Malachi Richardson

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Report: Kings angered Cavaliers and Jazz by trying to include Georgios Papagiannis in trade at last minute

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The Cavaliers were busy leading up to the trade deadline.

The completed three trades with four teams, sent out six players and acquired four. They also seriously discussed a deal with the Clippers for DeAndre Jordan.

One of the trades Cleveland general manager Koby Altman actually made – a three-teamer with the Jazz and Kings that netted Rodney Hood and George Hill and sent Jae Crowder and Derrick Rose to Utah and Iman Shumpert to Sacramento – could have fallen apart. Unsurprisingly, the Kings are getting blamed.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Altman had negotiated the trade with Kings assistant general manager Brandon Williams, who works under GM Vlade Divac. The management structure in Sacramento can make deals dicey, because Divac seldom gets on the phone for the trade-building parts — and yet he ultimately has decision-making power with owner Vivek Ranadive.

That’s why a 3 a.m. ET deal memo sent from Sacramento to Cleveland left Altman at first incredulous — and then angry. Suddenly, Kings center Georgios Papagiannis had been included as part of the three-way trade. Cleveland and Utah were adamant that Papagiannis’ name had never been discussed. Williams would later say that Papagiannis or Malachi Richardson were set to be included in the deals and insisted his notes confirmed that.

Because Sacramento had the makings for a trade with Toronto for Richardson, rival executives say that the Kings pushed to spare themselves the embarrassment of waiving the No. 13 overall pick in the 2016 NBA draft — and let someone else do it. In the middle of the night, Altman and Williams vocally disagreed over the insertion of Papagiannis into the trade. Cleveland couldn’t take him into its roster because the NBA’s repeater tax would turn the balance of his $2.3 million contract this year and $2.4 million next year into three times that with the luxury-tax bill.

In the morning, Altman let the Jazz know about Sacramento’s inclusion of Papagiannis. Jazz GM Dennis Lindsey was livid. To him, this was a deal-breaker. He hadn’t dealt directly with Sacramento, because there had been no need: The deal went through Cleveland, and Altman had never suggested to Lindsey that Utah would have to take a 7-foot draft bust onto his roster.

The Cavs didn’t want Papagiannis, who would have cost them far more in luxury tax, either. And the Kings had to shed one more player, because they needed to clear a roster spot to complete the trade.

But the teams still found a workable solution.

The Cavaliers ($2.1 million) and Jazz ($1.1 million) both sent Sacramento cash. That was was the most the Cavs, who’ve already included cash in other deals, were allowed to convey. So, to get Utah to cover the rest, Cleveland granted the Jazz the right to swap 2024 second-rounders.

That mostly covered the Kings’ cost of waiving Papagiannis, who was guaranteed$3,206,606 the rest of this season plus next. [Correction: This post previously didn’t include Papagiannis’ 2018-19 salary.]

Sacramento management has struggled to communicate with players, agents and executives. The Kings might spin this story a different way, but everyone will believe they’re at fault. They’ve long lost lost benefit of the doubt, and this will only further erode trust.

But maybe they leveraged the confusion into a little extra money. That’s almost certainly not worth it in a relationship business, but it’s better than nothing.

NBA Trade Deadline Winners, Losers: It’s a good day to be LeBron

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The NBA Trade Deadline did not disappoint.

The stunners started when the Clippers traded Blake Griffin and continued through the Cavaliers blowing up their roster, and Memphis holding on to the one guy that everyone thought would be traded.

Trying to figure out who won and lost trades on the day they happen tends to be a fool’s errand — we often don’t see the wisdom, or we miss the flaws at first. That’s not going to stop us. Here are our Winners and losers from the wild 2018 NBA Trade Deadline.

Winner: LeBron James.
For the first two-and-a-half months of the NBA season, LeBron James played like an MVP and carried the Cavaliers as far as he could. And it wasn’t far enough. It was clear that the Cavaliers were not on the level of the Warriors or Rockets, and they may not be on the level of the Celtics or Raptors. LeBron became dispirited, his effort waned, particularly on defense, and there wasn’t enough on the team to lift the Cavs up without them — Isaiah Thomas returned and was a shell of his former self, Jae Crowder was a disappointment, and Cleveland just looked look old and slow, particularly on defense. They were not contenders and didn’t look like a team that could make the Eastern Conference Finals.

