Klay Thompson

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Kevin Durant gifted Warriors an absurdly good offseason

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I’m grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

The Warriors’ 2016 offseason sent shockwaves through the league, sparking questions about competitive balance and whether the entire system required reform. Think about that for a moment. The Warriors’ summer of 2016 was so incredible, it became a referendum on the NBA itself.

We didn’t even fully understand how incredible it was until this summer.

Forget the attention and pressure. Ignore industry-specific factors, like who beat whom in the playoffs. The Warriors wooed Kevin Durant with many of the same reasons we choose jobs – pay, work environment, location. Durant picked a max salary from one of the NBA’s most successful teams in the trendy Bay Area. It was a reasonable decision.

Golden State followed that with an unreasonably good 2017 offseason.

The Warriors impressed Durant so much, they didn’t even need to pay the max to keep him.

Everything fell into place from there for Golden State, which secured its place as a budding dynasty. The defending champions enter next season even stronger.

Durant’s discount from his max salary ($34,682,550) to the Non-Bird Exception ($31,848,120) allowed the Warriors to retain Andre Iguodala‘s and Shaun Livingston‘s Bird Rights. Durant’s discount from the Non-Bird Exception to his actual salary ($25 million) effectively serves as a wealth transfer from the millionaire player to the team’s billionaire owners. His $6,848,120 concession, based on the current roster, will save Golden State more than $30 million in salary and luxury tax.

So, now the Warriors are more equipped to win and turn a bigger profit.

Stephen Curry re-signed on a five-year super-max deal, and he didn’t even get a player option. Golden Sate signed the NBA’s two best free agents, and the only drama was over just how team-friendly their contracts would be. At least Curry got every last dollar.

The Warriors also signed Nick Young (taxpayer mid-level exception) and Omri Casspi (minimum) – luxuries for a team already running circles around the rest of the league. Young has become a 3-point specialist who tries defensively, and he’ll provide excessive firepower in limited minutes behind Klay Thompson. A combo forward, Casspi fits well in the small-ball lineups Golden State has popularized.

Zaza Pachulia (Non-Bird Exception), David West (minimum) and JaVale McGee (minimum) re-signed. A formidable big-man rotation for less than most teams spend on a single moderately helpful center. The Warriors are just operating in a different world than everyone else.

Case in point, Jordan Bell. The Warriors paid the Bulls a record $3.5 million for the No. 38 pick to get Bell, a versatile defender who’s perfectly cast as Draymond Green‘s understudy. But because drafted players can count less toward the tax, signing a rookie free agent to a minimum deal instead of acquiring Bell would’ve cost Golden State $2,131,243 more in luxury tax. Deduct that from the $3.5 million and consider Bell’s talent, and it’s a clear win for Golden State.

The Warriors just keep getting all those moves, big and small, right.

The repeater tax and raises for Thompson and Green loom. Guaranteeing the 33-year-old Iguodala $48 million and 31-year-old Livingston $18 million limits flexibility. Teams don’t remain elite forever.

But Golden State is riding its wave – on and off the court – higher than maybe any team ever.

Offseason grade: A

Rumor: Warriors to pursue Paul George

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Remember when Klay Thompson‘s dad/Los Angeles sportscaster Mychal Thompson brought up the Warriors chasing Kevin Durant more than a year before they actually signed him?

It seems Tim Kawakami and Marcus Thompson of The Athletic are doing something similar with Paul George and Golden State.

Kawakami on Posting Up:

Marcus and I have teased this for more than a year. We think they’re going to go after Paul George, somehow. I think Joe Lacob is going to try to find a way to get Paul George. I don’t know how that would happen, but I didn’t know how it was going to happen when they were – three years ago, when they said they were go after Durant. Well, they didn’t say it. But they might have whispered it.

The Warriors could have had George already – if they would’ve traded Klay Thompson to the Pacers. But there’s obviously a huge difference between acquiring George on an expiring contract and signing him outright in free agency next summer.

As far-fetched as Golden State landing Durant seemed, the impending salary-cap spike always made it plausible. The Warriors had to dump Andrew Bogut and let Harrison Barnes walk, but that was small potatoes for getting Durant.

Signing George would almost certainly require very large potatoes.

