Three things we learned Wednesday: Labor peace comes to NBA. So everyone gets night off.

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It was a big day off the court in the NBA Wednesday, and that’s where we learned the most.

1) There will be peace in our time — NBA owners, players tentatively agree to new Collective Bargaining Agreement. There will be no lockout this time around. With both the owners and players swimming in the flood of cash from the new television deal, nobody wanted to screw up a good thing, so the two sides agreed to a new NBA CBA far earlier than anyone can ever remember. Give some credit to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and National Basketball Players’ Association director Michele Roberts for not letting the old scar tissue of their predecessors impact the new talks. While both the players and owners need to ratify the deal, that is seen as a formality.

This is a seven-year deal, and while we don’t know all the parameters here are the key things we do know.

• This is the big one — the roughly 50/50 split of revenue will remain (the players get between 49-51 percent of “basketball related income” depending on if the league meets revenue goals). This is always the ultimate stumbling block and everything else is secondary. The fact the two sides agreed on this split quickly — in part because the rising tide of the new national television contract has floated all boats — made the rest of this relatively straightforward.

• The college one-and-done rule will remain. For now. Both sides will continue to look at the issue. Nobody likes it much, but the players want the age limit gone, the owners want it bumped up to 20, and neither side apparently was willing to give up enough on other issues to move the needle. It’s a negotiation, if one side really wants the limit moved they are going to have to give something else up.

• We should just call this the Kevin Durant Rule: Teams can now choose a “designated veteran” and offer said veteran a much larger and longer extension (maybe up to six years) than could previously be done. That extension can be a full max deal (35 percent of the cap) even if the team does not have cap space. However, the player must meet certain criteria, for example having made an All-NBA team. This is not like the NFL’s designated player rule where the player is locked in once selected, this is simply a larger incentive for him to stay. The first test cases with this will likely be Paul George and DeMarcus Cousins (the question in both of those is would the player take it or is he willing to make a little less to get out of town).

• The NBA players’ union now will handle negotiations for player-likeness rights (such as those used in video games). This is something the union wanted and was that last-minute snag in negotiations the past couple of weeks. While the players agreed to the 50/50 revenue split, the player likeness licensing is a place the union can make more money, and this is a growing area of revenue.

• The preseason will be shortened by three or four games, allowing the regular season to start a week to 10 days earlier. That additional time will be used to reduce the number of back-to-backs (see item No. 1 above) and nearly eliminate four games in five nights situations.

• Under the old deal, some salary cap exceptions were locked in — for example, the rookie scale pay numbers — and did not change. Now all those exceptions (which also includes the veteran minimum, mid-level exception, and so on) will be tied to the salary cap. As it goes up or down, so will those numbers.

• The scaled salaries for rookies will increase.

• There will be some changes to cap holds that will make it harder to do what Kawhi Leonard and Andre Drummond did with their rookie deals, delaying signing an obvious max extension to allow the team to use that cap space to put a better team around them. In the short term, like this coming July, the cap hold increases could make it difficult for the Warriors to keep Andre Iguodala and other role players around Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant (both of whom are up for massive new paydays).

• The NBA and players’ union will form a committee to study the use of wearable tracking devices — which monitor heart rate, physical fatigue, and much more — during games as well as practices. Teams want this data and cite health concerns — they say they can prevent more injuries if they know a player is more fatigued than he lets on. Players are concerned the data will be used against them in contract negotiations. The sides will try to find a middle ground.

• The NBA will create a fund to help with medical expenses and more for retired players who need it, particularly older ones that have been out of the league for some time.

• NBA teams can have up to three “two-way contracts” that will pay between $50,000 and $75,000. This is something the NBA borrowed from the NHL. These players will have two salaries on the books, their D-League salary and an NBA salary (the minimum, most likely) and will get pro-rated portions of said salaries depending on where they are playing. Teams will be able to move the player between the leagues much more freely.

• There will be changes to the NBA’s domestic violence policy which will clarify the disciplinary procedures in dealing with domestic violence incidents. This will include fines and suspensions, but also will go beyond that and include counseling and other steps to end the cycle.

2) To celebrate the new CBA, the league’s biggest stars were given the night off. Apparently. Wednesday night saw a large number of big stars being rested. And yes, it’s December 14th, we’re not a third of the way into the season yet, and rest is a big talking point. Which is not what Adam Silver wants.

