Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade on why he exercised his player option: ’24 million reasons’

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Dwyane Wade said he wanted to see the Bulls’ direction – winning now with Jimmy Butler or rebuilding? – before deciding on his $23.8 million player option for next season.

While Chicago was actively shopping Butler (before eventually trading him to the Timberwolves), Wade opted in, anyway.

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

This is most real answer answer you’ll ever see. Props to Wade for his directness.

This also speaks to the unlikelihood of him accepting a buyout, no matter how poorly he fits with the rebuilding Bulls now – though maybe he’d accept a small pay cut to choose another team.

After trading Jimmy Butler to Minnesota, where do the Bulls go from here?

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Jimmy Butler is now a member of the Minnesota Timberwolves. In a draft day trade, the Timberwolves received Jimmy Butler and reunited him with his old coach from Chicago Tom Thibodeau. In exchange for the shooting guard, the Chicago Bulls received the No. 7 overall pick — Chicago took Arizona’s Lauri MarkkanenKris Dunn, and Zach LaVine.

The question now in Chicago is this: now what?

Butler, 27, was the superstar the Bulls needed post-Derrick Rose. Now, with Butler gone, the Bulls will need to rebuild in a year in which they have young assets mixed with older, more expensive players that don’t seem to match up. After a year in which Chicago just barely made the playoffs with the eight seed, they are going to need to readjust their entire roster. That could mean new landing places for Rajon Rondo, Dwyane Wade, and Robin Lopez.

Forget on the on-floor performance for a moment, the real question for Chicago will be how to properly allocate their resources when it comes to salary in the coming season. Wade, 35, will reportedly opt into the final year of his contract to play for his hometown team despite Butler moving to Minnesota. Chicago will earn the right to pay Wade $23.8 million for this upcoming season. Rondo is in much the same boat, with $13.4 million left in the final year of his contract.

From a wins perspective, both players would no doubt be highly crucial to any wins this new Bulls team would garner in the coming season. But both players have a staggering amount of salary left, and would no doubt take up valuable playing time for the young, newly acquired players that the Bulls should want to develop.

The most obvious choice for both Rondo and Wade would be waivers or buyouts. Rondo’s contract only has $3 million left on it if he is bought out before June 30. Despite a solid playoff performance, Rondo does not have a $13 million value to the Bulls in terms of playing time, and they don’t have a need for whatever erratic play he may bring to the table.

While the Butler trade created a $15.3 million exception for the Bulls, Wade’s contract stands as an albatross that is in the way of both free agency this season and extensions for young players in the coming season. Chicago is facing restricted free agency for Nikola Mirotic come July, and will need to figure out what to do with younger players like Michael Carter-Williams and Cristiano Felicio.

After decisions are made this summer for those players, the Bulls will need to figure out how to sign LaVine to an extension. Given the market for players of his caliber and position, LaVine will almost certainly command a number comparable to what Wade’s salary currently occupies on the Chicago cap space.

This is all before we even get to Lopez, who has $26 million left on his contract for the next two seasons. While he is still a productive player, at age 29 it’s unclear at how much Lopez factors into Chicago’s future plans. Given his contract situation it might be better to try to move him as a means to acquire new assets that are closer in age to the Bulls’ new core.

If your head is not spinning by now, you’re one of the lucky ones. It just gets worse from here.

It seems highly probable that Rondo will be waived or bought out in order to minimize the impact he has on the cap this season. He doesn’t glean much on the trade market given his current full contract value, and his an uneasy play (despite his playoff prowess) is something that that has driven potential trade suitors away.

What to do with Wade is an entirely different conversation. If Chicago decided to buy him out this summer it would be a clear choice of direction in terms of both the roster makeup and the playing time allotted to the new young backcourt at the United Center. The Bulls would immediately become ultra flexible, and able to match a restricted offer for Mirotic without fearing any kind of retribution down the line for when they try to sign other players in free agency or offer LaVine an extension.

Then again, they could wait to buy him out until later in the season, say, around the All-Star Game, all the while taking in ticket sales for Chicago fans to see their hometown star. There is no doubt that Wade would be a good influence on younger players in the locker room, despite the high price tag. If they want to buy him out later in the season, he could join another team in time for a playoff run. That might convince Wade to take a larger amount off of his contract come buyout time.

Lost in the sauce of all this contract talk is just what the Bulls are doing with their future. LaVine looked excellent before his ACL injury in 2016-17, and Dunn had promise despite a disappointing first season in Minnesota. By all accounts, the Bulls gave up too much in their trade with the Timberwolves, with most lamenting their decision to send the No. 16 pick to Minnesota despite Chicago giving up the best player in the swap.

There’s also the matter of the Bulls trading Jordan Bell to the Golden State Warriors straight up for cash considerations. Bell was an excellent player at Oregon, and would have a fit right in with Chicago’s new young core. Given that there is an issue with the Chicago front line when it comes to Mirotic’s RFA contract and Felicio’s free agency, the idea that Bell would not have fit in with the young Bulls is sort of baffling.

Yes, Chicago selected Lauri Markkanen with the No. 7 overall pick, but the University of Arizona product is not projected to be enough of a influence to suggest Bell had to be moved. Bell is almost certainly getting sent to the G-League for the Warriors, but he could have played a role for a team in Chicago that needs theirs defined. If the Butler trade was symbolic of their new direction, perhaps the Bell-for-cash swap was most emblematic of how the Bulls do business.

