Associated Press

Three Things to Know: DeMarcus Cousins drops 41, gets his revenge on Kings

2 Comments

Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) DeMarcus Cousins returns to Sacramento, drops 41,gets his revenge. DeMarcus Cousins may wonder why he was so loyal to Sacramento , but he was reminded exactly why Thursday night — Kings’ fans. When Cousins was introduced pregame he got an ovation so loud it drowned out the boos from some of the fans (those boos were louder as he started to score more through the game). He was loved in Sacramento. And most fans understand you can’t blame a guy who had six coaches in seven years — plus two owners and three GMs — for being frustrated about the direction of the team.

The problems with Cousins in Sacramento were a two-way street, he was a headache to management and coaches as well, but on Thursday night in his homecoming Cousins reminded them why they worked so hard to keep him — he is a force of nature. Cousins had 41 points on just 25 shots, plus pulled down 23 boards in the game, and 14 of those points were in the fourth quarter when the Pelicans came back to win 114-106. Cousins got his revenge.

The Kings were hot early, racing out to a 25-6 lead over the Anthony Davis-less Pelicans. This was a game where the Kings’ future was on display — De’Aaron Fox had 14 points and 5 assists off the bench (it’s time to start him in a three-guard lineup), Buddy Hield had 12 as did Willie Cauley-Stein, and Skal Labissiere added 11. The Kings spread the scoring around with seven guys in double figures, and the team put up 70 points in the first half.

However, young teams are inconsistent ones and that big Sacramento lead faded in the third quarter, as the Kings shot 32 percent for the quarter. Jrue Holiday’s play also picked up — the Pelican point guard had 11 of his 20 points in the quarter, plus he dished out 7 assists on the night. Jameer Nelson gave the Pelicans some solid minutes as well in reserve and had 19 points.

In the end, the team with the dominant player won (as often happens in basketball). Cousins has averaged 33 points and 14.2 rebounds a game this season, looking a little lighter and more mobile than in previous years. He reminded Kings fans what they were missing, while those same fans saw their young team show both promise and remind them there is a long way to go this season.

2) Best ending of the season: Blake Griffin drains three at buzzer to beat Portland. Sorry Trail Blazers fans because I know this one stings, but this was the most dramatic ending to a game we have seen this season.

Portland had taken a one-point lead on a sweet C.J. McCollum floater with 43 seconds left. The Clippers came down, then after a missed three and offensive board, they had a possession where DeAndre Jordan got the ball with room to drive the paint from the mid-post, but instead he kicked it out to an open Danilo Gallinari at the top of the arc who decided not to shoot and dished it to Austin Rivers on the left wing — and if you give Rivers a chance to shoot he takes it. Rivers drove, earned a blocking call in the paint, and got his shot blocked and a finger gruesomely dislocated in the process. But while the cameras focused on his pain, the referees reviewed the blocking call they had made against Damian Lillard on the play and reversed it — charging on Rivers.

Portland inbounded the ball and McCollum was quickly fouled, but he only made one of two free throws, making it a two-point game and opening the door for this to happen.

 

Game. Set. Match.

Griffin is shooting 43 percent from three this season, and he has been fantastic.

The Clippers are 4-0 on the young season with wins over Utah and Portland. It’s a long season and they have to stay healthy, but this is a pretty good team Doc Rivers is coaching in Los Angeles.

3) Giannis Antetokounmpo puts up numbers but Celtics walk away with win. This is how hot Giannis Antetokounmpo has been the first week of the season — Boston can say they (mostly Al Horford) did a good job holding him to 28 points and 10 rebounds. Antetokounmpo was 10-of-21 shooting, and he had 13 shots in the paint to nine outside of it (before this game 81 percent of his shots had come in the paint).

It was fun to see the Bucks return to the MECCA for one game, although this game probably reminded older Bucks fans of a lot of games in that arena — a loss. There was the championship year in that building back in 1971, but there were some rough years that followed as well.

While Kyrie Irving had 16 of his 24 points in the first half, then made some key plays down the stretch, the Celtics really won this game with a 10-0 run by their bench early in the fourth that gave them some cushion. Horford, in addition to a strong defensive night, led the Celtics with 27 points. The Celtics were the more aggressive team, they got to the free throw line eight more times than the Bucks, and that got them the 96-89 win. That’s three straight wins for Boston, if you’re tracking these things.

Report: Seattle hosting Kings-Warriors preseason game

Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Kevin Durant spent his rookie season in Seattle, before the SuperSonics moved to Oklahoma City and became the Thunder. He has said Seattle fans deserved to see him grow up in the NBA after supporting his promising start.

They’ll get their chance.

Ailene Voisin of The Sacramento Bee:

The Kings and Golden State Warriors have scheduled a preseason game next season in Seattle, according to multiple league sources.

