DeAndre Jordan

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NBA Power Rankings: Boston vaults to top, Warriors moving up

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From No. 14 to No. 1 in a week? The first few weeks of the power rankings things are volatile and this is just Week 2 of our rankings — we’re just figuring out who teams are, there’s a small sample size, and teams make big leaps up and down the board. Boston and Detroit make big moves up the ladder this week, but can they sustain it?

 
Celtics small icon 1. Celtics (5-2, Last Week No. 14). They have won five in a row, they have the best defense in the NBA so far (much better than expected), and Marcus Morris could return this week, adding front court depth. Early on the Celtics have flipped preseason prognostication on its head — they have an elite defense despite dumping their best defenders over the summer, but they are 18th in offense. They miss the glue that was Gordon Hayward on that end.

 
Grizzlies small icon 2. Grizzlies (5-2, Last Week No. 2). They are doing this with a very good defense (which we expected) and an offense that is knocking down more threes than it used to and is getting to the foul line at a higher rate than any team in the league. They are getting something out of Chandler Parsons this season, which is a boost. Starting Saturday they head out on a five-game road trip that will be a real test.

 
Warriors small icon 3. Warriors (5-3 LW 5). Did they snap out of their malaise with that blowout win over the Clippers? Maybe, we will get a better sense of that when they face the Spurs Thursday night on TNT. Either way, there is no panic in the Warriors locker room, Steve Kerr reminded everyone the 1998 Jordan Bulls started 8-7, but went on to win the NBA title, their third straight. Kerr said that team felt like this one early, just mentally fatigued.

 
Rockets small icon 4. Rockets (5-3, LW 3). The Rockets were in vintage form against the Hornets last Friday — 57 three-point attempts and just 28 midrange shots. That game was the outlier, the Rockets lead the NBA in percentage of shots from the midrange, which is not good. The Rockets offense is 15th in the league right now, and playing at the 20th fastest pace. Is that due to giving heavy minutes to defenders such as P.J. Tucker and Luc Mbah a Moute? Either way, they miss Chris Paul.

 
Clippers small icon 5. Clippers (4-2 LW 3). It’s a bit of a small sample size mirage, but with DeAndre Jordan and Patrick Beverley leading the way, the Clippers have a Top-10 defense in the NBA (it was first before the Warriors thrashed them, but first was always a bit optimistic). Blake Griffin took too many midrange jumpers in years past (he could hit them, but not at a high enough rate), but that has changed this season with him taking 32 threes and 9 midrange shots. Plus, Griffin is clutch.

 
Thunder small icon 6. Thunder (4-3 LW 12).. They have been better than their record shows so far this young season. The big three are starting to figure things out on offense (I love the way they use Carmelo Anthony with the second unit), but the big question is who is the fifth starter. Well, that’s one big question, the other is why is this team struggling so much on the defensive glass (they are 25th in the league in defensive rebounding percentage)?

 
Magic small icon 7. Magic (5-2, LW 11). The biggest change in Orlando is not how well Aaron Gordon is playing this season — although he has impressed and dropped 41 on the Nets — but it’s the pace. Orlando is playing at the third fastest pace in the NBA this young season, faster than the Warriors or Lakers and Lonzo Ball. They haven’t been incredibly efficient in transition (56.8% eFG%) and they are taking too many midrange shots (and not enough at the rim), which makes us wonder if this is sustainable.

 
Wizards small icon 8. Wizards (4-2, LW 6). After a slow start to the season in terms of taking and making threes, the Wizards have started to find a groove the past few games (17-of-34 against the Kings, for example). They have already blown two 10-point leads this season. Washington is entering a soft part of the schedule the next couple of weeks (7-of-9 at home, a lot of losing teams) so they need to fatten up the win total now.

 
Raptors small icon 9. Raptors (4-2, LW 10). They are 2-2 four games into a rough six-game road swing, which has included losses to San Antonio and Golden State where Toronto had fourth quarter leads but could not execute and hold on down the stretch. On the bright side, they held the Blazers to six points in one quarter. Also, Pascal Siakam has really taken a step forward this season.

