Giannis Antetokounmpo

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LeBron James, Stephen Curry take leads for All-Star captains in fan vote

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Giannis Antetokounmpo (East) and Kevin Durant (West) led their conferences in the initial All-Star voting returns, putting the Bucks and Warriors forwards in line to serve as captains in the new format.

Now, the presumptive favorites – LeBron James and Stephen Curry – have taken the lead.

The full leaderboard:

Eastern Conference

Frontcourt

1. LeBron James (CLE) 1,622,838

2. Giannis Antetokounmpo (MIL) 1,480,954

3. Joel Embiid (PHI) 784,287

4. Kristaps Porzingis (NYK) 640,928

5. Kevin Love (CLE) 458,157

6. Al Horford (BOS) 229,906

7. Jayson Tatum (BOS) 213,499

8. Enes Kanter (NYK) 159,010

9. Andre Drummond (DET) 139,226

10. Dwight Howard (CHA) 111,768

Guards

1. Kyrie Irving (BOS) 1,370,643

2. DeMar DeRozan (TOR) 537,168

3. Ben Simmons (PHI) 397,942

4. Victor Oladipo (IND) 385,448

5. Dwyane Wade (CLE) 353,273

6. John Wall (WAS) 328,215

7. Isaiah Thomas (CLE) 252,552

8. Kyle Lowry (TOR) 176,590

9. Bradley Beal (WAS) 151,765

10. Jaylen Brown (BOS) 103,622

Western Conference

Frontcourt

1. Kevin Durant (GSW) 1,326,059

2. Anthony Davis (NOP) 664,687

3. Draymond Green (GSW) 616,730

4. DeMarcus Cousins (NOP) 587,835

5. Paul George (OKC) 547,582

6. Kawhi Leonard (SAS) 446,133

7. Carmelo Anthony (OKC) 378,718

8. Kyle Kuzma (LAL) 325,903

9. Karl-Anthony Towns (MIN) 320,884

10. LaMarcus Aldridge (SAS) 315,918

Guards

1. Stephen Curry (GSW) 1,369,658

2. James Harden (HOU) 978,540

3. Russell Westbrook (OKC) 791,332

4. Klay Thompson (GSW) 686,825

5. Manu Ginobili (SAS) 657,827

6. Chris Paul (HOU) 331,522

7. Lonzo Ball (LAL) 294,197

8. Damian Lillard (POR) 266,519

9. Jimmy Butler (MIN) 173,245

10. Devin Booker (PHO) 162,970

Antetokounmpo could still overtake LeBron, and Kyrie Irving is also in striking distance of the East captaincy. Curry and Durant are running neck-and-neck in the West.

The rest of the fan voting doesn’t mean much anymore. It’ll serve as just 50% of the formula for selecting All-Star starters, the player (25%) and media (25%) vote also factoring. Each conference’s top two guards and top three frontcourt players in fan voting are likely All-Stars regardless, favored to be picked by reserve-selecting coaches if all else fails. With captains picking teams, I’m not even sure players designated “starters” will actually start. I don’t think people generally care whether someone starts or comes off the bench in the exhibition game, anyway.

Three Things to Know: Paul George loves Los Angeles, playing there is something else

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Paul George loves Los Angeles, but after his current team sweeps city does he want to go there? It’s the siren song of leading your hometown franchise vs. a team built to win right now. Paul George has a decision coming up this summer, and both sides made their case in the last 48 hours.

There was plenty of fodder for the “George wants to play for the Lakers” camp this week — buzz that started with his agent telling the Pacers exactly that last summer. (George seemed disinterested in the Clippers when it was brought up.) The best example of what playing in L.A. could offer was George draining a three against the Lakers Wednesday then running over to hug his mom courtside. Also, there was no shortage of quotes from George about how much he loves his hometown.

“It was awesome,” George said of his welcome in L.A. after his current team, the Thunder, thrashed the Lakers by almost 40. “For one, just being home, being in front of friends, family, and then just the respect, the love, the recruitment. It was awesome. It was awesome to get that love.”

On the other side, there’s the game on the court. The Thunder are winning, and the young Lakers look years away from contending even with a superstar. George got a view of that firsthand this week. Oklahoma City kept up its hot streak — the win over the Clippers Thursday 127-117 was the team’s eighth in 10 games — which should lead to plenty of optimism in the “George is going to stay with the Thunder” camp.

Or there’s this quote:

“If (the Thunder are) trending, if we’re going in the right direction, if I feel there is something that we’re building, and there’s a foundation — it would be kind of clueless, just stupid on my behalf to up and leave.”

