. Here are our Winners and losers from the wild 2018 NBA Trade Deadline.

Winner: LeBron James.
For the first two-and-a-half months of the NBA season, LeBron James played like an MVP and carried the Cavaliers as far as he could. And it wasn’t far enough. It was clear that the Cavaliers were not on the level of the Warriors or Rockets, and they may not be on the level of the Celtics or Raptors. LeBron became dispirited, his effort waned, particularly on defense, and there wasn’t enough on the team to lift the Cavs up without them — Isaiah Thomas returned and was a shell of his former self, Jae Crowder was a disappointment, and Cleveland just looked look old and slow, particularly on defense. They were not contenders and didn’t look like a team that could make the Eastern Conference Finals.

LeBron should be energized now — the Cavaliers will be younger, more athletic, better defenders and better shooters. How much better is an open question, but better. They also should play faster and be more entertaining. That should fire LeBron up — he’s got a chance again. This team could get him back to the NBA Finals. It could help him stay a Cavalier this summer. Maybe it can’t, it’s far too early to know, but we know for sure the previous iteration of the Cavs couldn’t. A chance is all LeBron can ask.

Losers: Boston Celtics/Toronto Raptors. While the Cavaliers found reinforcements and got better, the two top teams in the East stood pat. The gap closed, and that has them as losers.

Both teams tried to make moves. Boston was active making calls — they tried to move Marcus Smart in a trade, they made calls about Tyreke Evans and were close. However, in the end, the only move the Celtics made was to bring in Greg Monroe to add a little scoring punch off the bench and that is it. The Raptors picked up Malachi Richardson in a trade, but the former Syracuse shooter is a project who doesn’t help them now. Toronto contacted the Clippers about DeAndre Jordan, but there was no deal to be had.

The Eastern Conference Finals could still be Boston vs. Toronto, we don’t know how good these Cavaliers are going to be. But the gap narrowed, Cleveland still has LeBron, he can still dominate, he has some help now, and that should worry Boston and Toronto.

Winner: Koby Altman, Cavaliers GM. Within the 48 hours before the trade deadline, Altman was called a puppet of owner Dan Gilbert and a guy thrown in the deep end who couldn’t really swim. There were questions if he was up for the job.

Any more questions?

Altman pulled off what nobody saw coming — in two trades he revamped the problem areas of the roster on and off the court. Cleveland is now more athletic, should defend better, and has more shooting. Altman did all without giving up the Brooklyn Nets pick. Yes, the Cavaliers took on a lot of future money and had to give up their own first-round pick, but this was a bold stroke from the GM to give his team a chance this season. And a chance to retain LeBron James.

Loser: Isaiah Thomas. Think about where Thomas was one year ago. Around the All-Star Game in 2017 we were talking about how IT was carrying the Celtics to a surprisingly good season, he was one of the league’s leading scorers, and he was on the fringes of the MVP conversation. He ended up an All-NBA player.

What a fall it has been. He was traded to Cleveland in the Kyrie Irving deal — a trade the Cavaliers considered rescinding after they saw just how injured his hip was (not that they would have gone back on it, what the Cavs wanted most was the unprotected Brooklyn 2018 draft pick). Thomas missed the first couple months of this season, and since his return he has not been his vintage self — shooting 36.1 percent (but still gunning away) and being one of the worst defenders in the NBA. Despite all his flaws this season, he was happy to talk publicly about how everything else was wrong with the Cavaliers. So Cleveland sent him to the Lakers in a three-way trade, and now Thomas will soon be back to a sixth-man role behind Lonzo Ball (once Ball gets healthy), then IT heads into free agency with a lot of question marks. His stock is falling fast, and the Cavaliers pulled the ripcord.

Thomas was classy on his way out the door,

Winner: Detroit Pistons. For now. Don’t forget about the other big deadline trade, just a week earlier. Detroit has won five straight games since Blake Griffin came over from the Clippers, and it’s not a coincidence. The Pistons are dramatically better when Griffin and Andre Drummond share the court (plus +22.4 points per 100 possessions, albeit in limited minutes so far). Detroit has a top-eight offense and defense since the trade. Griffin himself is averaging 21.5 points and 7.8 rebounds a game, plus he is assisting on 31.3 percent of teammates buckets when on the court. The Pistons look like a playoff team.