Pistons small icon 10. Pistons (5-3, LW 21). They beat the Warriors, Clippers, and Timberwolves on a three-game win streak, which is impressive. We’re still a little skeptical that they can sustain this level — their starters have been outscored by 36 points so far this season — but the improvement from Reggie Jackson (who has looked closer to his old self) is a good sign. Regardless, they look like a playoff team in an upside-down East early.

 
Spurs small icon 11. Spurs (4-3, LW 1). After a 4-0 start they dropped three in a row on their recent road trip. The good news is they have held their own without Kawhi Leonard and are home for 8 of their next 10, giving them a chance to keep banking wins without their best player. Showdown with the Warriors coming Thursday night on TNT.

 
Bucks small icon 12. Bucks (4-3 LW 9). Giannis Antetokounmpo keeps putting up stunning point totals — 28, 33, and 28 this week — but also is playing 37.4 minutes per game right now (third highest in the league). They are getting decent bench play, Jason Kidd may want to trust it more, even with Greg Monroe out for a couple week. Tough four game road trip starts Wednesday and includes the Cavaliers and Spurs.

 
Blazers small icon 13. Trail Blazers (4-3 LW 8). That six-point quarter against Toronto was UGLY, but let’s not dwell on it. The Blazers are the second-best offensive rebounding team in the NBA to start the season, grabbing a ridiculous 28.6 percent of their missed shots. Portland has had a soft schedule to start the season, when they have faced quality teams such as the Clippers and Raptors they lost. The next week sees the Jazz, Thunder, and Grizzlies, and we’ll get a better sense of how good this team really is.

 
timberwolves small icon 14. Timberwolves (4-3, LW 13). This was supposed to be the season Minnesota got better on defense, but early in the season they are dead last in the league on that end, allowing 113.3 points per 100 possessions. That’s very concerning. This team has beaten a good Thunder team twice with Jimmy Butler but lost to the Pacers (without Myles Turner) and Pistons without him, reverting to a lot of old, bad habits.

 
Jazz small icon 15. Jazz (4-3, LW 16). As expected, their defense is fantastic (fourth in the NBA and improving) but the offense relies on spurts from guys who have hot games, like Donovan Mitchell did with 22 against the Lakers. Mitchell also broke out this nastiness against the Lakers.

 
Hornets small icon 16. Hornets (4-3, LW 18). Dwight Howard was brought in to return the Charlotte defense to form, and he has helped make this a top-10 defense again early in the season. Problem is, the offense has fallen to 21st in the league and doesn’t get enough points in the paint. Tough week ahead with the Bucks, then on the road against the Spurs, Timberwolves, and Celtics.

 
Cavaliers small icon 17. Cavaliers (3-4 LW 7). Going through a soft spot in the schedule they lost four of five, and in those five games they had the second worst defense in the NBA and were outscored by 11.2 points per 100 possessions. Their transition defense and rotations are a mess. LeBron has been the lone bright spot and Friday night against the Wizards he should hit another milestone and score the 29,000th point of his career, the youngest player (at 32) to do it.

 
Pacers small icon 18. Pacers (4-3, LW 20). Myles Turner is still sidelined with a concussion, but the Pacers offense is a surprise third in the NBA this young season thanks to Victor Oladipo — averaging 23.9 points per game with a 63.5 true shooting percentage — plus some very good play from Domantas Sabonis. That Paul George trade suddenly doesn’t look so bad.

 
Pelicans small icon 19. Pelicans (3-4 LW 22). Not to ruin a secret coming out later soon, but after DeMarcus Cousins destroyed his old team in Sacramento then dropped a triple-double on the Cavaliers, he won the PBT Extra player of the week (video coming). The Pelicans also got Anthony Davis back in the lineup, and when those two are on the court together this season the Pelicans are +44, when they are not the team is -53. Depth remains the issue.

 
Knicks small icon 20. Knicks (3-3, LW 28). About those rebuilding Knicks, as Bobby Marks of ESPN notes, they have the third oldest roster in the East, both raw totals and when waited by playing time. Those old guys can crash the glass however — the Knicks are they best offensive rebounding team in the league this young season, grabbing a second chance on 29.5 percent of their missed shots.