George hasn’t made his call about next summer yet, he seems torn and is being patient. Westbrook is all in for Oklahoma City, having signed his max extension. Carmelo Anthony almost certainly opts into his $28 million final year (that money isn’t out there for him as a free agent). Meanwhile, George is playing it LeBron style, keeping all his options open and waiting until the summer. (The financial dance for the Thunder to keep George is a tough one for GM Sam Presti and ownership — they maxed out Westbrook, they would need to max out George, and everyone expects Anthony to opt in, sending the Thunder deep into the luxury tax, maybe too deep for a small market. No matter what ownership says.)

It’s not championship or bust to keep George in OKC, but the Thunder’s slow start dug them a deep hole. OKC is currently the fifth seed in the West and may well climb up to fourth, but they are four games back of the three-seed Spurs who just got Kawhi Leonard back, and the Rockets are out of reach. If the Thunder are the four seed it means a challenging first-round series (likely against the Timberwolves), then in the second round would be the Warriors. If Oklahoma City gets spanked by Golden State in that series it sends a message, if OKC pushes the defending champs hard it’s another.

George is going to wait and see. But we do know he loves Los Angeles.

2) Giannis Antetokounmpo ahead of LeBron James in first fan All-Star voting returns. It is a testament to what a superstar the Greek Freak has become: He, not LeBron James, would be one of the two captains to pick All-Star teams if All-Star voting ended today. In fan voting so far, Antetokounmpo is just 7,336 votes ahead of LeBron (with more than 85 million votes cast for each), but it’s a lead.

Antetokounmpo and Kevin Durant would be the captains, although Duran’s lead in the West over just-returned Stephen Curry is only 32,287 votes.

Just as a refresher: The NBA has thrown out the stale old East vs. West All-Star format for this year’s game — Feb. 18 in Los Angeles — and gone to a playground-style picking of teams format: The top vote-getters in each conference will be the captains and they will make the picks (from a pool of All-Stars). They can choose anyone from either conference — Durant is free to pick LeBron instead of Curry. Fan votes combined with select media will choose the starter pool of two guards and three frontcourt players from each conference (consider those media votes Zaza Pachulia insurance, fans almost voted him as a starter last season). The coaches will pick the seven reserves from each conference.

If the voting ended today (and the media agreed) the frontcourt players from the East would be Antetokounmpo, James, and Joel Embiid, paired with guards Kyrie Irving and DeMar DeRozan. Kristaps Porzingis is not far behind Embiid, and Victor Oladipo is close to taking DeRozan’s spot as a starter.

Out West, the starters voted into the pool would be Durant, Anthony Davis, and DeMarcus Cousins (yes, two Pelicans). The guards are Curry and James Harden. Draymond Green and Paul George are within striking distance of Cousins, while Russell Westbrook is third in the guard voting.

Voting is open through Jan. 15.

3) Warriors without Kevin Durant beat Rockets without James Harden. Do I even need to write “don’t read anything into this?”

No Durant or Harden throws a preview of playoff defensive matchups largely out the window (although overall the Rockets did a good job sniffing out the Warriors backcuts and floppy actions that usually lead to easy buckets). Aside the missing stars, Gerald Green went off for 8-of-15, and while that may give the Warriors something to think about it’s also not sustainable for Green (although someone on the Rockets always seems to step up).

Plus, we are more than four months away from a playoff series between these squads — both teams will evolve between now and then.

Basically, this game felt like a one-off. It was familiar only in Golden State’s pattern of owning a game late — the Warriors took over the final nine minutes to win 124-114. Curry and Klay Thompson combined for 57 points. With that the Warriors keep their perch on top of the West secure. But that’s about it.

Giannis Antetokounmpo, Kevin Durant top early All-Star voting

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If voting ended today (and the media votes agreed, which it likely would with these two), Giannis Antetokounmpo and Kevin Durant would be the captains picking the All-Star teams.

Those two are the top vote-getters in their conferences as the first round of fan All-Star voting was released by the NBA. However, both of them have a second-place person very close behind them: LeBron James in the East (7,336 votes back) and Stephen Curry in the West (32,287 votes back).

For this year’s All-Star Game in Los Angeles Feb. 18, the NBA has thrown out the old East vs. West All-Star format that had gotten stale and went to a schoolyard drafting of teams format: The top vote-getters in each conference will be the captains and pick the teams. They can choose anyone from any conference — if Durant wanted to pick LeBron instead of Curry, he could. First, the captains will choose from the pool of eight other starters voted in by fans and select media (consider those media votes the Zaza Pachulia insurance, fans almost voted him as a starter last season but the media did not). The coaches will pick the seven reserves from each conference, and the captains will move on to picking from that pool.