At the end of the day, Chicago’s trade with Minnesota sending Butler back to Thibodeau feels hilariously lopsided, and pushes the full reset for the Bulls in the years since Rose, Joakim Noah, and Taj Gibson led the team. Unless either LaVine, Markkanen, or Dunn exceed Butler’s performance for Chicago, it’s unlikely that history will look kindly at this trade. When the Bulls brought in Wade and Rondo last season, it looked like the team that once challenged in the Eastern Conference had started their decline. Once Rondo and Wade are gone, we’re likely to see the bottom for Chicago.

Report: Bulls trading Jimmy Butler to Timberwolves for Zach LaVine, Kris Dunn, No. 7

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Jimmy Butler trade rumors heated up on draft night last year.

This year, they reached fever pitch.

Now, the Bulls are actually dealing him.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

This isn’t nearly enough for Butler, a true star. He’s 27 and locked up for two more years.

Zach LaVine is a nice young player, but overrated due to his inflated points-per-game number. Kris Dunn looked passive on both ends of the floor as a rookie. The No. 7 pick comes in a relatively strong area of this draft, but Chicago is just trading up nine spots – not even acquiring an extra pick.

And the Bulls couldn’t have agreed to this trade before Dwyane Wade opted in and locked into a high salary that inhibits rebuilding?

Whether Chicago should have stuck with general manager Gar Forman or then-coach Tom Thibodeau a couple years ago has been debated and re-debated since the Bulls fired Thibodeau. This trade certainly indicates Thibodeau, now Minnesota’s president-coach, better knew what he was doing.

Report: Dwyane Wade will opt-in with Bulls, picking up $23.8 million along the way

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If the Cleveland Cavaliers had put up more of a fight against the Golden State Warriors, perhaps we wouldn’t be here. Perhaps because Stephen Curry & Co. put the hurt on LeBron James in a 4-1 series, we are.

Dwyane Wade will be staying with the Chicago Bulls for the final year of his contract, according to a report from ESPN.

Wade, 35, had a player option for the 2017-18 season in Chicago that will pay him $23.8 million next year for his services. The aging future Hall of Famer played in 60 games last season for the Bulls.

Via ESPN:

Dwyane Wade has informed the Bulls that he will pick up his $23.8 million player option for next season, a league source told ESPN.

Team personnel have believed for several months that the 35-year-old would pick up the option because it was highly unlikely he would be offered that much money on the open market.

Of course, an NBA team would have to be crazy to give wade more money than $24 million a season given his mileage and limited production. The only chance Wade had to not grab his payday would have been if he began ring chasing to end his career, most likely with a certain former Miami Heat teammate in Ohio.

Meanwhile, it appears that Jimmy Butler will be back with Chicago as of publication. While the Cavaliers have also tried to acquire Butler, he has reportedly told the Cleveland he wishes to stay in Chicago and would be wary of signing with them long-term.

Report: Bulls “actively shopping” Jimmy Butler for trade; Cavaliers, Celtics at front of line

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Retool around Jimmy Butler or trade him and rebuild completely?

That was the question hanging over the Bulls for at least a year now, and it has been hard to read what Bulls management was thinking, their actions were inconsistent. Last year they were going to go young, then went out and signed Dwyane Wade and Rajon Rondo.

Now it looks like trading him may be the call. From Vincent Goodwill of CSNChicago.com.

The Bulls routinely say they’ll take phone calls from teams about Butler’s availability around this time and at the trade deadline but this time around, multiple sources tell CSNChicago.com the Bulls are doing more than listening: they’re shopping Butler to many teams….

The Boston Celtics have always been fond of Butler and have the assets the Bulls, in theory, would be attracted to in terms of multiple draft picks and affordable contracts on the current roster. The Cleveland Cavaliers seemed to be on the Bulls’ doorstep before abruptly ending their partnership with GM David Griffin Monday evening.

On the surface they would appear to be the favorites as the Phoenix Suns have been “doing due diligence,” according to league sources. And the Denver Nuggets were on the periphery at the trade deadline, acquiring about Butler.

The most interesting thing is that the Bulls seem serious this time. Maybe. Ownership there doesn’t like the idea of a rebuild, they want to make the playoffs every year and sell out (contending is nice but not required). This would be a rebuild and the Bulls are out of the playoffs for a few years. Butler has said he wants to stay, and he likely would qualify for a designated player super max contract in 2019 when he is a free agent if they want to keep him.

The Celtics would be interesting, they have the pieces to pull this off, but in the past they haven’t put all that on the table for Butler. If they are willing to trade the No. 3 plus two of Avery Bradley, Marcus Smart, and Jae Crowder, then they would only need to make a few smaller moves to still have the money to still chase Gordon Hayward in free agency with a max offer, stockpiling their team. If they trade all three players they would have space, but the Bulls likely want picks in this deal. Plural.

Butler wants to go to the Cavaliers, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. David Griffin reportedly left the Cavaliers proposals they could pitch for Butler (and Paul George), but could owner Dan Gilbert and defacto GM Koby Altman really pull that off? I’m not convinced, mostly because the Cavaliers don’t have a pick to trade until 2021, so it would take a third team and delicate negotiations.

The Nuggets have a lot of good assets, and you slide Butler next to Jamal Murray, getting passes from Nikola Jokic, and you have something there. The Suns have assets as well.

The only question is if the Bulls are really serious this time.