The Oct. 6 meeting between Northern California teams will be the first NBA game in the Key Arena since the Sonics moved to Oklahoma City after the 2007-08 season and became the Thunder.

This game will be loaded with storylines. Not only Durant, but the Kings considered moving to Seattle a few years ago. And of course, the return of NBA basketball to Seattle.

At some point, Seattle will get its own team again. For now, this preseason game creates intrigue there.

Report: Kawhi Leonard cleared medically, seeking second opinion

Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
2 Comments

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said he’d be surprised if Kawhi Leonard played again this season, a stark reversal from just a month ago. Back then, even while announcing Leonard was out indefinitely with a quad injury, the San Antonio coach said Leonard wouldn’t miss the rest of the season.

What’s going on?

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

After spending 10 days before the All-Star break in New York consulting with a specialist to gather a second opinion on his right quad injury, All-NBA forward Kawhi Leonard bears the burden of determining when he’s prepared to play again, sources told ESPN.

Leonard has been medically cleared to return from the right quad tendinopathy injury, but since shutting down a nine-game return to the Spurs that ended Jan. 13, he has elected against returning to the active roster, sources said.

The uncertainty surrounding this season — and Leonard’s future which could include free agency in the summer of 2019 — has inspired a palpable stress around the organization, league sources said.

At first glance, this sounds like Derrick Rose five years ago. Even after he was cleared to play following a torn ACL, the then-Bulls star remained mysterious about when he’d suit up. His confidence in his physical abilities seemed to be a major issue, and he was never the same player since (suffering more leg injuries).

But the Spurs famously favor resting players to preserve long-term health. They seem unlikely to rush back Leonard. They might even sit players who want to play more often. And Leonard isn’t Rose.

Still, it’s clear something is amiss in San Antonio. Maybe not amiss enough to end Leonard’s tenure there, but the longer this lingers, the more time for tension to percolate.

Report: Dennis Smith Jr. planned to have J. Cole dunk in dunk-contest routine

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Mavericks rookie Dennis Smith Jr. seemed pretty steamed about getting eliminated in the first round of the dunk contest:

The dunk-contest scoring system – five judges ranking dunks on a scale of 6-10 – is plenty flawed. There should have been a larger difference between the Smith and Victor Oladipo dunks the Dallas point guard mentioned. But Oladipo didn’t advance, either. Personally, I thought the right two players – eventual-winner Donovan Mitchell and runner-up Larry Nance Jr. – advanced.

Maybe Smith was more upset about the missed opportunity – dunks (plural!) involving rapper J. Cole.

Amin El-Hassan of ESPN on Black Opinions Matter:

If Dennis had made it to the finals, Cole was going to throw him the alley-oop. But then the plan was, he was going to throw him the oop, Dennis would dunk it, and then Cole would catch the ball, and then he’d dunk it too. That was going to be the ill, craziest dunk-contest use of a prop or a person ever. But we never got to saw it, because they were holding out until the final round. They didn’t want to bring it out in the first round.

This certainly would have been unprecedented and cool. But unless Smith had something amazing planned for the alley-oop, the best element would have been Cole dunking. That would have upstaged Smith, who’s presumably the one being judged.

For what it’s worth, Cole can dunk. We’ve seen it in the celebrity game:

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich says he’d be surprised if Kawhi Leonard returns this season

Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
3 Comments

When announcing last month Kawhi Leonard was out indefinitely due to a lingering quad injury, Spurs coach Gregg Popovich dismissed the idea his star forward would miss the rest of the season:

Apparently, Popovich’s expectation has changed.

Michael C. Wright of ESPN:

The Spurs (35-24) are third in the West despite Leonard playing just nine games. Popovich has done a great job (maybe Coach of the Year-worthy). LaMarcus Aldridge is having a bounce-back season in a leading role. Pau Gasol leads a supporting cast of players good in their roles.

But San Antonio’s ceiling is so much lower without Leonard.

He’s an elite defender who shuts down opposing scorers on the perimeter and can comfortably switch inside. He can isolate offensively to score efficiently, and he spaces the floor off the ball with strong 3-point shooting. Those are all skills that translate to the playoffs.

Without him, the Spurs rely too heavily on older, slower defenders. That’s ripe to be exploited in the postseason.

Teams might even jockey to match up with San Antonio – the most vulnerable-appearing Western Conference team in line to get home-court advantage in the first round.

Of course, this doesn’t eliminate the possibility of Leonard returning. Popovich could just be trying to shut down speculation. He clearly doesn’t like discussing this issue.

But the Spurs are the most cautious team on injuries. If Leonard risks further injury, they’ll keep him sidelined.

This injury has already caused tension. This won’t help.