The short term — as long as Griffin stays healthy — was never the question. The negatives were long-haul — the Pistons are loaded with salary and all-in with this roster, considering how much Griffin, Drummond, and the injured Reggie Jackson make there’s not a lot of flexibility. The Pistons are what they are, and they have paid a lot of money for a guy with a long injury history in Griffin. A lot of us think the Pistons will come to regret this trade. Just not this season.

Winner: Dwyane Wade. He gets to go home. Wade had come to Cleveland to play with LeBron again, but as everything went wrong in Cleveland his people made it known he would eventually like to get back to Miami to finish his career there. Thursday, as they blew up the roster, the Cavaliers did Wade a solid and moved him where he wanted to go (for only a protected second-round pick). Wade got what his heart desired.

Loser: Memphis Grizzlies. If there was one thing that was supposed to happen on Thursday, it was Tyreke Evans getting traded. Memphis wanted a first-round pick, but nobody was offering one. The thought was they would eventually cave and take a couple of second-round picks, or a player and a second rounder, just because they had to do something. Evans is on a one-year deal and has played himself to a much bigger contract than the minimum one he was on, but the Grizzlies do not have his Bird rights and likely will not have the cap space to bring him back. Hence the idea was they would trade him.

Memphis was stubborn, they would not come off the first-round pick demand. So the Grizzlies get nothing.

Combine that with them not even considering a Marc Gasol trade, and you get the sense Memphis believes they are just a tweak or two away — plus a healthy Mike Conley — from making it all work and them being in the playoffs. I’m not sold, but they are playing it like they are.

Winner: Los Angeles Lakers’ dreams. With the Lakers getting off Jordan Clarkson‘s contract in the Cavaliers deal (and not bringing any long-term salary back, Channing Frye and Isaiah Thomas will not be with the Lakers next season), Los Angels can reach its goal of having enough cap space to bring in two max free agents. They have to waive and stretch Loul Deng, plus make a couple other small moves, but the dream is within reach.

What dream? To lure both LeBron James and Paul George to the Lakers next season.

That’s incredibly unlikely. LeBron wants to win now and even with himself and PG13 the Lakers are not ready to challenge the Warriors. Meanwhile, George has said he’s happy in Oklahoma City. The odds are against the Lakers. But it’s possible. The door is open. And in Los Angeles, that will fuel dreams of this summer (even though it’s more likely they make a big splash in the summer of 2019).

If nothing else, the Lakers picked up another first-round pick, something that was hard to come by on this deadline day. Just ask Memphis.

Grizzlies reportedly (and inexplicably) keep Tyreke Evans through trade deadline

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I considered Grizzlies guard/forward Tyreke Evans the player most likely to be traded by today’s deadline, which just passed.

He is having a good year for a bad team and will be a free agent next summer. It’ll take cap space or the mid-level exception to give him a starting salary more than $3,948,000. The way he has played, he might draw even more than the mid-level exception, which is all capped-out Memphis is likely to have available. The Grizzlies sent him home in anticipation of a trade. Plenty of teams were interested.

But Memphis stood pat.

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

The Grizzlies wanting a first-round pick is reasonable, but if they could get only a second-rounder, they should have taken the best one. They gain nearly nothing by keeping Evans.

He’s not helping them win meaningfully this season. Memphis is far out of the playoff race and would have gained draft position by dealing him.

And the Grizzlies will still need to use their mid-level exception to re-sign him in the likely event he commands a starting salary above $3,948,000. If they traded him, they could have still signed him with the very same mid-level exception. It wouldn’t be shocking if Evans, who played collegiately at Memphis, returned even after being dealt. Now, though, I wouldn’t be surprised if spending more time with a losing team soured him on the Grizzlies.

There’s potential value in setting a hardline for future trade talks: Meet the asking price, or we’ll keep a player – even if it spites ourselves. But I’m not convinced other front offices will be more likely to acquiesce next time.

