Record 45 current NBA players to compete in FIBA World Cup

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When Paul George went down with a season-ending injury during USA Basketball’s showcase in Las Vegas, many wondered how players would react, and whether or not they might choose to sit out international play in the future, foregoing the risk while saving themselves for the rigors of the NBA season instead.

Some may indeed consider things more carefully moving forward. But just about everyone who was already committed this summer decided to stick it out, and the result is a record number of current NBA players slated to compete in the FIBA World Cup which begins on Saturday.

From the official release:

A record 45 current NBA players will be featured on national team rosters for the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup, up from 44 in 2010.  The tournament features a record 75 players who have played in the NBA.

The World Cup will showcase 17 former NBA draftees whose rights are currently held by NBA teams, bringing the total number of current NBA players, former NBA players and NBA draftees participating in the tournament to a record 92.

Twenty-one of 24 national teams feature at least one current NBA player, former NBA player or NBA draftee, and 22 NBA teams are represented on national team rosters.

The stars of the league might decide to skip the Worlds in future seasons, but only a handful are good enough to be selected for the Olympics, and lesser events like these are the only chance for many players to represent their respective countries in international competition.

The entire list of players with NBA experience who (as of Aug. 29) are scheduled to compete in the FIBA World Cup is reprinted below.

The following is a complete list of current NBA players on 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup rosters: 

COUNTRY

NBA PLAYER

NBA TEAM

Argentina

Luis Scola

Indiana Pacers

Argentina

Pablo Prigioni

New York Knicks

Australia

Cameron Bairstow

Chicago Bulls

Australia

Matthew Dellavedova

Cleveland Cavaliers

Australia

Dante Exum

Utah Jazz

Australia

Brock Motum

Utah Jazz

Brazil

Anderson Varejao

Cleveland Cavaliers

Brazil

Tiago Splitter

San Antonio Spurs

Brazil

Nenê

Washington Wizards

Croatia

Bojan Bodgdanovic

Brooklyn Nets

Croatia

Damjan Rudez

Indiana Pacers

Dominican Republic

Francisco Garcia

Houston Rockets

Finland

Erik Murphy

Cleveland Cavaliers

France

Evan Fournier

Orlando Magic

France

Nicolas Batum

Portland Trail Blazers

France

Boris Diaw

San Antonio Spurs

France

Rudy Gobert

Utah Jazz

Greece

Kostas Papanikolaou

Houston Rockets

Greece

Nick Calathes

Memphis Grizzlies

Greece

Giannis Antetokounmpo

Milwaukee Bucks

Lithuania

Donatas Motiejunas

Houston Rockets

Lithuania

Jonas Valanciunas

Toronto Raptors

Mexico

Jorge Gutierrez

Brooklyn Nets

Puerto Rico

J.J. Barea

Minnesota Timberwolves

Senegal

Gorgui Dieng

Minnesota Timberwolves

Slovenia

Goran Dragić

Phoenix Suns

Spain

Pau Gasol

Chicago Bulls

Spain

Marc Gasol

Memphis Grizzlies

Spain

Ricky Rubio

Minnesota Timberwolves

Spain

José Calderon

New York Knicks

Spain

Serge Ibaka

Oklahoma City Thunder

Spain

Victor Claver

Portland Trail Blazers

Turkey

Omer Asik

New Orleans Pelicans

United States

Mason Plumlee

Brooklyn Nets

United States

Derrick Rose

Chicago Bulls

United States

Kyrie Irving

Cleveland Cavaliers

United States

Kenneth Faried

Denver Nuggets

United States

Andre Drummond

Detroit Pistons

United States

Stephen Curry

Golden State Warriors

United States

Klay Thompson

Golden State Warriors

United States

James Harden

Houston Rockets

United States

Anthony Davis

New Orleans Pelicans

United States

DeMarcus Cousins

Sacramento Kings

United States

Rudy Gay

Sacramento Kings

United States

DeMar DeRozan

Toronto Raptors

The following is a complete list of NBA free agents on 2014 FIBA World Cup rosters:

 

COUNTRY

NBA PLAYER

MOST RECENT NBA TEAM

Australia

Aron Baynes

San Antonio Spurs

Brazil

Leandro Barbosa

Phoenix Suns

Mexico

Gustavo Ayon

Atlanta Hawks

Philippines

Andray Blatche

Brooklyn Nets

Serbia

Miroslav Raduljica

Los Angeles Clippers

 

The following is a complete list of former NBA players on 2014 FIBA World Cup rosters*:

 