LeBron should be energized now — the Cavaliers will be younger, more athletic, better defenders and better shooters. How much better is an open question, but better. They also should play faster and be more entertaining. That should fire LeBron up — he’s got a chance again. This team could get him back to the NBA Finals. It could help him stay a Cavalier this summer. Maybe it can’t, it’s far too early to know, but we know for sure the previous iteration of the Cavs couldn’t. A chance is all LeBron can ask.

Losers: Boston Celtics/Toronto Raptors. While the Cavaliers found reinforcements and got better, the two top teams in the East stood pat. The gap closed, and that has them as losers.

Both teams tried to make moves. Boston was active making calls — they tried to move Marcus Smart in a trade, they made calls about Tyreke Evans and were close. However, in the end, the only move the Celtics made was to bring in Greg Monroe to add a little scoring punch off the bench and that is it. The Raptors picked up Malachi Richardson in a trade, but the former Syracuse shooter is a project who doesn’t help them now. Toronto contacted the Clippers about DeAndre Jordan, but there was no deal to be had.

The Eastern Conference Finals could still be Boston vs. Toronto, we don’t know how good these Cavaliers are going to be. But the gap narrowed, Cleveland still has LeBron, he can still dominate, he has some help now, and that should worry Boston and Toronto.

Winner: Koby Altman, Cavaliers GM. Within the 48 hours before the trade deadline, Altman was called a puppet of owner Dan Gilbert and a guy thrown in the deep end who couldn’t really swim. There were questions if he was up for the job.

Any more questions?

Altman pulled off what nobody saw coming — in two trades he revamped the problem areas of the roster on and off the court. Cleveland is now more athletic, should defend better, and has more shooting. Altman did all without giving up the Brooklyn Nets pick. Yes, the Cavaliers took on a lot of future money and had to give up their own first-round pick, but this was a bold stroke from the GM to give his team a chance this season. And a chance to retain LeBron James.

Loser: Isaiah Thomas. Think about where Thomas was one year ago. Around the All-Star Game in 2017 we were talking about how IT was carrying the Celtics to a surprisingly good season, he was one of the league’s leading scorers, and he was on the fringes of the MVP conversation. He ended up an All-NBA player.

What a fall it has been. He was traded to Cleveland in the Kyrie Irving deal — a trade the Cavaliers considered rescinding after they saw just how injured his hip was (not that they would have gone back on it, what the Cavs wanted most was the unprotected Brooklyn 2018 draft pick). Thomas missed the first couple months of this season, and since his return he has not been his vintage self — shooting 36.1 percent (but still gunning away) and being one of the worst defenders in the NBA. Despite all his flaws this season, he was happy to talk publicly about how everything else was wrong with the Cavaliers. So Cleveland sent him to the Lakers in a three-way trade, and now Thomas will soon be back to a sixth-man role behind Lonzo Ball (once Ball gets healthy), then IT heads into free agency with a lot of question marks. His stock is falling fast, and the Cavaliers pulled the ripcord.

Thomas was classy on his way out the door,

Winner: Detroit Pistons. For now. Don’t forget about the other big deadline trade, just a week earlier. Detroit has won five straight games since Blake Griffin came over from the Clippers, and it’s not a coincidence. The Pistons are dramatically better when Griffin and Andre Drummond share the court (plus +22.4 points per 100 possessions, albeit in limited minutes so far). Detroit has a top-eight offense and defense since the trade. Griffin himself is averaging 21.5 points and 7.8 rebounds a game, plus he is assisting on 31.3 percent of teammates buckets when on the court. The Pistons look like a playoff team.

The short term — as long as Griffin stays healthy — was never the question. The negatives were long-haul — the Pistons are loaded with salary and all-in with this roster, considering how much Griffin, Drummond, and the injured Reggie Jackson make there’s not a lot of flexibility. The Pistons are what they are, and they have paid a lot of money for a guy with a long injury history in Griffin. A lot of us think the Pistons will come to regret this trade. Just not this season.

Winner: Dwyane Wade. He gets to go home. Wade had come to Cleveland to play with LeBron again, but as everything went wrong in Cleveland his people made it known he would eventually like to get back to Miami to finish his career there. Thursday, as they blew up the roster, the Cavaliers did Wade a solid and moved him where he wanted to go (for only a protected second-round pick). Wade got what his heart desired.