Evans wasn’t the only heavily discussed player to stay put. Though trades can still get announced after the deadline – only the call with the league must be initiated by 3 p.m. – DeAndre Jordan (Clippers) and Marcus Smart (Celtics) aren’t going anywhere.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

These make more sense.

Jordan and Smart are both helping their teams win meaningfully this season. Boston will have Smart’s restricted and Bird rights next summer. If Jordan opts out, the Clippers will have his Bird rights. Or, if he doesn’t opt out, they’ll have Jordan.

Escaping shadow of LeBron James’ tweet, Shabazz Napier seizing opportunity with Trail Blazers

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DETROIT – When Shabazz Napier led Connecticut to the 2014 national title, LeBron James – then with the Heat and months before free agency – tweeted:

That was atypical thinking. Dante Exum, Marcus Smart and Tyler Ennis were generally rated higher than Napier, and Elfrid Payton also got drafted higher. Napier was commonly seen as a second-round pick.

Miami traded up to get him with the No. 24 pick, anyway. Though Heat president Pat Riley downplayed LeBron’s involvement in the selection, LeBron was clearly pleased.

But LeBron still bolted for the Cavaliers a couple weeks later, leaving Napier in Miami with an organization that wasn’t necessarily sold on him.

“I knew for a fact they picked me because LeBron,” Napier said. “Which is understandable. I would want to keep the best player on the planet, too. So, that sucked for me.”

Napier tried not to let it affect him, but he couldn’t help but notice how LeBron’s tweet loomed over his pro career.

“To everyone else, it was big. Whenever he says something, it’s big. And that’s because of the impact he has,” Napier said. “But, to me as a person, I always try to live in the moment. I don’t look at it as, ‘Oh, this guys said my name.’ He doesn’t make that big of an impact on my life.

“Unless it’s like my mother or something like that, no one else has a big impact on my life to make me feel a certain way.”

Napier said he lacked confidence throughout his rookie year, taking the blame for that and noting he was too immature. But he also clearly believes he deserved more than fringe-rotation minutes.

“I felt like they didn’t really give me an opportunity,” Napier said.

The next offseason, the Heat traded him to the Magic of practically no return.

“When I went to Orlando, I thought there was going to be an opportunity,” Napier said. “But there wasn’t, really.”

Napier’s production regressed, as his role shrunk even further. He didn’t look cut out for the NBA.

After only one year, Orlando sent him to the Trail Blazers – again, for no real return. In Portland, his role remained minor last season and to begin this season.

But Napier appears to be finally coming into his own.

Shooting more efficiently than ever while remaining pesky defensively, Napier ranks sixth among backup point guards in real plus-minus:

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Napier has made solid gains in most facets of his game, but the biggest change has come with interior scoring. At 6-foot-1, he struggled mightily in the paint against bigger NBA players. After shooting 39% his first three years, Napier has made 57% of his shots in the restricted area this season.

His 3-point percentage has also improved – to 40%, up from 35% his first three seasons. The outside-inside game is producing 9.4 points in 21.6 minutes per game, tilting defenses and creating passing lanes.

Napier can sometimes get overpowered defensively, but he makes up for it with a knack for getting steals.

Important for any Trail Blazers role player, Napier also plays well with both C.J. McCollum (+6.7 points per 100 possessions) and Damian Lillard (+10.9 points per 100 possessions).

But Napier might not be long for Portland.

The Trail Blazers already have $110,456,026 committed to just eight players next season, and that doesn’t even account for pending restricted free agent Jusuf Nurkic. The luxury-tax concerns don’t dissipate in 2019-20, when Portland has $110,128,053 committed to seven players (including rookie-scale options for Zach Collins and Caleb Swanigan, but not a probably re-signed Nurkic).

Considering their ability to stagger Lillard and McCollum as lead guards, the Trail Blazers might deem Napier a luxury they can’t afford. Heck, they might not even extend his $3,452,308 qualifying offer to make him a restricted free agent.

The way Napier is playing, he might fetch more in free agency. Plenty of teams could use him as a backup point guard, and someone could devote a nice chunk of its mid-level exception to signing Napier.

