Jordan Clarkson

Report: Lakers trade D’Angelo Russell, Timofey Mozgov to Nets for Brook Lopez, 27th pick

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The Lakers were looking to unload the Timofey Mozgov mistake they made last summer and start to clear out cap space for a push next summer.

The Brooklyn Nets were looking to move the expiring contract of Brook Lopez — and his quality offensive big man play — for a promising young player. Say, for example, D'Angelo Russell.

Those two sides have reached an agreement, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports.

The Lakers now have the No. 2, 27, and 28 pick in the first round (28th was Houston’s they got in the Lou Williams trade). Expect them to try and use those picks in a deal to get Paul George (throwing in Julius Randle or Jordan Clarkson), something Marc Stein of ESPN noted, but I doubt that’s enough.

As noted, for the Lakers this move is about clearing the way for Lonzo Ball, and to clear cap space in 2018 to chase LeBron James and, sign/re-sign Paul George. It’s a smart play by the Magic/Pelinka front office that could have the Lakers as a contender in 201-19 if the dominos all fall, but the price is fairly high because Russell has potential.

For the Nets, they get that potential. The Lakers had questions about Russell’s work ethic and maturity (re: the Nick Young mess), but he’s just 21 and nobody who watched him questions his ability to see the court off the pick-and-roll and make plays. He just has to start doing it consistently. Coach Kenny Atkinson and the Nets may be better able to develop him, he will see heavy P&R calls with the floor spread and some shooters around him. Brooklyn has the cap space to take on bad contracts like Mozgov to get guys they want, and this is a good reclamation process.

Rumor: Lakers will not include No. 2 pick, Brandon Ingram in Paul George deal. Why would they?

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With Paul George‘s people telling the Pacers he’s going to be a free agent next summer and wants to head to the Lakers, there is only one reason for the Lakers to get involved in a trade for him now: Fear he gets dealt to Cleveland or Miami or wherever, wins some, decides he likes it and stays.

The Lakers can be proactive and make a trade now, but they shouldn’t give up any player or pick they think has real value. Which brings us to something Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports said in his podcast this week (hat tip RealGM) :

“The Lakers aren’t giving them Brandon Ingram,” added Wojnarowski. “They aren’t giving them the No. 2 pick.”

Why would they? The Lakers shouldn’t overpay for a guy that wants to come there anyway. It probably goes beyond just those two things.

The Lakers might do one young player — Jordan Clarkson, Julius Randle — and the 28th overall pick in the draft (via Houston in the Lou Williams deal) to get something done. At most. L.A. would love to unload one of the bad Timofey Mozgov/Luol Deng contracts, but the Pacers are going to ask for more than one young player and one pick to take that on.

The Pacers are going to talk to every team in the league and take the best deal on the table. It’s simple for them. It seems unlikely the Lakers will have the best offer since they believe they can land him a year from now as a free agent and give up nothing.

 

Report: Lakers trying to acquire another first-round pick

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The Lakers, who have the Nos. 2 and 28 picks in the upcoming draft, were reportedly discussing trading the second pick.

What do they want?

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

The Los Angeles Lakers are trying to acquire another first-round pick for Thursday’s NBA draft, league sources told ESPN.

The Lakers have engaged at least two teams in the lottery, sources said, as they search for players to improve their outside shooting and perimeter defense.

While there have been inquires on the No. 2 pick, sources said it remains unlikely the Lakers would trade out of that position.

Trading down from No. 2 with the Kings, who have the Nos. 5 and 10 picks, would be a relatively simple way to land an extra first-rounder. But, as Shelburne says, the Lakers don’t seem particularly keen on parting with the second pick.

The Lakers have a roster full of players new team president Magic Johnson didn’t acquire, a fact he made glaringly clear when he declared everyone but Brandon Ingram tradable. D'Angelo Russell or Julius Randle – and maybe even Jordan Clarkson or Larry Nance Jr. – could fetch a first-rounder and allow Johnson to choose a player he wants rather than inherits.

We’re past the days of big-market teams like the Lakers just buying first-round picks. The salary scale and team control makes first-rounders just too valuable. But the Lakers have ammo to acquire another first-rounder.

They must be mindful of Paul George – what assets, if any, they want to trade for him. If they don’t trade, they need a plan to open max cap space for him next summer.

