Getty Images

Top 10 free agents still on the market

Leave a comment

Most NBA teams’ rosters are set, maybe save for one minimum salary spot usually reserved for a young player the team is trying to develop. The big names, and even the medium and plenty of small names, are off the board.

However, in a tight market, there are still some recognizable names out there, unsigned veterans who could help teams looking to fill a particular role — wing defenders, big men, even some point guard help. They are available for a reason, but they can help a team.

Here is my Top 10 list of remaining free agents. The list is not complete, for example, Andrew Bogut doesn’t make my cut but if healthy he could help the right team, the same with David Lee. Also, not on this list are any restricted free agents such as JaMychal Green, Nikola Mirotic, or Mason Plumlee (in theory they are available, in practice no team has or would spend the cap money on an offer the team with their rights would not match).

1. Shabazz Muhammad. He’s a wing who gave Minnesota almost 20 minutes a night and 9.9 points a game last season, but lost out in the numbers game as that roster shifted (with Jimmy Butler coming in to take a lot of minutes at his spot). Muhammad is a power player who likes to post up, but he doesn’t space the floor well — almost 60 percent of his shots last season came within 10 feet of the basket, and he shot 33 percent on threes. He’s not a great defender and not focused on that end. The Lakers reportedly are interested, and he’s still talking to Minnesota.

2. Tony Allen. The heart of “grit n’ grind” in Memphis is still on the outside looking in as that team revamps a little. He still is a quality wing defender, although he has started to slow at age 35, and he does not bring much offense to the table. Memphis may well re-sign him after they figure out the JaMychal Green situation, but Allen thought he would get more than the minimum and that seems off the table now anywhere.

3. Dante Cunningham. I could see him as a glue guy who could space the floor and hit threes on the right team — he shot 39.2 percent on his 2.7 threes a game last season, that percentage may regress a little, but he can hit that shot and blend in on units. He’s not a bad defender on the wing, and can play the small ball four. The Bucks, Timberwolves, and Pelicans all have been mentioned as having interest in him.

4. Deron Williams. The former All-Star point guard has lost a couple of steps, and that was exposed in the playoffs with the Cavaliers last season (after he was bought out by the Mavericks). Cleveland hoped he could stabilize their second unit, but that didn’t work out like they expected. He can still dish the ball, hit threes, and be a floor general against regular season second units, and there are teams that could use that. As the stakes go up in the playoffs, his role has to be limited.

5. Thomas Robinson. He’s played for six NBA teams in five seasons, and he brings energy and effort. He is strong on the boards plus was the most efficient scorer he has ever been with the Lakers last season. However, while he can get buckets inside 10 feet but does not space the floor. He was not getting court time on a young team higher on other forwards on their roster in Los Angeles, but they have worked him out again recently.

6. Tyler Zeller. He moves well for a big man, but his inefficiency and limits on the offensive end had him struggling to get minutes on a Celtics team that needed help up front last season. He has an okay midrange game but needs to get easy buckets at the rim again. He struggles defensively in space. However, if he plays to his strengths he could be a decent backup big.

7. Gerald Green. He played decently in inconsistent minutes last season in Boston, but was left in the cold as the Celtics revamped their roster this summer. He is respectable from three (35.1 percent last season) and can play decent defense, plus is a joking veteran presence in the locker room. Oh, and he likes hot chocolate.

8. Matt Barnes. The Warriors brought in Barnes (after a buyout in Sacramento) last season to provide some stability after Kevin Durant‘s knee injury, and he did that for 20+ games. He plays hard, defends, and shot 33 percent from three. In a limited wing or small-ball four off the bench role, he can give a team solid minutes. How much does he have in the tank at age 37?

9. Trey Burke. He’s a score-first point guard who hasn’t made great decisions on when to shoot and when to set up teammates. He didn’t finish well around the rim last season, but on the nights he shot well he put up points (he had two 27 point games in Washington last season). However, on nights he didn’t he hurt the team, and there were more of those nights. Burke struggles to defend at an NBA level. The Wizards brought in Brandon Jennings last season as they decided Utah was right in cutting Burke out. The Knicks and Timberwolves have taken a look at Burke.