If he’s bound to leave Portland this summer, could the Trail Blazers preemptively trade him for return before Thursday’s deadline? They should consider it. Shedding him and a minimum-salary player (Pat Connaughton or Jake Layman) would allow Portland to dodge the tax this season.

But tied for sixth in the West at 29-25, the Trail Blazers are also trying to win this season. Having Napier helps. It’s unclear how a cost-cutting move would sit with Lillard.

No matter where he ends the season, free agency will be a big opportunity for Napier. After four years at UConn, he’s already 26. This could be his only shot at a major payday.

Portland coach Terry Stotts credited Napier with working extremely hard last summer in advance of a contract year. That’s why Stotts believes Napier has improved so much, though he recognizes another explanation.

“Probably, if you ask him, he’s given an opportunity,” Stotts said.

In that regard, Napier has finally found a team on the same page as him.

“Everyone talks about I’m playing better,” Napier said. “I think it’s just all about opportunity.”

Report: Celtics still targeting Lou Williams, Tyreke Evans in trades

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Danny Ainge isn’t done.

He used $5 million from the Gordon Hayward disabled player exception to go get Greg Monroe as a backup center, to provide a little more scoring punch off the bench when needed.

This isn’t a breaking revelation, but a reminder Ainge continues to look to add a little more scoring depth, either in the form of Lou Williams from the Clippers or Tyreke Evans from the Grizzlies, as reported by Steve Bulpett of the Boston Herald.

According to two Western Conference sources, the Celts are still in pursuit of Lou Williams and Tyreke Evans. They have had discussions regarding others, but those two appear to be the main targets as the C’s look to add scoring off the bench.

The key in each of these cases is how much will be required to make a deal. The Celts are said to be willing to part with assets, but Ainge seems to be again holding the line on what he believes is proper value. The strategy has frustrated other clubs and a percentage of the fan base, but it doesn’t appear to be changing.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN said on his latest podcast that the Celtics are willing to move Marcus Smart as part of a package.

While all trade rumors should be taken with a grain of salt, that is especially true with Boston. Ainge and staff are the masters of misdirection and moving teams through rumors — they are the cold-war era Russians of misinformation in the NBA.

That said, Boston believes it can challenge and beat Cleveland this season — Hayward or not — and it would make sense to add depth for that run.

Both the Clippers and Grizzlies have been asking for a first rounder for their players. The Celtics have those picks but Ainge has been hesitant to use them. Both Williams and Evans are in the last year of their contracts and will be free agents this summer, however, if a team trades for Williams they get his Bird Rights for the next contract (Evans, on a one-year deal, does not have those).

The sense around the league is the Clippers will get a first for Williams, who is a proven sixth man (he is the current leader in the Sixth Man of the Year race again) and because teams can use his Bird rights to re-sign him. With Evans, other teams have yet to offer a first, and this is likely to drag out until the deadline (would Memphis eventually take the Emanuel Mudiay and a second offer from Denver?).

Whatever happens, always keep

 

Power Rankings: Just how far will the Cavaliers fall?

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The Blake Griffin trade, plus injuries to Kevin Love and DeMarcus Cousins, have shaken up the NBA, but their impact is just starting to be felt in the power rankings. Golden State and Houston are cruising on top, while the Cavaliers have fallen to 14th and that that may not be rock bottom

 
Warriors small icon 1. Warriors (40-11 Last Week No. 1). Teams playing the Warriors work hard to chase all those shooters off the three-point line, as they should. The problem is both Klay Thompson (43.1%) and Stephen Curry (41.2%) are shooting very well on threes off the dribble — they still make defenders pay for crowding them out at the arc with a little bit of movement. Well, not the Utah Jazz on Tuesday, when the Warriors had their worst loss of the season. I pity the Kings, who are up next on the schedule after the Warriors rest up and Kerr yells at them.