As long as they keep that in mind, there are plenty of logical ways for the Lakers to add a first-rounder while keeping the second pick. It’ll just cost them one of the talented young players they already have.

Report: Paul George tells Pacers he’s planning on leaving in 2018, wants to join Lakers

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Let the Paul George saga continue.

Booming news was dropped on Sunday, with Yahoo! Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reporting that George has apparently informed the Indiana Pacers that he will leave the team in free agency in 2018.

George’s top choice for his landing spot? The Los Angeles Lakers.

We’ve heard rumblings about this for months, but if Wojnarowski’s report is true then it will have a huge impact on the trade and free agency market not only in 2018 but in 2017 as well.

George’s reported informing of the Pacers also allows Indiana to make appropriate plans over the next year.

Via Yahoo! Sports:

George hasn’t requested a trade before he can opt out of his 2018-19 contract, but did have his agent, Aaron Mintz, tell new Indiana president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard that he wanted to be forthright on his plans and spare the franchise any confusion about his intentions, league sources told The Vertical.

George can sign a four-year deal worth as much as $130 million with Los Angeles next year. George is a Southern California native and playing for the Lakers would represent a homecoming for him.

George plans to play out the 2017-18 season with Indiana, but wants to give the organization the chance to plan appropriately for its future – which George told the team won’t include him, league sources said.

There now appears to be some kind of expectation that the Pacers and Lakers could initiate a trade for George, so Indiana doesn’t lose him completely as an asset. Julius Randle has been floated in trade talks — he doesn’t appear to fit Magic Johnson’s vision for the team — and could be part of a nice get in a package for George. Then again, if the Lakers are sure they’re going to get George anyway, that trade could come elsewhere. ESPN’s Ramona Shelburne is reporting that L.A. does not plan on trading young assets for George.

Indiana lost the opportunity to sign George to a Designated Player Veteran Exception when he missed the All-Star Game this year, but reading the situation at this point it’s hard to tell if that would have been a huge swing for the Pacers as they tried to keep their star. As noted above, L.A. can still give George a $130 million contract.

Meanwhile, the Lakers suddenly are in a great position to expand. With the No. 2 overall pick likely to be Lonzo Ball, a nice little core around D'Angelo Russell, Ball, George, Jordan Clarkson, and Brandon Ingram allows them lots of options around the wing and even more in the trade market.

This is a bummer for fans in Indiana, but we’re still a year away from George being gone. Things change, and the NBA is where crazy happens.

Another report that Lakers may not select Lonzo Ball with the No. 2 pick

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Lonzo Ball is a 6’6″ point guard who has incredible court vision and passing skills, whose ability to play in transition transformed UCLA this past season into one of the better teams in the nation.

However, he has some weaknesses — he isn’t strong as a pick-and-roll point guard, and his funky shooting stroke doesn’t work as well off the dribble — that have teams being hesitant.

Including the Lakers at No. 2. While most mock drafts still have the Lakers taking Ball, there are more and more rumblings that the Lakers are not sold. The latest of those comes from Jordan Schultz of the Huffington Post.

This time of year there are so many smokescreens by teams that it’s like being at a Cypress Hill concert. This could be part of that, the Lakers are reportedly testing the trade market for Jordan Clarkson which suggests they will take Ball.

I will say I’ve heard most teams don’t care about LaVar. They see him as a manageable distraction.

Most scouts have Ball second in this draft, but Josh Jackson out of Kansas is not as far behind as some think. De'Aaron Fox is climbing everybody’s board (and did outplay Ball head-to-head twice). While Ball is considered top two by most, not everyone is sold on Ball, one scout told me he sees Ball as a future solid NBA starting point guard, nothing more (not an All-Star player). The question for everyone in the draft is how much are they willing to put in the work to improve their weaknesses

The Lakers are not good enough to be thinking of drafting for need — what they need is talent. They need the best guy on the board. If they work out Jackson and rate him higher, then take him. If they love Fox, take him. They can’t take Ball just because it plays well with the fan base (the Southern California kid playing for his hometown team), if whoever they draft plays well the fans will come around. However, if they have Ball second, take him. (And why throw out a smokescreen, to throw Boston off? They’re taking Markelle Fultz.)

This will be the Lakers third consecutive No. 2 pick (D'Angelo Russell and Brandon Ingram) and they need a big hit here, they can’t afford a strikeout.