The most discussed rest was Cleveland, where Tyronn Lue sat LeBron James Kevin Love, and Kyrie Irving for the second night of a back-to-back, home-and-home with Memphis (Marc Gasol also sat out that game, due to injury). I get why Lue did this — studies show a player is three times more likely to be injured on the second night of a back-to-back and Lue isn’t playing for the regular season, he’s focused on having all his key guys healthy and rested when the playoffs start. He is looking at the schedule, his big picture goals, and choosing rest. From his perspective, it’s the smart play. But this was Cleveland’s one trip to Memphis this season, there were fans that bought tickets just to see LeBron James, and he did not suit up. The league did not put it’s best product on the floor. That is bad optics for the NBA.

Also on Wednesday night, the Kings’ DeMarcus Cousins and the Spurs’ LaMarcus Aldridge were rested. The new CBA will stretch the season out by a week to 10 days, which will reduce the number of back-to-backs and ideally reduce the number of nights stars are rested. But it will not eliminate the problem, and there is no easy answer here for a league trying to balance player safety and giving the fans what they are paying to see.

3) There were games Wednesday night, too, where John Wall, Hassan Whiteside had huge nights. There were some monster stat lines around the NBA Wednesday night. James Harden racked up a triple-double leading Houston to its eighth straight win. There were some monster stat lines on Wednesday night — Houston’s James Harden had a triple-double of 15 points, 14 assists, and 11 rebounds to lead the Rockets to a 132-98 win over the Kings — that is eight straight wins for the red-hot Rockets, who hit 22 threes in that game.

Then there was John Wall, who had 25 points, 10 assists, and seven steals to get the Wizards a big win over the Hornets.

Also, Hassan Whiteside had 26 points and 22 rebounds leading Miami past Indiana at home.

Report: Suns inform Josh Jackson he will not be part of any Kyrie Irving trade

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The Cleveland Cavaliers want an elite young player back in any trade of Kyrie Irving.

The Phoenix Suns have come up as a trade partner, because of Eric Bledsoe‘s salary, fit with Cleveland if Irving is gone, and the fact he and LeBron James share an agent.

And those suns have an elite young player — Josh Jackson. Taken fourth in the last draft, Jackson showed fantastic athleticism at Summer League, disruptive defense, the ability to make plays around the rim, and while his jumper needs some work there is genuine promise.

Which is why the Suns are not going to include Jackson in any Irving trade.

If the Suns are involved in an Irving trade, it’s likely as part of a three-team deal. Bledsoe would still go out, and Phoenix might be willing to throw in young players such as Marquese Chriss or Dragan Bender, depending on what they got back.

That is the key — the return. Phoenix is rebuilding, Bledsoe is their best trade chip, and if he is going out the door, they are going to want real quality back in return. They are not in this to be a salary dump location, the Suns are going to want young players who can make a difference and picks. Most of the trade scenarios floating around in public forums use Phoenix as the dumping ground in the three- or four-team deals, just know that is not going to happen. The Suns want value for their best trade asset.

Rumor: Are these the new Cleveland Cavaliers Nike uniforms? (PHOTOS)

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Nike will be taking over the NBA uniforms for the 2017-18 season, and now it looks like we have some leaked photos of the Cleveland Cavaliers’ new look.

A photo posted to Twitter on Tuesday showed a mannequin dressed in what appears to be Cleveland’s new wine-colored uniforms.

Nike released some information about their new uniforms recently, including the naming conventions which will be associated with certain editions of team uniforms. Those editions are called The Association, The Icon, The Athlete’s Mindset, and The Community.

The wine edition of the Cleveland uniform would fall under the category of the Icon.

Via Twitter:

Those certainly seem to go along with some of the uniforms that were released during Nikes original release. It’s also hard understand why someone would have a full dress mock up on a mannequin with the Nike logo on it, especially as it is so close to what we have seen from Nike.

Conrad over at Sports Logos has been kind enough to mock up what the Cavaliers uniforms should look like for both the icon and association additions.

Via Sports Logos:

What do you think? I am liking them so far.

Mike Muscala signs 2-year, $10 million deal to remain with Hawks

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ATLANTA (AP) The Atlanta Hawks have re-signed power forward Mike Muscala to a two-year, $10 million deal.

The 6-foot-11 Muscala, who was an unrestricted free agent, could play a bigger role as he returns for his fifth season following the departures of Paul Millsap and Dwight Howard.

Muscala set career highs by averaging 6.2 points and 3.4 rebounds in 70 games, including three starts, last season. He scored in double figures in 20 games and ranked second on the team by making 50.4 percent of his shots from the field.

The team announced the signing Tuesday.

More AP NBA: https://www.apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball

With Allen Crabbe in Brooklyn, what do the Blazers do now?

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Allen Crabbe is now a member of the Brooklyn Nets, this time for good.

The Portland Trail Blazers a traded Crabbe to the team that signed him to a massive four-year, $75 million restricted free agent deal in the summer of 2016. In exchange for Crabbe’s services, the Trail Blazers received Andrew Nicholson, a struggling young big man who the Blazers will reportedly waive using the stretch provision.