10. Anthony Morrow. If he can find his stroke again and get back to being a dangerous spot-up three point shooter he can help teams — he’s a career 41.7 percent shooter from three but hit just 30.8 percent last season. He was a throw-in on the Taj GibsonDoug McDermott trade and went from OKC to Chicago, but never found a rhythm there. He’s not much of a defender, he has to knock down threes to help a team.

Pelicans rookie Frank Jackson has another surgery, will miss entire season now

Getty Images
Leave a comment

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The New Orleans Pelicans say rookie guard Frank Jackson won’t make his NBA debut this season after having follow-up surgery to remove residual scar tissue from earlier right foot operations.

The Pelicans say Jackson also received an injection in his foot.

The club says a specialist in New York handled Jackson’s latest procedure.

The Pelicans acquired the 6-foot-4 Jackson through a draft-night trade with the Charlotte Hornets, who selected the former Duke player with the first pick of the second round last summer.

Following the draft, the Pelicans signed Jackson to a three-year contract at the NBA minimum with two years guaranteed, but Jackson needed a second foot surgery last summer to address a setback following his initial surgery last May.

Jackson spent one season at Duke, averaging 10.9 points.


Giannis Antetokounmpo turns bad pass into ridiculous alley-oop (VIDEO)

Leave a comment

That is just not fair.

Milwaukee’s Eric Bledsoe threw an alley-oop pass to Giannis Antetokounmpo that was off the mark — high and behind him — but it just doesn’t matter. The Greek Freak gets up and throws it down.

It’s early, but it’s going to be hard to beat that one for dunk of the night.

League’s Last Two Minute Report backs referees (mostly) in Raptors/Thunder game

Associated Press
1 Comment

Anyone who watched the Thunder’s win over the Raptors Sunday afternoon in Toronto — especially the final few minutes — thought it was not referee Marc Davis and crew’s finest hour. There were missed calls and three-straight ejections of Raptors players, which all seemed rather hair-trigger (especially coach Dwane Casey, who was tossed for something a fan behind him said).

The NBA’s Last Two Minute report doesn’t see it that way — it says the referees nailed it.

According to the report, there was only one missed call in the final two minutes: Carmelo Anthony held Pascal Siakam as a pass came to him with 11.7 seconds left, and that should have been called.

What about the play that set DeMar DeRozan off and ultimately got him ejected, the drive to the basket with 33 seconds left (and the Raptors down two) where DeRozan thought Corey Brewer fouled him? The report said that was a good no call:

DeRozan (TOR) starts his drive and Brewer (OKC) moves laterally in his path and there is contact. The contact is incidental as both players attempt to perform normal basketball moves….

RHH shows Brewer (OKC) make contact with the ball and the part of DeRozan’s (TOR) hand that is on the ball. The hand is considered “part of the ball” when it is in contact with the ball and therefore, contact on that part of the hand by a defender while it is in contact with the ball is not illegal.

(I didn’t see it that way, I think the contact was more than incidental, and to me looking at the replay Brewer catches some wrist and impedes the shot in a way that was not legal. Just my two cents.)

The report does not cover the ejections, which are reviewed by league operations but not part of this report.

Three thoughts out of all this:

1) Raptors fans/management/players have every right to feel the calls went against them in this game. As for calls always going against them — as DeRozan complained about after the game — 29 other teams and fan bases are convinced the officials have it out for them, too. I never bought that.

2) The Raptors didn’t lose this game solely because of the officiating. Russell Westbrook was clutch down the stretch, the Thunder were part of it, and the Raptors had other issues, too (Serge Ibaka had a rough game, for example).

3) This loss also does not say a thing about the Raptors in the postseason (even if they went a little too much isolation at the end) — this was their third game in four days, they looked tired and flat at the end. That will not be the case in the playoffs.

Rumor: Injured Jimmy Butler wore his jersey under shirt and jacket on Timberwolves bench

AP Photo/Andy Clayton-King

Jimmy Butler‘s competitive fire burns hot.

How hot?

Butler is chomping at the bit to return from his knee injury. He sat on the Timberwolves’ bench during their loss to the Rockets last night wearing what appeared to be typical attire for a sidelined player. But dig deeper, and…

Marc Stein of The New York Times:

This story is too good to check out.