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LeBron James undercurrent of Celtics introducing Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward


A restricted free agent in 2014, Gordon Hayward visited Cleveland. Kyrie Irving – who had just signed a contract extension with the Cavaliers – recruited him.

“Then LeBron came, and that kind of squashed that whole thing,” Hayward said today at the Celtics’ introductory press conference for their newest stars.

That was first mention of the elephant in the room: LeBron James, who seemingly played a large role in Irving requesting a trade from the Cavs before that 2014 extension completed.

Irving just laughed and held up his hands as Hayward spoke of LeBron, whom Irving had sidestepped in questions about why he wanted to leave Cleveland and what Boston needed to do to overtake the Cavaliers in the East. It wasn’t until the final question that Irving finally addressed LeBron.

“No, I haven’t spoken to him,” Irving said. “And my intent, like I said, was for my best intentions. And to look back at the amount of ground we covered in the last three-year span – or even before that, because we had a prior relationship – and to really realize how special that was and how much growth happened in that amount of time, I’d be sitting up here and telling you guys a lie if I didn’t tell you I learned so much from that guy. The perfection of the craft comes in a variety of forms. And you watch, and you watch, and you ask a lot of the great players, “What does it take to be great?” And I’ve had the unique opportunity to play with one of the greats, and it was awesome. At times, it was all over, just like it is in any other team. And when you look back and you’re eternally grateful for the moments that you’ve had and you’ve shared, you’re able to put peace with that journey and start anew. And this was a very, very challenging decision at first. But after a while, when you understand, and you have that confidence yourself to understand the magnitude of what you actually can accomplish and potentially can do with other great people. And now that I’m sitting here, it just echoes in terms of me just being very appreciative of, not only the Cleveland fans, all of Ohio, but as well as Bron incorporating me into that special team that we had in Cleveland. Because three Finals in a row, all the shared memories, all the individuals, with T-Top, Swish – I could go down the line with the guys that I played with in Cleveland. But they all know how I feel about them individually, as well the amount of love that we have for one another. The brotherhood exists, even without all this, and it will continue. So, that’s exactly where it is. And I’m very appreciative of it.”

The rest of the press conference was more of the same – Irving bloviating and Hayward, who lasted fewer than two months as Boston’s splashiest new addition, an afterthought.

Even in an offseason Celtics press conference he obviously didn’t attend, LeBron was the subtext that drove interest. If you want to read into them, there were a few times prior to his final answer that Irving addressed LeBron:

  • “I just knew that I wasn’t going to come up here to specifically point at individuals, specifically point at what issues here, whatever. Because that’s not important to me. At all.”
  • “Is there ever such thing as one person carrying a whole team? I don’t think so.”
  • “There is no such thing as putting the team on your shoulders.”

Irving kept attempting to steer the conversation back to his talking points – his commitment to teamwork and affinity for Boston, including Brad Stevens. The point guard also praised Hayward, repeatedly calling him “a bad dude.”

“He’s been working with a common guy between us, which is pretty awesome in L.A.,” Irving said.

Everyone wanted to hear more about LeBron-Irving, and those questions won’t stop – especially if the Celtics and Cavaliers continue their expected course toward an Eastern Conference finals rematch.

But at least Irving knew, in Boston, it was probably better for him not to talk more about that “common guy between us.”

Utah’s Donovan Mitchell with shot of night to force OT with Spurs


One of the factors to consider in the Rookie of the Year race: clutch plays.

Down three with less than 10 seconds to go Friday night, the Utah Jazz put the ball in the hands of their rookie playmaker Donovan Mitchell — and he made the play, draining a three to force overtime. It’s an impressive play.

In the clutch this season (last five minutes of a game, within five points), Mitchell has averaged 3.2 shots per contest (by far the most of any rookie) and has a true shooting percentage of 51 percent. Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons, the other front-runner in the ROY race, averages less than a shot per game in those clutch situations (0.8) and has a true shooting percentage of 66.7 percent.

Mitchell made the big shot, but the Spurs made plenty too, had 45 points on the night from LaMarcus Aldridge, and got the win.


PBT Extra: Who is coming out of the Eastern Conference?

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The Toronto Raptors will finish with the No. 1 seed and all the best metrics in the East, but they have a history of playoff flameouts. The Boston Celtics’ have been hit hard by injuries. And the Cleveland Cavaliers have LeBron James but also a dreadful defense, this is the most vulnerable a LeBron led team has been since he bolted Cleveland seven years ago.

So what team is coming out of the East?

We get into that in this latest PBT Extra. A poll on Twitter found most of you think the Cavaliers, but personally, I think the Raptors — who have been better defensively all season than the Cavs — may finally have their year.

LaMarcus Aldridge drops career-high 45 points, Spurs beat Jazz in OT

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SAN ANTONIO (AP) — LaMarcus Aldridge had a career-high 45 points, helping San Antonio overcome Donovan Mitchell‘s 35-point performance for Utah in the Spurs’ 124-120 overtime victory over the Jazz on Friday night.

The Spurs won their sixth straight and beat the Jazz for the first time in four meetings this season.

Utah’s 12-game road winning streak came to an end, but only after Mitchell had 14 points in the fourth quarter, including three 3-pointers in the final two minutes to force overtime.

San Antonio remained sixth in the Western Conference with the same record as fifth-place New Orleans, a half-game behind Oklahoma City for fourth. Utah remained eighth in the West.

After free throws by Spurs guards Manu Ginobili and Patty Mills and a dunk by Jazz center Rudy Gobert put San Antonio up 114-111, Mitchell drained his third 3-pointer of the fourth with 3.6 seconds remaining to force overtime.

Mills, who finished with 23 points, had six points in overtime as the Spurs capped an undefeated six-game homestand.

Aldridge averaged 32.2 points and 9.0 rebounds during the winning streak, including two double-doubles.

Aldridge scored 28 points in the first half on 12-for-16 shooting, including a 3-pointer.

Utah missed its first six shots and was 4 for 14 as San Antonio grabbed a 19-8 lead midway through the first quarter. Mitchell settled the Jazz, scoring six points to cut the Spurs lead to 29-21 heading into the second quarter.

Mitchell was 14-for-35 shooting while falling six points shy of his season-high.

Derrick Favors added 22 points for Utah and Ricky Rubio had 20.

Ginobili finished with 18 points for the Spurs.


Stephen Curry leaves game with knee injury


In his first night back from an ankle injury that forced him to miss six games, Stephen Curry limped off the court not to return after in third quarter Friday night after JaVale McGee fell into his knee.

He limped to the bench then eventually to the locker room after the injury.

The severity of the injury is not yet known and should become clear on Saturday after an MRI.

Curry scored 29 points and grabbed seven rebounds before being forced to leave the game, and the Warriors held on to win the game.

Obviously, if Curry is out heading into the playoffs, that changes the dynamic in the West, where the Houston Rockets were already right on the heels of the Warriors.