 
Sixers small icon 21. 76ers (3-4, LW 23). Markelle Fultz is sidelined for a while to get his shoulder right, which is what the team should have done all along. Ben Simmons continues to be fantastic early in the season, racking up a triple-double in Dallas and prompting Mavericks’ coach Rick Carlisle to say he thought Simmons would be good, but the kid is beating expectations.

 
Nuggets small icon 22. Nuggets (3-4, LW 17). What happened to the Nuggets’ offense? They are scoring 10 points per 100 possessions fewer than they did after All-Star break last season. Maybe last season’s numbers were the anomaly, or maybe the struggles of Jamal Murray’s shot and the lack of Danilo Gallinari (now with the Clippers) is hurting their spacing. The Nuggets are home for six in a row and they need to rack up some wins.

 
Lakers small icon 23. Lakers (3-4 LW 24). There’s a lot to like with Lonzo Ball, but when a rookie leads your offense it’s going to struggle — the Lakers are 28th in the league in offensive rating so far this young season, behind even the Suns. I expect that to improve some, but whether they can keep up their 9th-ranked defense to start the season is the more interesting question (don’t bet on it, but they are improved on that end).

 
Heat small icon 24. Heat (2-4, LW 15). Miami really misses Hassan Whiteside, both on the glass (where they are getting pushed around), and to get some putbacks and easy buckets that they are not getting now. This has been a very inconsistent team — not just game-to-game, but also within games — and that makes them hard to get a handle on early. They head out Friday on a six-game road trip.

 
Suns small icon 25. Suns (3-4, LW 30). The Suns have looked better their last four games, winning three, and there are a couple reasons for that. First, they sent Eric Bledsoe home and are playing Mike James and Tyler Ulis at the point — those guys aren’t nearly as talented but at least they care and are trying on defense. Second, Jay Triano has made other moves — starting Marquese Chriss — that make this team a little better. Not good, but not the train wreck they were.

 
Nets small icon 26. Nets (3-5, LW 19). They would be higher on this list if they could hold a lead — three of their losses came when blowing a 10-point lead (or more) in the game. That includes handing the cross-town Knicks their first win of the season. The Nets remain a really good shooting team, but they do a lot more damage in the first quarter than they do the rest of the game.

 
Kings small icon 27. Kings (1-6, LW 25). Last Sunday the Kings sat both George Hill and Zach Randolph against the Wizards, going young for a day, and it was a reminder of how far this team has to go. The bright spot has been De’Aaron Fox, who has shown impressive flashes — he’s shooting 42.9 percent from three, and is quick enough to to the rim where he is shooting an impressive 68.8 percent.

 
Mavericks small icon 28. Mavericks (1-7 LW 27). Dallas’ one win for the season surprisingly came against a hot Memphis team. Shooting has been a problem: Dirk Nowitzki is shooting 40.5%, Harrison Barnes 37.9%, and Devin Harris 35.7%. The other problem for Dallas is now the schedule gets tougher — four of their next six are on the road and the level of competition steps up with the Clippers, Timberwolves, Wizards, Cavaliers, and Thunder coming up.

 
Hawks small icon 29. Hawks (1-6, LW 26). They have lost six in a row, and while injuries were part of that (Dennis Schroder missed time) this is an average defensive team so far with a bottom-five offense. With Schroder and Kent Bazemore as the primary offensive options, I’m not sure efficiency is in the cards. It could be a long season.

 
Bulls small icon 30. Bulls (1-4 LW 29). They have the worst offense in the NBA this season, and there are not a lot of prospects of it getting better. If you want a silver lining, Lauri Markkanen has played fairly well, the rookie is averaging 15.6 points per game and is showing 41.7 percent from three. Kris Dunn is healthy and has returned to the lineup, he will get a chance to prove his struggles in Minnesota last season were a fluke.

Report: Clippers-DeAndre Jordan extension talks have ‘stalled’

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Clippers president Lawrence Frank called DeAndre Jordan a “Clipper for life.”

The organization can put its money where its mouth is by extending Jordan’s contract. He’s eligible for an extension that could start next season at up to $27,170,820 and be worth up to $121,725,274 over four years.

