Report: Clippers plan to stretch Carlos Delfino, waive Miroslav Raduljica

3 Comments

The Clippers traded Jared Dudley and first-round pick, and all they’ll have to show for it is a little – and I mean a little – roster flexibility.

In the deal with Milwaukee, the Clippers netted Carlos Delfino and Miroslav Raduljica. Initially, there were questions about Delfino’s health and where Raduljica fit into Los Angeles’ center rotation.

But those concerns are probably irrelevant.

Sam Amick of USA Today:

Yet according to a person with knowledge of the Clippers’ situation, it’s likely that Delfino – who is owed $3.25 million next season and has a team option for the 2015-16 campaign – will be waived using what’s deemed the "stretch provision."

One strong free agent possibility is 27-year-old shooting guard Chris Douglas Roberts, though he can’t sign until the aforementioned moves are made. Roberts averaged 6.9 points and 20.7 minutes for the Charlotte Hornets last season in 49 games. Another possibility is big man Ekpe Udoh, the 27-year-old who visited with the Clippers on Tuesday. Udoh, who was taken sixth overall by the Golden State Warriors in the 2010 draft, spent the last three seasons coming off the bench for the Milwaukee Bucks. Raduljica is also likely to be waived by the Clippers.

If you’re wondering why the Clippers didn’t just stretch Dudley, they couldn’t because his contract was signed under the previous Collective Bargaining Agreement (hat tip: Kevin Pelton of ESPN).

When a team stretches a player, his remaining guaranteed salary counts against the cap evenly across double the number of years remaining on his contract plus one. Delfino has two years remaining, including a fully unguaranteed season. Opinions are split on whether Delfino’s remaining guaranteed salary ($3.25 million) would be spread over five years (which would account for his unguaranteed season) or three years (which wouldn’t). I believe, though I see logic behind both interpretations, it would be spread over five years, but it’s not totally clear.

The Clippers are hard-capped due their signing of Spencer Hawes for the non-taxpayer mid-level exception, and they currently lack room to sign another player. If they stretch Delfino – regardless of whether his salary is spread over five or three years – they could sign three players to minimum one-year contracts.

It’s unclear whether the Clippers plan to stretch or Raduljica, who is owed $1.5 million this season followed by an unguaranteed year, or eat his entire salary this season. But stretching him and Delfino – again regardless of whether their salaries are spread across three or five years – would allow the Clippers to add a fourth minimum-salary player.

Because the Clippers have already used their full mid-level and bi-annual exceptions, they have no mechanism to offer free agents more than minimum salaries. Perhaps, though, they have a trade up their sleeve. Hopefully they do – because free agents are slim pickings.

No unrestricted free agent left on the market justifies sending away a first-round pick. Not Douglas-Roberts and Udoh, both of whom are fine but available for a reason.

Doc Rivers clearly wasn’t fond of Dudley, but this was far too steep of a price to pay for the ability sign a couple extra minimum-salary players. Had they just kept Dudley, the Clippers could have fit one more minimum-salary player under the hard cap.

Beyond losing a first-round pick, the Clippers will also face a cap hit for Delfino (and maybe Raduljica) multiple years in the future. That negates some of the savings scheduled for next summer, when Dudley’s contract remains guaranteed and Delfino’s and Raduljica’s don’t.

Yes, Dudley is gone, but at some point the Clippers must show what they gained. It apparently won’t be Delfino or Raduljica.

2017 NBA playoffs have been historically uncompetitive

AP Photo/Elise Amendola
Leave a comment

The NBA Finals so many wanted to see – Cavaliers-Warriors III – is here.

At least it will be.

Today is the first of six off days before the 2017, which begin June 1 in Oakland.

The lengthy delay is the product of an underwhelming postseason featuring few competitive series and numerous blowouts.

Golden State swept its way through the West, and Cleveland dropped only one game (to the Celtics in the conference finals) while winning the East. There have been only two Game 7s, but considering the magnitude, neither felt that compelling. Blake Griffin‘s injury undercut the Clippers against the Jazz, and Celtics over Wizards felt inevitable with home teams winning each game of the series. Between, there have been several lackluster games and series.

There have been just 74 playoff games this year – the fewest before the Finals since since the NBA instituted a best-of-seven first round in 2003:

image

That’s 74 of a possible 98 games – 76%, the lowest since 1999 and seventh-lowest ever.

Even if the Finals go seven games, it will be the fewest games in a postseason since 2007. If the Finals go five or fewer games, it’ll be the shortest postseason in this playoff format.

And it hasn’t just been quantity. The quality of games has been lacking, too.

Though there were more blowouts last year by nearly any measure, the 2017 postseason’s average margin in pre-Finals games (13.5) is fifth-highest all-time and second-highest since 1959 (behind 2016, 14.2).

Combine the two factors, and these are the drabbest playoffs in nearly 50 years. Here’s each postseason plotted by average margin in pre-Finals games and percentage of possible games pre-Finals:

image

This probably just confirms what you’ve seen: The 2017 playoffs have been in a rut.

We’re all counting on the Cavaliers and Warriors to salvage this postseason, but considering how deep the hole is, anything less than an epic Finals probably won’t cut it.

Kyrie Irving crosses over Avery Bradley, hits 3-pointer (video)

Leave a comment

Avery Bradley got around one screen then, thanks to Kyrie Irving‘s excellent ball-handling, lunged at another that wasn’t coming as Irving hit a 3-pointer.

LeBron James beautifully pass-fakes, makes layup in transition (video)

1 Comment

LeBron James is a treasure.

Shaquille O’Neal’s big toe is seriously jacked up (PHOTO)

shaq o'neal
Getty
Leave a comment

Remember how we we all freaked out when we saw pictures of LeBron James‘ feet back in 2013?

You probably didn’t want to be reminded that it existed, but it does. Still. And apparently jacked up feet is the consequence of a lifetime of playing professional basketball. Once can only assume it has something to do with tight shoes and constant, hard changes of direction in said tight shoes.

We got yet another vision of what basketball shoes can do to feet on Thursday when TNT analyst Shaquille O’Neal showed off his, er, little piggies.

Much to the horror of the Internet in general, it was Shaq’s right big toe that took social media by storm. Mostly because it’s not even close to pointing in the right direction.

I’m going to show you what it looks like. Be forewarned, it might just be NSFL.

Via Twitter:

Oh. Oh … why?

Social media reacted appropriately and proportionately:

Shaq did have issues with that toe during the course of his career, and at one point it was so bad that he had to have surgery to remove bone spurs from the toe in 2002.

That still doesn’t explain why it’s all over your TV and the Internet, but here we are. I am sorry.