COUNTRY

NBA PLAYER

MOST RECENT NBA TEAM

Argentina

Walter Herrmann

Detroit Pistons

Argentina

Andres Nocioni

Philadelphia 76ers

Australia

David Andersen

New Orleans Hornets

Australia

Nathan Jawai

Minnesota Timberwolves

Brazil

Alex Garcia

New Orleans Hornets

Brazil

Marcus Vinicius

New Orleans Hornets

Croatia

Oliver Lafayette

Boston Celtics

Croatia

Damir Markota

Milwaukee Bucks

Croatia

Roko Ukic

Milwaukee Bucks

Finland

Hanno Möttölä

Atlanta Hawks

France

Mickael Gelabale

Minnesota Timberwolves

Greece

Andreas Glyniadakis

Seattle SuperSonics

Iran

Hamed Haddadi

Phoenix Suns

New Zealand

Kirk Penney

San Antonio Spurs

Puerto Rico

Carlos Arroyo

Boston Celtics

Puerto Rico

Renaldo Balkman

New York Knicks

Puerto Rico

Daniel Santiago

Milwaukee Bucks

Senegal

Hamady N’Diaye

Sacramento Kings

Serbia

Nenad Krstic

Boston Celtics

Slovenia

Uroš Slokar

Toronto Raptors

Spain

Rudy Fernandez

Denver Nuggets

Spain

Juan Carlos Navarro

Memphis Grizzlies

Spain

Sergio Rodriguez

New York Knicks

Ukraine

Pooh Jeter

Sacramento Kings

Ukraine

Slava Kravtsov

Phoenix Suns

David Stern: ‘Shame on the Brooklyn Nets’

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Brooklyn rested Brook Lopez, Jeremy Lin and Trevor Booker for its final game this season, which had huge playoff implications. Not for the Nets, of course. They were long eliminated from postseason contention.

But the Bulls beat Brooklyn to reach the playoffs over the Heat, who also won that night.

Miami fans were obviously ticked, and they have company in former NBA commissioner David Stern.

Stern, via Sam Amick of USA Today:

“I have no idea what was in the mind of the executives of the Brooklyn Nets — none — when they rested their starting players,” Stern, who still holds the title of Commissioner Emeritus, told USA TODAY Sports on Tuesday on the NBA A to Z podcast. “If you’re playing in a game of consequence, that has an impact, which is as good as it gets (you should play your players). Here we are, the Brooklyn Nets are out of the running. They have the lowest record in the sport. But they have an opportunity to weigh in on the final game with respect to Chicago. And they sit their starters? Really? It’s inexcusable in my view. I don’t think the Commissioner maybe can, or even should, do anything about it. But shame on the Brooklyn Nets. They broke the (pact with fans).”

The resting dilemma takes slightly different forms when it involves a team like Brooklyn rather than a certain playoff team, but the underlying conflict remains the same:

The team is better off resting its players.

The NBA is worse off, at least in the short term.

The league was robbed of an important competitive game that could’ve drawn higher ratings. The Nets had just beaten Chicago a days prior, but that was with major contributions from Lopez and Lin. Without them, Brooklyn had little chance and lost by 39.

The Nets weren’t playing for anything, not even a higher draft pick. They owe their first-rounder to the Celtics and already clinched the worst record anyway. Brooklyn was better off resting those veterans at the end of a long regular season.

There’s no easy answer. If the NBA bans resting, teams will sit players and assign to minor or made-up injuries. If the league shortens the season, it will lose revenue.

The best solution is to improve at the margins – provide more rest days (which the league will do next season) and schedule nationally televised games outside of grueling stretches of the schedule. That’s obviously no silver bullet, though. Bulls-Nets wasn’t nationally televised, and Brooklyn had the day off before and the entire offseason off after.

Another potential solution: Shaming teams into playing their top players. Stern is giving that one a go.

NBA looking into Rockets’ owner interacting with referee during game

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Like every Rockets fan — and, let’s be honest, every fan of every team — Leslie Alexander is convinced the referees were screwing over his Rockets.

Except that Alexander is the owner of the Rockets.

And he approached a referee during game play.

The NBA is understandably investigating this, as reported by the Houston Chronicle.

The NBA said an investigation “is underway” into Rockets’ owner Leslie Alexander’s getting up from his courtside seat to have a few words with official Bill Kennedy in the first half.

Alexander appeared to say something to Kennedy during a Thunder possession before returning to his seat. Alexander declined to give any detail beyond he was “upset … really upset.” Rockets guard James Harden said he didn’t see his owner get up. “He did that?” a surprised Harden said after the game. “He’s the coolest guy. I would have helped him.”

The NBA doesn’t let players or coaches cross a line when talking to officials, but they are at least allowed to interact and discuss calls with a ref during a game. It’s something else entirely for an owner to get in the ear of an official during game play.