Zach Lowe of ESPN:

He has discussed an extension, but he would earn less going that route; talks have stalled. “If they want me, yeah, I’d love to be here,” Jordan says. “But I don’t have an extension, do I? So we’ll see.” (Jordan is also negotiating without an agent. He parted ways with Dan Fegan, his old agent, after the Dallas hostage situation. “I haven’t had the best experiences with agents,” Jordan says.)

The Clippers know the math. Perhaps they are angling to squeeze Jordan in a tight free agency market. Whether they can build a contender around Griffin and Jordan will depend in part on “what the number is” on Jordan’s salary, Rivers admits. “We want DJ back,” Rivers says. “We think we can win a title building around him and Blake. You also need room in the budget for other people.”

It’s not clear where the breakdown is. Jordan could opt out next summer, when max starting salary projects to be $35 million, which would carry a five-year max of $205 million if he re-signs or a four-year max of $152 million if he signs elsewhere. Maybe he doesn’t want to lock into a smaller extension now.

The Clippers should also be wary of pledging big money to Jordan into his 30s. It’s a tight market, especially for centers. The Clippers are still establishing their identity around Blake Griffin after Chris Paul‘s departure. The early returns certainly make Jordan look like a positive part of this retooling, but it’s early. Committing to him would also limit L.A.’s upside to lure another star.

Frank made a strong statement about Jordan’s status before the season, but now, it doesn’t look quite as likely Jordan stays with the Clippers for the rest of his career.

Blake Griffin says Jerry West major reason he re-signed with Clippers

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Chris Paul forced his way out of Los Angeles on the eve of free agency, pushing the Clippers into a trade with the Rockets so CP3 could pair with James Harden. The next question was would Blake Griffin follow Paul out of town.

Instead, it took him just a few hours to re-sign with the Clippers (a five-year, $173 million max deal he couldn’t have gotten anywhere else).

Why did he stay? He said the addition of Jerry West to the Clipper front office swayed him, speaking to Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports.

“Jerry had a major voice to me, and he’s had an influence in coming and working on the culture here,” Griffin told The Vertical. “This franchise had unfinished business, and I had unfinished business here. We had unfinished business together and I valued that. We laid it out there that no matter what was going on around us, both sides hadn’t accomplished what we set out for.

“I couldn’t abandon this now.”

Let’s be clear, there are 173 million reasons that Griffin took a serious look at the Clippers, plus he eyeing a career in the film and entertainment industry after his playing days, and he already has that going in Los Angeles. There were a lot of factors in his decision.

Jerry West and his influence on the organization is clearly one of them. The Clippers signed him away from the Warriors after the season.

Owner Steve Ballmer realized it was time to move on from the coach/GM experiment in Los Angeles (a fad that we could see die out in other franchises sooner rather than later), and Lawrence Frank at the helm has proven a steady hand. West brings a lifetime of good decisions as a GM — building the Showtime Lakers, pushing to get Kobe Bryant in the draft, through helping convince the Warriors not to trade Klay Thompson for Kevin Love — and the Clippers need that kind of mojo going forward. West isn’t perfect, but he brings a vision to teams that matters.

That vision helped Los Angeles to a good offseason.

The Clippers still have a great front line with Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, Danilo Gallinari was a smart signing at the three, and they did well getting both veterans (Patrick Beverley, Lou Williams) and young players such as Sam Dekker in the CP3 trade. The roster is shaken up but it works, especially with the underrated passing and playmaking of Griffin driving the bus. Los Angeles is moving the ball, spacing the floor, playing faster, and defending much better, which has them off to a 4-0 start (including Griffin hitting the game-winner in Portland). The Clippers have a long way to go to compete with the best teams in the NBA over the course of a full season in playoffs, but if they can stay healthy (a concern with this roster) they are farther along than most thought.

And Griffin is happy right where he is. Which is what should drive his decision.