 
Rockets small icon 2. Rockets (36-13, LW 2). Houston is defending well again (or at least back to their season average) and are 12th in the NBA on that end of the floor in their last 1o games. Not coincidentally, Luc Mbah a Moute came back in that stretch, they are much better defenders with him on the floor. More big tests this week for the Rockets with the Spurs (Thursday) and the Cavaliers (Saturday), the week after the Rockets finally lost a game where James Harden, Chris Paul, and Clint Capela all played.

 
Raptors small icon 3. Raptors (34-15, LW 4). Kyle Lowry didn’t make the All-Star game for his first eight seasons in the league, but is now back for his second straight. The only other NBA player ever not to be named an All-Star the first eight seasons then make it? Chauncey Billups. That’s good company. The Raptors have started 2-1 in a home-heavy stretch of the schedule (7-of-10 in the Air Canada Centre).

 
Celtics small icon 4. Celtics (36-15, LW 5). Boston is active on the trade market, looking to add a little more depth and scoring at the deadline. Their bench has had some rough games, and now they second-unit leader Marcus Smart is going to miss time because he hates the pictures on the walls in hotels. I’ve been told they have interest in Tyreke Evans, but they are looking at more than just him. This isn’t a major move, just a team looking for more depth to get through the second half of the season.

 
Thunder small icon 5. Thunder (30-21 LW 7).. They had won eight in a row until Tuesday, but things are going to get difficult for the Thunder now. Andre Roberson being out for the season is a big blow — the team’s defense is 11.9 points per 100 possessions better when he is on the court. He and Paul George made a strong pair of switchable defensive wings that could help get stops — the kind of wings you need against the Warriors in the playoffs.

 
Spurs small icon 6. Spurs (34-19, LW 6). San Antonio has won 4-of-5, and while it’s fair to say they’ve done it scoring points against struggling defenses (such as Cleveland) the wins still count the same. And they are doing it without Kawhi Leonard (plus LaMarcus Aldridge and Pau Gasol have missed time). Light week on the schedule before the Spurs head out on their annual “rodeo road trip.”

 
7. Timberwolves (32-22, LW 3). You could see what Jimmy Butler means to this team on defense when he was out for four games. For the season the Timberwolves are a whopping 11 points per 100 possessions worse when Butler is off the court. Minnesota has lost 4-of-5 and are home to some challenging tests this week with the Bucks and Pelicans.

 
Heat small icon 8. Heat (29-21, LW 9). They’re the best team without an All-Star, and it seems a little unfair that a team knocking on the door of passing the stumbling Cavaliers in the standings doesn’t have an All-Star. Dallas coach Rick Carlisle is right, Eric Spoelstra is the Miami All-Star — he’s had wildly shifting lineups all season, a record in close games that seems unsustainable (they are a league-best 22-11 in games within five points in the final five minutes of a game), yet they keep on getting it done.

Bucks small icon 9. Bucks (27-22 LW 11). Milwaukee is 4-0 under interim coach Joe Prunty, although he walked into a soft part of the schedule. That starts to change with 5-of-6 coming up on the road, including stops in Minnesota and Miami. Jabari Parker makes his return to the lineup Friday night against the Knicks, and hopefully soon we can see what a fully healthy and functional Bucks team will look like.

 
Pelicans small icon 10. Pelicans (27-23, LW 9). What a punch to the gut. DeMarcus Cousins is out for the season with a ruptured Achilles (not coincidentally after a stretch of very heavy use by Alvin Gentry), and that leaves the Pelicans and Anthony Davis trying to hang on to a playoff slot. Which is not going to be easy, as a home loss to Sacramento Tuesday night showed. New Orleans should still be good when Anthony Davis is on the court (especially with Jrue Holiday playing well), but the question is how bad does it get when he rests? The Pelicans wanted to rent Nicola Mitotic but he wants to get paid his $12.5 million next year if traded, so the sides could not reach a deal.

 
Pacers small icon 11. Pacers (28-23, LW 12). Call it the former Thunder connection: Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis have a great pick-and-roll chemistry. When the Pacers were losing to the Magic on Saturday, Indiana started to lean heavily on that combination and it helped spark a comeback win. Indiana has started off 2-0 on a stretch of 5-of-6 at home, a chance for them to cement a little playoff security with wins.