Loser: Memphis Grizzlies. If there was one thing that was supposed to happen on Thursday, it was Tyreke Evans getting traded. Memphis wanted a first-round pick, but nobody was offering one. The thought was they would eventually cave and take a couple of second-round picks, or a player and a second rounder, just because they had to do something. Evans is on a one-year deal and has played himself to a much bigger contract than the minimum one he was on, but the Grizzlies do not have his Bird rights and likely will not have the cap space to bring him back. Hence the idea was they would trade him.

Memphis was stubborn, they would not come off the first-round pick demand. So the Grizzlies get nothing.

Combine that with them not even considering a Marc Gasol trade, and you get the sense Memphis believes they are just a tweak or two away — plus a healthy Mike Conley — from making it all work and them being in the playoffs. I’m not sold, but they are playing it like they are.

Winner: Los Angeles Lakers’ dreams. With the Lakers getting off Jordan Clarkson‘s contract in the Cavaliers deal (and not bringing any long-term salary back, Channing Frye and Isaiah Thomas will not be with the Lakers next season), Los Angels can reach its goal of having enough cap space to bring in two max free agents. They have to waive and stretch Loul Deng, plus make a couple other small moves, but the dream is within reach.

What dream? To lure both LeBron James and Paul George to the Lakers next season.

That’s incredibly unlikely. LeBron wants to win now and even with himself and PG13 the Lakers are not ready to challenge the Warriors. Meanwhile, George has said he’s happy in Oklahoma City. The odds are against the Lakers. But it’s possible. The door is open. And in Los Angeles, that will fuel dreams of this summer (even though it’s more likely they make a big splash in the summer of 2019).

If nothing else, the Lakers picked up another first-round pick, something that was hard to come by on this deadline day. Just ask Memphis.

Report: Bruno Caboclo traded to Sacramento for Malachi Richardson

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On a day of blockbuster trades, this one is more of a “you take my project, I’ll take yours” kind of deal, one that is more about clearing roster room in Sacramento.

Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports broke the news that Toronto has Bruno Caboclo traded to Sacramento for Malachi Richardson.

The Kings will waive Caboclo, this clears up a roster spot for their involvement in all the other trades involving Cleveland. It is possible a protected second rounder or something may be coming their way as well in the final call on this deal, but it wouldn’t be significant.

The Raptors win this trade. In Richardson, they land a guy who a number of teams wondered could be developed into a good shooter and rotation player outside of Sacramento. Richardson is supposed to be a shooter, but he’s hitting just 30 percent from three this season, is scoring just 0.67 points per possession on spot-up attempts (nearly half his shots), and has had a very limited role on a bad team. He’s got potential, but he’s been up and down in the G-League for two seasons for a reason. Still, a good gamble by the Raptors.

Report: ‘Significant hurdles’ remain before Cavaliers-Kings George Hill trade

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The Cavaliers trading Iman Shumpert, Channing Frye and a second-round pick to the Kings for George Hill seemed inevitable.

But…

Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com:

The Cavaliers and Kings are further apart on a trade for George Hill than it first appeared, sources told cleveland.com, with significant hurdles toward a potential deal remaining.

One source told cleveland.com that the two sides were speaking “conceptually” about Hill and were never close; another said the Cavs sought to change the parameters of a potential trade.

Sacramento would need to clear a roster spot to make the trade as reported. Skal Labissiere and Malachi Richardson were reportedly available, but finding a third team always makes a trade more complex and less likely.

Cleveland could use Hill, who’d provide a better defensive option at point guard with Isaiah Thomas and add depth at shooting guard with the struggling J.R. Smith.

But unhappy and expensive, Hill should be available closer to the trade deadline. Before making such a safe addition, the Cavs probably could keep the door open for a bigger move then trade for Hill later if still desirable. That said, a deal falling apart can not only indicate, but also create, reasons it won’t happen.

Three questions the Sacramento Kings must answer this season

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The NBC/ProBasketballTalk season previews will ask the questions each of the 30 NBA teams must answer this season to make their season a success. We are looking at one team a day until the start of the season, and it begins with a look back at the team’s offseason moves.

Last season: 32-50, missed the playoffs for the 10th straight season.

I know what you did last summer: Their “summer” really started last February at the trade deadline when they moved DeMarcus Cousins for Buddy Hield. The Kings had an active summer, and that included moving on from a lot of guys on the roster: Rudy Gay, Darren Collison, Ty Lawson, Tyreke Evans, Arron Afflalo, and Ben McLemore among others were gone. To replace them they drafted De’Aaron Fox, Justin Jackson, rolled the dice on Harry Giles, the Kings finally got Bogdan Bogdanovic to come over, then in free agency landed some solid veteran free agents in George Hill, Zach Randolph, and Vince Carter.