There are three frontcourt and two guard starters for each conference. Here is where the first round of voting stands:

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Frontcourt
1 Giannis Antetokounmpo (MIL) 863,416
2 LeBron James (CLE) 856,080
3 Joel Embiid (PHI) 433,161
—————–
4 Kristaps Porzingis (NYK) 359,459
5 Kevin Love (CLE) 221,969
6 Al Horford (BOS) 120,016
7 Jayson Tatum (BOS) 98,586
8 Andre Drummond (DET) 85,374
9 Enes Kanter (NYK) 83,102
10 Dwight Howard (CHA) 57,730

Guards
1 Kyrie Irving (BOS) 802,834
2 DeMar DeRozan (TOR) 259,368
—————
3 Victor Oladipo (IND) 251,886
4 Ben Simmons (PHI) 210,085
5 John Wall (WAS) 175,990
6 Dwyane Wade (CLE) 165,163
7 Isaiah Thomas (CLE) 87,680
8 Kyle Lowry (TOR) 85,070
9 Bradley Beal (WAS) 71,079
10 Jaylen Brown (BOS) 51,562

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Frontcourt
1 Kevin Durant (GSW) 767,402
2 Anthony Davis (NOP) 393,000
3 DeMarcus Cousins (NOP) 356,340
—————
4 Draymond Green (GSW) 325,612
5 Paul George (OKC) 291,495
6 Kawhi Leonard (SAS) 212,650
7 Carmelo Anthony (OKC) 194,239
8 Karl-Anthony Towns (MIN) 188,240
9 Kyle Kuzma (LAL) 184,338
10 LaMarcus Aldridge (SAS) 153,599

Guards
1 Stephen Curry (GSW) 735,115
2 James Harden (HOU) 602,040
———–
3 Russell Westbrook (OKC) 438,469
4 Klay Thompson (GSW) 359,442
5 Manu Ginobili (SAS) 231,460
6 Chris Paul (HOU) 174,343
7 Damian Lillard (POR) 148,622
8 Lonzo Ball (LAL) 120,817
9 Devin Booker (PHO) 91,562
10 Jimmy Butler (MIN) 88,009

Both Pelicans’ big men Davis and Cousins would start with the Warriors’ Green and the Thunders’ George on the outside looking in. With the West guards, Westbrook would be the guy coming off the bench with Curry and Harden starting (hard to go wrong with any order there). In the East, Sixers rookie Embiid would get the nod over the Knicks’ Porzingis.

Voting runs through midnight on Jan. 15. Fans can vote on the NBA.com voting page, through the NBA app, on Facebook (post the player’s first and last name along with the hashtag #NBAVOTE on your personal Facebook account, Twitter (Tweet, retweet or reply with an NBA player’s first and last name or Twitter handle, along with the hashtag #NBAVOTE, or even on Amazon Alexa (say “Alexa, open NBA All-Star,” and then vote for whoever you want).

NBA confirms obvious: Giannis Antetokounmpo stepped out before game-winner

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This is about as surprising as the end of the movie “Dunkirk.” (Unless you slept through History 101.)

In the NBA’s official Last Two Minute Report from the Bucks win over the Thunder, the NBA confirmed that Giannis Antetokounmpo did step out of bounds on what eventually was the game-winning shot. Referee Leon Wood just missed it. (Also, the NBA ruled that Antetokounmpo did not travel on that last shot, remember he gets a gather step as he takes control of the ball, then his steps — Antetokounmpo can cover a lot of ground in a couple of steps.)

The play was not reviewed at the time.

I don’t blame official Leon Wood for missing the call in real time — human beings make mistakes. It happens. But either the NBA should live with the mistakes of human beings and do away with replay all together, or it needs to make sure that all crucial late-game plays can be reviewed. The idea that the officials could review if a player’s foot in on the arc and the bucket is a 2 or a 3 during the second quarter, but they couldn’t review the Greek Freak stepping out of bounds, is just wrong. Either you’re trying to get the calls right, or you’re living with the mistakes. There’s a fine line in terms of slowing the game down with delays, but if the goal is to get it right then the league needs to get it right.

Giannis Antetokounmpo dunk beats Thunder, but refs missed him stepping out of bounds

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It would have been one of the most dramatic game winners of the season — after a Russell Westbrook three tied the game seconds earlier, Giannis Antetokounmpo‘s drive and dunk over Westbrook gave the Bucks the win over the Thunder.

Except it was mired in controversy —  when Antetokounmpo spun baseline and drove he clearly stepped out of bounds. Watch the video, he clearly steps on the line.

Paul George — out for the game due to left knee soreness — was incredulous.

Why wasn’t the play reviewed and the call reversed? Because there was no call to reverse, according to the officials.

There should be a review of the play — this is why there needs to be a close look by the league at the review process after the season. I’m not going to blame the referees here, they are trying to watch for fouls and so much more, and at full speed that is something that a human being will miss. If we’re going to live with human mistakes late, why have replay at all? If the goal is to get the calls right, they need to get it right. The idea that they could review if a foot is on the line for a two or a three, but this cannot be reviewed, is just wrong.

It’s time to review the review process.