Dejounte Murray

Manu Ginobili game-winner caps 13-0 closing run to rally Spurs past Mavericks

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) — At 40 years old, Manu Ginobili‘s refusal to slow down in his 16th season with the Spurs has been a source of inspiration to the team’s young core.

The man and the mantra helped propel San Antonio to an improbable victory over Dallas on Saturday night.

LaMarcus Aldridge had 22 points and 14 rebounds and the Spurs scored the final 13 points of the game, rallying for a 98-96 victory over the Mavericks.

Aldridge’s fall-away, 11-foot jumper tied the game at 96 with 23.4 seconds remaining and Ginobili’s driving layup with 3.1 seconds was the game-winning shot.

“He’s our grandpa,” 21-year-old Dejounte Murray said, chuckling afterwards. “He’s a beast, man. You’ve all seen what he’s done for this organization and he’s still around giving his wisdom to all the new guys. To see him coming in every day, I mean there’s not one day I’ve seen Manu not show up at the facility. Being a young guy, I’ve got to be there every day.”

Ginobili’s layup off the left side of the glass gave the Spurs their first lead of the game after trailing by as many as 16 points.

“We did a lot of good things, but the ending is unforgiveable,” Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said.

Maxi Kleber had 21 points and Dirk Nowitzki added 19 for Dallas in the final regular season matchup between the Southwest Division rivals.

Kleber’s 3-pointer gave Dallas a 96-85 lead with 4:11 remaining, but the Spurs held them scoreless the remainder of the game.

The Mavericks drought included a turnover when Wes Matthews was unable to inbound the ball with 23.4 seconds remaining. Mathews threw the ball at Ginobili’s legs to avoid a 5-second violation, but the Spurs gained possession when the ball ricocheted off Matthews just as he stepped inbounds.

“We did everything right to lose,” Nowitzki said. “We missed shots offensively, bad turnover, gave them some offensive rebounds. Letting Ginobili go left down the stretch to lay it in. We literally had to do everything perfect to lose this one and we did.”

Aldridge had his 12th double-double of the season to help offset the absences of starters Kawhi Leonard, Tony Parker and Danny Green.

Coming off a 15-point blowout in Houston on Friday night, San Antonio was able to avoid its third straight loss.

“We played with everybody in Houston and hoped to play a good game in which we could grow and learn from our mistakes while playing against the best team in the NBA right now and I don’t think we got anything out of it,” Ginobili said. “So, if after that poor effort we came here and played badly again and lost, it would’ve been a tough one. We are proud of this win.”

The Spurs missed their first five shots, all short jumpers from Aldridge and Pau Gasol, on their way to shooting 30 percent in the opening quarter. The Mavericks took advantage, charging to a 31-18 lead after the first quarter.

San Antonio’s reserves reversed the team’s fortunes in the third quarter.

Davis Bertans finished with 13 points and Ginobili added 12 off the bench.

 

Gregg Popovich on LaMarcus Aldridge: “We’d really be lost without him”

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Last summer, trade rumors were swirling around LaMarcus Aldridge amid reports he was not happy in San Antonio. While Twitter buzzed with trade possibilities, Aldridge sat down with Gregg Popovich and they talked about how he could be used better — and in ways he was more comfortable — in the Spurs offense. No trade was made, Aldridge returned to Spurs camp this fall.

The Spurs knew they were going into the season without Tony Parker, a key part of their depth (and their most reliable pick-and-roll player). Then came the news they would be without Kawhi Leonard (19 games and counting).

The Spurs are a solid 12-7 to start the season, and Popovich gave a lot of credit for that to Aldridge, speaking to Michael C. Wright of ESPN.

“He’s gotten us through this period of time without Tony and Kawhi in a wonderful way,” Popovich said of Aldridge. “He’s scoring, he’s playing defense, rebounding, running the floor. We’d really be lost without him.”

Aldridge is playing at an All-Star level, averaging 22.2 points and 8.3 rebounds a game, but it’s his efficiency that has impressed — while taking on more of the offense, he has a career-high True Shooting Percentage of 57.3, and his PER of 25.6 also would be a career best. His assist rates are up, his turnover rates down, and he is taking fewer midrange jumpers (even though he can hit them) and shooting more at the rim or from three.

The Spurs wins are more than just Aldridge. Pau Gasol has played well, Kyle Anderson has gone in slo-mo right past everyone to a big step forward in his game, and Dejounte Murray has given them strong minutes at the point. It’s been a group effort, as Spurs GM R.C. Buford pointed out.

“The team’s done a terrific job of coming together. A lot of new players,” Buford told ESPN. “I think Pau [Gasol] and LaMarcus have obviously been significant and the contributions of other guys who have filled in and come together well. We’re obviously not the best team in the league. But the group has taken care of its responsibilities in a way that puts them in a position to win.

If the Spurs can integrate Leonard back into this roster and build on it, they become a lot more dangerous. That’s not as easy as it sounds, Leonard will get a lot of touches and shots, but if you’re going to trust any coach with that job Popovich is the call.

Raptors’ Kyle Lowry: I was interested in signing with Spurs, but they didn’t want me

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Kyle Lowry might be the best player in Raptors history.

But entering last offseason, both sides sounded ready to part ways.

The Spurs, 76ers and Timberwolves were rumored potential destinations for Lowry as an unrestricted free agency. And apparently at least San Antonio was a viable destination to him.

Lowry, via Jabari Young of the San Antonio Express-News:

“It was real for me,” Lowry told the Express-News, “but it wasn’t real for them. That’s a part of the business that people don’t know. I would have loved to come here, but it didn’t work out. The conversation didn’t happen. If the conversation happened, I would tell you. But it didn’t happen.

“Not saying that I wanted out, but I did look at teams to see what was going on,” said Lowry. “I mean this place would’ve been a great place.”