THREE QUESTIONS THE KINGS MUST ANSWER

1) How do the Kings balance the minutes between their best young players and their veterans? George Hill is clear and away the best point guard option on the Kings, but they just drafted the speedy and talented De’Aaron Fox. Zach Randolph, while his skills are fading, is a solid four coach Dave Joerger can trust, but Skal Labissiere could become the most skilled power forward on this roster. Kosta Koufos is a solid veteran big who will not beat you with mistakes, but the Kings are trying to season the talented Willie Cauley-Stein at center.

It’s the biggest question coach Joerger has heading into the season, how to balance out the minutes and opportunities for the veterans on this team vs. the best young prospects on the Kings’ roster. It’s easy to say “George Hill is there to develop guys like Fox and Buddy Hield” but that doesn’t mean Hill is just another coach riding the pine most of the time. The Kings aren’t going to win a lot of games, but veterans like Vince Carter can show young players how to compete (Carter, who has been in the league since roughly the Taft administration, may well be the best three on this roster still). The hope has to be that as the season goes along, as the young players get minutes and good developmental coaching, their role grows as the veterans take a step back, but will it work out that way?

Tied to this: How long are these veterans going to be Kings? Part of the reason for bringing in a guy like Hill is that at some point a team hurting at the point guard spot due to injuries or whatever reason come calling. These teams will want Hill, and in return the Kings can get a quality young prospect or a good pick. The question is how long before the calls come, and how much demand will there be (especially for the aging Randolph and Carter)? It may happen this season, at or before the trade deadline, or it could be next summer, but expect the Kings to make a move.

2) Which young players on this roster develop into quality NBA players? The Kings have eight guys on rookie contracts plus a couple other young players — they have 10 players 25 and younger. The Kings are in the player development business now, and the question is which ones will find their way to become NBA players of some level — stars, starters, rotation players, whatever?

There are interesting questions up and down the young roster. Harry Giles will be out until at least January (if not the season), but can he get healthy and if so how much can he contribute? Skal Labissiere showed promise at the end of last season, can he build on that (he didn’t at Summer League)? Can Justin Jackson get stronger, develop his shot and become a rotation player at the three? Just how good is Willie Cauley-Stein? Same question for Malachi Richardson? A lot of these questions could get answered on the Reno Bighorns, which is where some of these players will go to get run.

For me, the most interesting battle to watch is at the two. The Kings got Buddy Hield back as the main piece from New Orleans in the DeMarcus Cousins trade, and in 25 games with the Kings he averaged 15.1 points per game and shot 42.8 percent from three. However, the Kings are also very high Bogdan Bogdanovic, who Vlade Divac called the “the best player in Europe” and he is going battle for that starting spot. Which one of these two develops into a starter and takes the job, and who does not. We’ll see how Hield develops, but watching him as a rookie — and his both lack of understanding and interest on defense — and I saw a sixth man. A gunner in the Lou Williams/Jamal Crawford mold — which is not a bad thing, those guys have had good careers and helped a lot of teams. Is Hield on that path, or can he develop into something more?

3) Can management and ownership be patient? The Kings have a good plan in place. They have young players with potential — De’Aaron Fox, Justin Jackson, Skal Labissiere, Willie Cauley-Stein, and more — and some veterans were brought in to mentor them and set a tone. Whatever you think of the young talent (I like the potential) or how many veterans they brought in (more than I would have) it’s a solid rebuilding plan. One that’s not going to yield a lot of wins short term (they retain their first round pick next draft) but is a respectable and reasonable path.

The problem is the Kings have never stuck to a plan long enough to let it play out. Look at it this way, since they drafted Cousins in 2010 the Kings coaches have been Paul Westphal, Keith Smart, Mike Malone, Ty Corbin, George Karl, and Dave Joerger. That’s not counting the three different GMs and a change of ownership. With each successive move the plan shifted, and with that, the roster and the style were never settled.

This falls to owner Vivek Ranadive — he has to be patient. It’s not in his nature, but he needs to be. I don’t know that I would have chosen Vlade Divac to run my team, but now that Ranadive has let the basketball people make the basketball decisions. Divac and the staff there have planted a garden, let it start to grow and blossom, and know that it’s going to take years to bear fruit. The biggest mistake the Kings could make right now would be to at the All-Star break (or next summer) change plans, bring in a new GM and coach, and completely change directions.