A little perspective: The salary cap projects to be $102 million next summer, but it won’t be determined until then. Even if they trim their roster to just Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green, the Warriors wouldn’t have enough cap room to pay George his max unless the salary cap eclipses $118 million. The NBA’s salary-cap projections can fluctuate, but a $16 million increase within a year is nowhere near heard of. And that would leave just the room exception – which would be about $5 million in this scenario – for Kevin Durant, who would have presumably opted out. He might be taking an unexpectedly large discount this year, but that’d be a monumentally large sacrifice by Durant next year.

More realistically, Golden State could use Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston to sign-and-trade for George. But that’d require appeasing the Thunder, no easy task. The Warriors would also have to stay below the hard cap – which is barely feasible, unless George and/or Durant take large discounts. Even then, it’d be a tough squeeze.

Golden State could also try to trade for George before the trade deadline, acquiring his Bird Rights then spending any amount to re-sign him and Durant. But Oklahoma City would have even more leverage than the offseason. How could the Warriors entice the Thunder? If good enough, Oklahoma City might not be at-all willing to deal Russell Westbrook‘s co-star. (This could be a reason Westbrook has yet to sign a contract extension. If he waits to re-sign until next summer, he implicitly demands the Thunder not sell during the season – or leads to them trading Westbrook, too).

If George hits free agency, Golden State’s realistic chances of landing George likely evaporate. The Warriors would probably have to trade one of their top four players to get George. But doesn’t that kind of defeat the purpose?

Here is Stephen Curry playing against giant inflatable defenders in South Korea (VIDEO)

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There is an not a lot of understandable context to be given to the video above, so let’s just put it out there: I’m not really sure what is happening in this video of Stephen Curry playing a basketball in South Korea, but I am sort of into it.

The Golden State Warriors’ star point guard clearly enjoyed his recent trip to China, and this recent video of him in South Korea shows him balling it up on the court along side giant inflatable defenders. The show is called Infinite Challenge and features comedians (seen in the video) making commentary during the matchup.

We already saw Curry imitate teammate Klay Thompson‘s failed 360 dunk attempt while visiting abroad, so this isn’t really out of the ordinary.

The main highlights here are really the off-the-face-pass-to-himself move and the made halfcourt shot.

When is preseason, again?

Stephen Curry said he offered to take salary discount for Warriors

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Kevin Durant famously took $9.5 million less than he could have squeezed out of Golden State for next season, which Warriors GM Bob Myers has said helped the team re-sign Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, and David West, keeping the core of the championship Warriors together for at least a couple more seasons.

Stephen Curry said he offered to take a discount as well, but the team turned him down because it didn’t matter.

Curry said that to Marcus Thompson II of the new Athletic Bay Area.

Curry said he was willing to take less and told general manager Bob Myers as much.

“I actually asked Bob,” he said. “If I were to take a discount — at any number, I don’t know what it would be — how much of a difference would that make for us to be able to sign other guys. It wasn’t like (Kevin Durant’s) situation. His had a direct impact on us being able to sign Andre (Iguodala) and Shaun (Livingston). And it was just an unbelievable sacrifice by KD. But mine didn’t matter.”

The difference was “Bird rights” (named after Larry Bird), which allows a team to go over the cap to keep a player who has been on its roster a couple of years. Durant was only with the Warriors for one season, so the team didn’t have his Bird rights, meaning if he opted out and pushed for the max the Warriors would have had to clear out room under the cap to pay Durant that money. To do that, Iguodala and Livingston would have been gone in the least, and maybe much more. To keep the team together, Durant could qualify for a non-Bird cap exception if he asked for 120 percent of his salary from last season ($26.5 million), but he took about $7 million less than that and signed for $26 million (less than he made last season, and $1.7 million less than the player option he declined for next season). And with that, the Warriors stayed together.

In Curry’s case, the Warriors have his Bird rights so they can go over the cap and over the tax line to keep him, and they did inking him to the largest contract in NBA history at five-years, $201 million.

But it was nice of Curry to ask.

Durant can opt out next summer and the Warriors will have his Bird rights then, meaning they can max him out. Expect that to happen. Eventually, the tax bill may get so steep for this team that Warriors ownership — even with all the cash from the new building set to open in 2019 — and a player such as Klay Thompson may leave, but we are a couple of years away from that. For the next couple of seasons, these juggernaut Warriors are together.

Klay Thompson delivers impressive first pitch (video)

AP Photo/Jeff Chiu
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Warriors guard Klay Thompson threw out the first pitch at tonight’s San Francisco Giants-Oakland Athletics game.

Alex Pavlovic‏ of NBC Sports Bay Area:

This is where I remind you Klay Thompson’s brother, Trayce Thompson, is a professional baseball player.