Three Things to Know: DeMarcus Cousins drops 41, gets his revenge on Kings

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) DeMarcus Cousins returns to Sacramento, drops 41,gets his revenge. DeMarcus Cousins may wonder why he was so loyal to Sacramento , but he was reminded exactly why Thursday night — Kings’ fans. When Cousins was introduced pregame he got an ovation so loud it drowned out the boos from some of the fans (those boos were louder as he started to score more through the game). He was loved in Sacramento. And most fans understand you can’t blame a guy who had six coaches in seven years — plus two owners and three GMs — for being frustrated about the direction of the team.

The problems with Cousins in Sacramento were a two-way street, he was a headache to management and coaches as well, but on Thursday night in his homecoming Cousins reminded them why they worked so hard to keep him — he is a force of nature. Cousins had 41 points on just 25 shots, plus pulled down 23 boards in the game, and 14 of those points were in the fourth quarter when the Pelicans came back to win 114-106. Cousins got his revenge.

The Kings were hot early, racing out to a 25-6 lead over the Anthony Davis-less Pelicans. This was a game where the Kings’ future was on display — De’Aaron Fox had 14 points and 5 assists off the bench (it’s time to start him in a three-guard lineup), Buddy Hield had 12 as did Willie Cauley-Stein, and Skal Labissiere added 11. The Kings spread the scoring around with seven guys in double figures, and the team put up 70 points in the first half.

However, young teams are inconsistent ones and that big Sacramento lead faded in the third quarter, as the Kings shot 32 percent for the quarter. Jrue Holiday’s play also picked up — the Pelican point guard had 11 of his 20 points in the quarter, plus he dished out 7 assists on the night. Jameer Nelson gave the Pelicans some solid minutes as well in reserve and had 19 points.

In the end, the team with the dominant player won (as often happens in basketball). Cousins has averaged 33 points and 14.2 rebounds a game this season, looking a little lighter and more mobile than in previous years. He reminded Kings fans what they were missing, while those same fans saw their young team show both promise and remind them there is a long way to go this season.

2) Best ending of the season: Blake Griffin drains three at buzzer to beat Portland. Sorry Trail Blazers fans because I know this one stings, but this was the most dramatic ending to a game we have seen this season.

Portland had taken a one-point lead on a sweet C.J. McCollum floater with 43 seconds left. The Clippers came down, then after a missed three and offensive board, they had a possession where DeAndre Jordan got the ball with room to drive the paint from the mid-post, but instead he kicked it out to an open Danilo Gallinari at the top of the arc who decided not to shoot and dished it to Austin Rivers on the left wing — and if you give Rivers a chance to shoot he takes it. Rivers drove, earned a blocking call in the paint, and got his shot blocked and a finger gruesomely dislocated in the process. But while the cameras focused on his pain, the referees reviewed the blocking call they had made against Damian Lillard on the play and reversed it — charging on Rivers.

Portland inbounded the ball and McCollum was quickly fouled, but he only made one of two free throws, making it a two-point game and opening the door for this to happen.

 

Game. Set. Match.

Griffin is shooting 43 percent from three this season, and he has been fantastic.

The Clippers are 4-0 on the young season with wins over Utah and Portland. It’s a long season and they have to stay healthy, but this is a pretty good team Doc Rivers is coaching in Los Angeles.

3) Giannis Antetokounmpo puts up numbers but Celtics walk away with win. This is how hot Giannis Antetokounmpo has been the first week of the season — Boston can say they (mostly Al Horford) did a good job holding him to 28 points and 10 rebounds. Antetokounmpo was 10-of-21 shooting, and he had 13 shots in the paint to nine outside of it (before this game 81 percent of his shots had come in the paint).

It was fun to see the Bucks return to the MECCA for one game, although this game probably reminded older Bucks fans of a lot of games in that arena — a loss. There was the championship year in that building back in 1971, but there were some rough years that followed as well.

While Kyrie Irving had 16 of his 24 points in the first half, then made some key plays down the stretch, the Celtics really won this game with a 10-0 run by their bench early in the fourth that gave them some cushion. Horford, in addition to a strong defensive night, led the Celtics with 27 points. The Celtics were the more aggressive team, they got to the free throw line eight more times than the Bucks, and that got them the 96-89 win. That’s three straight wins for Boston, if you’re tracking these things.