 
Wizards small icon 12. Wizards (28-22, LW 10). The Wizards have been 6.2 points per 100 possessions better with Wall on the court, and they have been outscored by 1.8 per 100 with him sitting. Now Wall is out for a knee operation for 6-8 weeks (another clean-up), and combine that with the fact 16 of Washington’s next 20 games are against teams currently in the playoffs and there is a serious potential for a slide down the standings (and these rankings). Expect to see a lot more Thomas Satoransky and Tim Frazier, but they are no John Wall.

 
Blazers small icon 13. Trail Blazers (28-22, LW 15). Terry Stotts sounded a little frustrated before his team beat the Clippers Tuesday — early in the season the defense was good but the offense stumbled, now the offense has found a groove again (111.4 points per 100 possessions in the last 10 games, fourth in the NBA) but the defense has slid back to bottom 10. As the Blazers fight for playoff position, they need both on the same night to lock down their spot.

 
Cavaliers small icon 14. Cavaliers (29-20 LW 13). Just when it looked like they might turn things around, Kevin Love breaks his left hand and that will need surgery to repair. He’s out 6-8 weeks, and that messes up not only the rotations and leaves the Cavaliers scrambling for more scoring, but it makes it harder for the Cavs to trade Channing Frye or Tristan Thompson (unless another big man comes back in the deal). Big game against Miami Wednesday for third place in the East.

 
Sixers small icon 15. 76ers (24-23, LW 14). In a sign of how far the Sixers have come this season, they swept the season series from the San Antonio Spurs — for the past six years it was the Spurs who did the sweeping. Ben Simmons and some Sixers fans have been campaigning for the rookie to be put on the All-Star team as a reserve (he hadn’t been as of this writing), but he’s faded some after a fast start and that likely hurt him on the coaches’ ballots (which is what Adam Silver generally goes on when he picks).

 
Nuggets small icon 16. Nuggets (26-25, LW 18). With the Pelicans and Clippers both losing key parts to their team this week, the Nuggets should be able to hold on to a playoff slot in the West — but things are not that simple. They have dropped two in a row to Boston and San Antonio, and the rough stretch of the schedule continues with the Thunder and Warriors this week, the Rockets and Spurs next week. Denver needs to find some wins in there and lock down its spot.

 
Clippers small icon 17. Clippers (25-25 LW 16). The Blake Griffin trade left the Los Angeles locker room stunned, and with the sense that the trading is not done — don’t be shocked if the Clippers move one or both of DeAndre Jordan and Lou Williams before the Feb. 8 deadline. While this is the right basketball move in a cold world, Griffin forever changed the Clippers franchise from the inside by his talent and work ethic — he made a joke of a team be more professional to keep up with him (back in the Donald Sterling years). They should still retire his number someday.

 
Knicks small icon 18. Knicks (23-28, LW 20). Kristaps Porzingis shot an impressive 47.4% from three in January, but he shot just 39.5% in the paint for the month and only 46.7% at the rim. He and the Knicks need more consistency. The Knicks also need better defense — which was nearly non-existent on a recent 7-game road trip (where the Knicks went 3-4). While the Knicks may dream of the playoffs, they likely need to go about 22-9 the rest of the way to get to where the Sixers and Pacers will be.

Pistons small icon 19. Pistons (23-26, LW 17). Stan Van Gundy has swung for the fences — or at least for the playoffs — with his move to trade for Blake Griffin. When healthy Griffin is an All-Star level player — to pair with Andre Drummond who is now an All-Star in the East — but his massive contract will make it hard to put enough pieces around the two bigs to make this a truly dangerous team. But, the move should help sell tickets in the new downtown arena.

 
Jazz small icon 20. Jazz (22-28, LW 25). Joe Ingles leads the NBA in three-point shooting percentage off the dribble hitting 48.3% — that’s an incredibly valuable skill as teams chase shooters off the arc more. Utah’s playoff dreams are not dead (not with what has happened to the Clippers and Pelicans), but they will still need to go at least 21-9 or better the rest of the way to make the cut. That’s a tall order.