The move gets Portland closer to the tax line, shaving off and estimated $43 million off of their luxury tax bill. That’s the primary motivation for this trade of a young, talented 3-point shooter and it sort of begs the question: Just what are the Blazers doing?

To understand the Crabbe trade in context, you have to go back to last summer. Portland was in the hunt for several big name players, including Pau Gasol, Hassan Whiteside, and Chandler Parsons.

Portland, never a big free agent destination, missed out on all three, instead having to panic at the last second. The Nets extended a huge offer sheet to Crabbe on July 7, the same day that Portland agreed to a similarly huge contract with Evan Turner.

With their free agent targets gone, Portland had to do the next best thing: retain talent.

After signing Turner, the Blazers matched Crabbe a few days later. They also signed contracts with Meyers Leonard and Maurice Harkless, and extended C.J. McCollum. Between Turner, Leonard, Harkless, and McCollum the Blazers have committed $62 million to just four players in 2017-18. That’s after wiping Crabbe’s $19 million off the books.

There’s little doubt President of Basketball Operations Neil Olshey has been trying to find trade suitors for Crabbe once he got past the RFA trade moratorium. Likewise, the team seems to have soured on Leonard, coming off of a shoulder injury and who told NBC Sports last season that he didn’t feel fully healthy until the end of winter.

The team was massively disappointing compared to their magical run in 2015-16. Still, there hasn’t been reason to panic in Oregon given that Olshey’s plan with this team since last summer was to swap their assets for a powerful starting lineup.

That plan began to flounder when Crabbe didn’t play up to expectations and when Leonard and Harkless didn’t show continued growth on expectations from seasons past.

Crabbe is an excellent 3-point shooter, but he is also thought of as a potentially great defender. In 2016-17 he looked lost at times on defense, especially when it came to defending top-level players or when he was in weak side situations off the ball. His value plateaued.

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That’s to state nothing of the rest of the team’s performance, specifically by Al-Farouq Aminu. Aminu was vastly important to Portland’s bottom-feeding defense, but he became a liability as a 3-point shooter, allowing teams to help off of the pick-and-roll involving Lillard and McCollum. Turner, never a good fit on paper, didn’t really figure out how to play with the team until he returned from injury later in the season. Rumors around Portland have been that Turner has been favored over Crabbe to remain with the team because of the ball-handling relief he could bring to Lillard and McCollum. Jusuf Nurkic came at the deadline, and was a savior for the team until he fractured his leg late in the year.

Portland’s first cause for concern came during June’s draft. Olshey, flush with three first round draft picks, a burgeoning guard in Crabbe, and several players with deflated trade value, could not find a suitable deal. Olshey had to settle, trading two of his first round picks to move up and take Gonzaga’s Zach Collins as Leonard’s replacement.

That move signaled that Portland’s assets weren’t as valuable as Olshey was hoping they would be. Part of that is due to the performance of the players involved, and part was due to the lower standing of Portland’s draft picks. There’s also something to be said about the NBA’s cap not expanding to the level teams projected, making the salaries of Turner, Crabbe, Leonard, and Harkless less palatable.

This is how we end up with a talented but flawed young player like Crabbe getting moved for a salary dump.

No doubt Olshey’s expectation when he matched — which was the right thing to do, by the way — was to use him and his picks in a future deal to return a third or fourth piece to the starting lineup for Portland. But the tone has swung, and now many are suggesting it was commendable that Olshey did not have to include a first round pick in order to offload Crabbe. That is really a head-scratching way to look at things, and a huge swing in expected value.

Portland is in a tough position given that none of their recommended moves from last year seem to have gone their way. Still, Olshey has been a good GM for the Blazers. He spun wheat into gold by trading for Robin Lopez, and grabbed Nurkic, a potential franchise building block center when he’s healthy for a non-championship caliber big man in Mason Plumlee. He locked down Aminu on a descending salary deal. He has done quite a bit.

Portland still has the ability to be a trade partner in deals including Carmelo Anthony, which could net them usable players or potential future assets. But what is getting harder to understand is how Portland is going to get any better outside of the roster they have now given salary considerations, team fit, and ceiling.

Drastic internal development or relenting on either Turner or the Lillard-McCollum backcourt pairing are likely the only two realistic ways the Blazers will be able to make a dent next year. Or perhaps fans in Portland can hope that Olshey will be able to work his magic yet again and turn one of their role players into a playoff spot.

The 2017-18 season has been weird enough as it is. Portland can head south of their competition or finagle their way to the postseason. At this point, neither would surprise me.