Lowry probably received less interest than he expected last summer. The 31-year-old settled for a three-year, $100 million contract with the Raptors – a sizable deal to be sure, but well below his max. I doubt he’s unhappy to return to Toronto, but joining championship-contending San Antonio obviously held appeal.

The Spurs cleared enough cap space to land a star like Lowry by getting Pau Gasol to opt out, but they wound up just reinvesting it in their aging core. Maybe it was Chris Paul or bust. Dejounte Murray looks much improved as San Antonio’s starting point guard, and Tony Parker is recovering from the injury that made Lowry and Paul rumored targets last offseason. The Spurs will probably be fine, but they might have been better off with Lowry. He would have likely cost them Patty Mills (who re-signed last summer), not Murray.

Three questions the San Antonio Spurs must answer this season

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The NBC/ProBasketballTalk season previews will ask the questions each of the 30 NBA teams must answer this season to make their season a success. We are looking at one team a day until the start of the season, and it begins with a look back at the team’s offseason moves.

Last season: 61-21, advanced to the Western Conference Finals, where Kawhi Leonard rolled an ankle (thank you Zaza Pachulia) and they got swept by the Warriors.

I know what you did last summer: They kept the status quo going. The Spurs re-signed Patty Mills (probably overpaying, but they had to with Tony Parker injured to start the season). Pau Gasol opted out and re-signed, again for maybe more than the market would have given him. The Spurs brought back Manu Ginobili. They signed Rudy Gay, who is coming off an Achilles injury. The losses were solid bench players Dewayne Dedmon and Jonathon Simmons.

THREE QUESTIONS THE SPURS MUST ANSWER

1) Is Kawhi Leonard healthy, and can he stay that way? We saw in the playoffs last season what happens to this team when Leonard goes down, and it’s not pretty. Leonard is a top five NBA player who is both the focal point of the Spurs offense and the best perimeter defender in the NBA (that’s not just my opinion, the NBA GMs voted him that). The Spurs ask a lot of Leonard and he answered last season with an MVP-level performance.

That’s why it raised a few eyebrows that Leonard is sitting out the preseason to rest his right quadriceps tendinopathy (an inflammation of the tendon just above the kneecap in the thigh), especially after Gregg Popovich said it was something he battled last season. Is Leonard going to miss time at the start of this season because of it? Will it require him getting more rest days during the season?

We know what the Spurs are going to do — defend well, move the ball, not beat themselves. San Antonio is going to have a hard time getting near that 61 win total of a year ago in a loaded West, but without the full Kawhi Leonard treatment they could slide a little further down the board. Nobody is betting on the Spurs to collapse, but did the Rockets and Thunder pass them by?

2) Is playing big the antidote to a league going small? It seems like the entire NBA is going smaller, trying to emulate the Warriors and their death lineup. Cleveland will be starting Kevin Love at the five this season. Houston will play fast and small.

“Golden State is an anomaly, with the group of players they have,” Popovich said last preseason. “And they’re a monster. Definitely the toughest team in the league to guard. But the rest of us poor fools, 29 of us, are kind of a hybrid. Everybody tries to be flexible. Not team is going to be all big or all small. Every game, teams play small for a while, they play big for a while. That’s the way it is. That’s the truth.”

The Spurs zigged when the league zagged — they are a big team that starts Pau Gasol and LaMarcus Aldridge up front and have real size in their defenders such as Leonard or Danny Green. This is not an accident. The Spurs have some versatility, but they want a lineup that can give small lineups trouble and push them around a little. It worked last regular season, and we didn’t get a real chance to see how it would have worked against the Warriors in the playoffs. But as those big men age and get a little slower, will going big still work as well.

3) Can the Spurs bench again be the NBA’s best? Or, to put that another way, what guy we don’t recall them drafting is going to come out of nowhere and impress us this season?

Once again last season the Spurs bench was the best in the NBA, outscoring teams by 8.9 points per 100 possessions over the course of the season. That is a key reason they win 55+ games every season — their bench comes in and executes at a high level, extending leads.

This season that bench will be a little thinner without Dewayne Dedmon and Jonathon Simmons, two guys who brought real athleticism off the bench. Still they have the legend that is Manu Ginoboili, Rudy Gay (who is playing in the preseason but may be slowed for a bit coming off an Achilles injury), plus guys like Dejounte Murray, Kyle Anderson, Davis Bertans, and now Joffrey Lauvergne. For the Spurs to keep on winning like we expect, Popovich needs to work his magic and turn these guys into one of the league’s most formidable benches. Again.

Manu Ginobili signs two-year deal to return to Spurs

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Manu Ginobili isn’t exactly an ageless wonder, his athleticism and game have slipped in recent years, but there are a lot of teams who wish they had a creative playmaker and solid three-point shooter off the bench as good as the 40-year-old Argentinian.

Which is why the Spurs wanted to keep him. Ginobili is returning to the Spurs on a two-year contract, a story broken by Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports, then confirmed by the Spurs.

Ginobili coming off the bench as a secondary playmaker with Dejounte Murray or, once healthy, Tony Parker (who could eventually push Patty Mills to a backup role) is huge for the Spurs. Even at his age, what Ginobili brings is key for the Spurs reserves. He shot 39.2 percent from three, more than one-in-five of his possessions used ends in an assist, and he’s cagey enough to always seem to be in the right place.

Plus, this is just how the Spurs work — they keep the family together.

The gamble here is health. Ginobili is going to get rested at points during the season, but he missed 13 games last season and is not getting younger.

Ginobili is a four-time NBA champion, two-time All-NBA, Sixth Man of the Year, and a future Hall of Famer who is just a joy to watch play, even at his age. It’s good to have him still in the league.