I’d expect Alexander will see a fine for this.

Whatever he thought of the officiating, the Rockets won to advance on to the second round of the Western Conference playoffs.

Steve Kerr to see Stanford specialists about back issues, is optimistic about return to bench

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If he were not coaching a perennial contender and a team where he genuinely has a deep bond with the players, the GM, and his fellow coaches, Steve Kerr might have walked away from basketball for a while. The pain from spinal fluid leakage from a couple of back surgeries he had two summers ago (the ones that led to Luke Walton coaching the first half of the season in Golden State) would have been too much.

But he tolerated and managed the pain as best he could, until a few days ago when it became too much. Kerr did not coach the final two games of the Warriors sweep of the Trail Blazers and said he would not return to the bench until healthy enough to do so.

Kerr’s next step is to talk to specialists at Stanford University’s medical program, and Kerr is optimistic about the long-term prognosis, he told Monty Poole of NBC Sports Bay Area.

He revealed to NBCSportsBayArea.com that in recent days he has spoken to several people who have experienced the debilitating effects of a cerebrospinal fluid leak and been able to overcome it. He says that because his symptoms have intensified over the past week, in an odd twist, that may make it easier for specialists to trace the precise source.

“That’s what the next few days are all about,” Kerr said, standing down the hallway from the visitor’s locker room. “They’re trying to find it. If they can find it, they can fix it.”

He’ll begin in the coming days by consulting with specialists at Stanford Medical Center, which has some of the more respected surgeons in the world.

Kerr said his spirits have been lifted by other people who went through this, people who told him doctors found the leak and it changed their lives, that they bounced back to 100 percent. He said that the first back surgeries did their job in relieving his lower back pain, but it has led to spinal fluid leakage that is worse than the symptoms the first surgery solved.

Whether a fix can happen to get him back on the bench these playoffs is immaterial, we all hope it happens just so Kerr the person can go back to enjoying his life without chronic pain. He’ll be around the team as much as he can through the playoffs, but there are far more important things going on with him than basketball right now.

 

Thunder’s offseason moves start here: Offer Russell Westbrook $220 million contract

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The narrative of Oklahoma City’s first-round playoff loss to Houston — and frankly its entire season — was about how little help Russell Westbrook was given. Game 5 was the perfect example: The Thunder were +12 when Westbrook was on the court, but he rested for 6:07 and OKC was -18 in those minutes. The Thunder’s role players are young and many — for example, Enes Kanter — are very one dimensional, but that’s because their role was supposed to be much more narrow and defined. Then Kevin Durant left and players were asked to do things outside their comfort zones, or grow up fast, and it didn’t go that well.

Thunder GM Sam Presti has some work to do this summer to tweak that roster, make it more versatile, and design it to fit better around Westbrook (not to mention take some of the load off him).

But the first thing Presti has to do is keep Westbrook — and that means offering him a five-year, roughly $220 million extension. Royce Young if ESPN has the details on how that works.

After signing an extension last summer in the wake of Durant’s departure, Westbrook can sign another in the ballpark of $220 million over five years this summer. Westbrook is signed through the 2017-18 season, with a player option on the following year, but the Thunder would obviously like to have a longer commitment from their franchise player.

The expectation is that they will make the offer, but should Westbrook decline, all that talk of stabilizing the franchise would get a little more wobbly, and with only a year guaranteed, talk of trading him could spark again. It will certainly be alarming for the front office, especially after what it went through with Durant.

It’s hard to imagine Westbrook walking away from that money — it’s about $75 million more guaranteed and one more year than any other team can offer. That’s a lot of cash to leave on the table, I don’t care how much you make in endorsements. (If Westbrook left, signed a max deal elsewhere for four years, then signed a max deal for that fifth year later, he still would get roughly $35 million less than signing with the Thunder now.) Once Westbrook is locked into place, Presti can start looking to reshape the Thunder roster.

But if Westbrook pauses and doesn’t sign, the NBA rumor mill will be moving at the speed of Westbrook in transition. The Thunder wouldn’t want to lose Durant and Westbrook for nothing, it would set their rebuilding process way back, so Presti would have to consider trades. However, because Westbrook is a free agent in 2018, he would almost have a no-trade clause — no team is going to give up much to get him without an under-the-table understanding he would re-sign in that city.

Expect Westbrook to agree to the extension in OKC. Because he likes the team — remember, he signed that extension last summer (which got him a healthy pay raise) — and because it would make him the highest-paid player in the NBA, and that would feed his ego (and pocketbook).

Once he does, Presti’s real work begins.