 
Hornets small icon 21. Hornets (20-29, LW 19). It doesn’t look like the Hornets will be sellers at this trade deadline, but the questions about whether to hang on or move Kemba Walker and some bad contracts to start a rebuild will continue into the summer. Charlotte seems to have found a little more of an offensive groove again with Steve Clifford back on the sidelines — they’re taking and making more threes — which is going to get them wins.

 
Grizzlies small icon 22. Grizzlies (18-31, LW 21). Mike Conley will have surgery on his heel he has tried to avoid and is now done for the entire season, which is the smart thing (get him right for next season). Tyreke Evans will almost certainly be moved at the trade deadline, Memphis is simply holding out for the best deal (they are demanding a first-round pick, which teams have yet to cough up). Rookie Ivan Rabb is getting more run late, and with the Grizzlies out of the playoff picture that should continue as they try to develop him.

 
Lakers small icon 23. Lakers (19-30 LW 22). No timeline yet on exactly when Lonzo Ball will return to the lineup (or if he can play in the Rising Stars game All-Star weekend, although the Lakers would like him to since it’s at Staples Center.) Still the Lakers are showing development and some grit, getting wins over Indiana and Boston before heading out for 8-of-10 on the road (they have started that stretch 1-1).

 
Bulls small icon 24. Bulls (18-32 LW 23).. The bubble has burst on the Bulls hot streak, having now lost 4-of-5 and about to head out on the road for three more games. Rookie Lauri Markkanen has been part of that, shooting just 21.6% from three over his last five games. The Bulls are still working to move Nikola Mitotic before the deadline, but he’s not going to approve a trade where the new team doesn’t pick up his $12.5 million option for next season (he can do that because he will lose his Bird rights) and it’s unlikely a team will do that. New Orleans wouldn’t.

 
Mavericks small icon 25. Mavericks (16-35 LW 24). Another week, another milestone: Dirk Nowitzki is on the verge of being only the sixth player in NBA history to play 50,000 regular season minutes, which is an impressive feat. We will remember the future Hall of Famer for his one-legged fadeaway and being the best shooting big man, and best European, ever in the NBA, but he has been tough, and durable, as well.

 
Kings small icon 26. Kings (16-34, LW 29). Sacramento went a respectable 3-3 on a six-game road trip through the South, and they showed again that if they can get a lead they can hold it — the Kings are 10-2 when leading after three quarters this season. Good news that coach Dave Joerger has been given a clean bill of healthy to return to the sidelines after his dizzy spell on the court recently. He probably will be on the bench again Friday, or at least this weekend.

 
Nets small icon 27. Nets (18-33, LW 26). D’Angelo Russell has been back for five games now but he’s still looking rusty and off, shooting just 28.6% overall and 22.2% from three. He’s also been turning the ball over about twice as often as he’s made an assist. Some rust is expected, but he’s not playing in a way that will make Brooklyn want to give him an extension this summer. Expect them to pick up his option, play his fourth season, and then become a restricted free agent.

 
Hawks small icon 28. Hawks (15-35, LW 27). When I watched a young Dennis Schroder fresh out of Germany at his first Summer League, I thought “he’s going to be a great defender, I just hope his offense comes along. His offenses did, but he’s not put in the effort on defense — the Hawks are 9.2 points per 100 possessions better defensively with him off the court this season. That has to be driving Mike Budenholzer crazy.

 
Suns small icon 29. Suns (17-34, LW 28). The Suns have moved Devin Booker over to the starting point guard role now — he has the ball in his hands. Booker has put up points (31 against the Rockets) but he’s not consistent at getting teammates involved, and he needs a much better defensive guard next to him or the plan will be exploited. With where the Suns are this season, this is exactly what they should be experimenting with.

 
Magic small icon 30. Magic (14-35, LW 30). Orlando is willing to be a seller at the trade deadline, but will there be any buyers for Evan Fournier or Elfrid Payton. A lot of teams — maybe 29 other ones — could use the shooting Fournier brings, but his salary is going to make a few teams back off. Orlando is certainly a team to watch as we move toward the Feb. 8 deadline.