NBA Three Things to Know: Blake Griffin can still dunk, Clippers are legit

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Clippers ace first real test, silence Jazz. And if you think Blake Griffin doesn’t dunk anymore… The Clippers came into Tuesday night 2-0, and we all shrugged because they had beaten the Lakers and the Suns. It was little more than extended training camp. Blake Griffin had looked like a maestro running the Clipper offense, Patrick Beverley talked a lot, but how do we judge that against two of the worst defensive teams in the league?

Tuesday night the Clippers owned a good Jazz team in the second half, and Griffin dropped 22 points with nine rebounds and 6 assists — given their first test the Clippers aced it. Griffin set the tone in the first quarter with a throwback dunk over the best defensive big man in the game, Rudy Gobert. Tell me again how Griffin doesn’t dunk anymore.

Griffin has always been an underrated passer, but he has added a legit three-point shot to his arsenal this season, shooting 44 percent from beyond the arc so far. More importantly, he is now their best playmaker and they need him for Doc Rivers pass-and-cut offense to be effective — against Utah it was clear how much the Clippers missed Milos Teodosic to create with the second unit (Lou Williams was off and just 3-of-10 shooting, he has to lead that second unit now). Griffin has been at his peak to start the season, and he’s getting some help — DeAndre Jordan had 11 points and 18 rebounds outplaying Gobert, Patrick Beverley had 19 points and was 4-of-7 from three, and Austin Rivers added 16 against Utah.

Three games in, the Clippers also have the best defense in the NBA, allowing just 86.1 points per 100 possessions. We’re going to take a wait-and-see on how good the defense really is — the Lakers, Suns, and Jazz are not exactly offensive powerhouses — but it’s a promising start.

From the opening of training camp the question with the Clippers was not “do they have talent?” because they had plenty, the real question was “can they keep that talent on the court?” There are a lot of guys with long injury histories on this team, starting with Griffin. When healthy, however, this is a good Clippers team. Very good.

2) Anthony Davis gives everyone a scare, but MRI is clean and he is day-to-day.
That sound you hear is GM Dell Demps, coach Alvin Gentry, and the entire city of New Orleans exhaling.

Just five minutes into Tuesday night’s game against Portland, Anthony Davis left it with a sore knee. He had banged it in knee-to-knee contact with Damian Lillard, then we saw it buckle a little in a position battle with Maurice Harkless, and we were worried — Davis has been his usual, brilliant self to start the season and the basketball gods have already robbed us of enough talent to start the season. They can’t have Davis, too.

They won’t. An MRI came back negative and Davis is considered day-to-day. Without him on the court DeMarcus Cousins took over scoring 39 points and grabbing 13 boards, and keeping it close. However, Portland closed the game on a 9-0 run, and with Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum combining for 24 points in the fourth quarter it was too much for New Orleans to match. Portland got the 103-93 win, and the Pelicans fall to 1-3 to start the season (the Blazers are 3-1).

3) LeBron James takes over as Cavaliers point guard, he can play that, too. Isaiah Thomas will not step on the court in a Cavaliers uniform until 2018. Derrick Rose is out with a tweaked ankle. That left Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue with a choice: Start Jose Calderon or LeBron James at the point?

Is that even a question? Actually, it was when Lue started Calderon against Orlando, and Cleveland lost. Lesson learned. LeBron played the point Tuesday and was his MVP-level self: 34 points on 20 shots, 4-of-6 from three, and he racked up 13 assists.

Kevin Love had 10 of his 20 points on the night in the fourth quarter, and the Cavaliers moved past a game Bulls team for the 119-112 win.

This was also the game where J.R. Smith moved back into the starting lineup, but he stumbled shooting 1-of-8 from the floor in this one (he had missed shootaround with a sore back). Dwyane Wade was 5-of-7 off the bench and boosted a Cavs bench that could use it, scoring 11 points. Tristan Thompson also slid into the starting lineup for the Cavaliers in this one, but that was more about Robin Lopez being at center for Chicago and Lue wanting to match up. The Cavaliers are versatile and veteran enough to make all these changes and just keep on winning.

It also helps to have LeBron James.