Detroit Pistons v Washington Wizards

Report: Greg Monroe tells Pistons he will sign $5.5 million qualifying offer, become free agent next year


He wasn’t bluffing.

When rumors leaked that Greg Monroe was thinking about signing the qualifying offer and playing out his rookie contract to get out of Detroit as a free agent next summer rather than accept the team’s terms (reportedly a little more than the they paid Josh Smith the year before) most people around the league thought it was a bluff. Mostly because nobody else had ever turned down that kind of money (more than $11 million a year) and taken a year of injury risk just to get out of town.

Looks like Monroe wasn’t bluffing.

From Jeff Zillgitt of the USA Today.

Forward-center Greg Monroe has informed the Detroit Pistons’ he will accept the qualifying offer, play for Detroit in 2014-15 and become an unrestricted free agent next summer, two people familiar with Monroe’s plan told USA TODAY Sports….

Monroe, 24, was a restricted free agent this summer but decided not to sign an offer sheet with another team or sign a multiyear extension with the Pistons….

Monroe’s qualifying offer is for $5.479 million in 2014-15 and cannot be traded without his consent once he signs. He’s expected to sign it before the Oct. 1 deadline.

That deadline means the Pistons have a little time to up their offer or find a sign-and-trade that would work for Monroe.

Monroe averaged 15.2 points and 9.3 rebounds a game last season, with a solid true shooting percentage of .531 and a well above average PER of 18.1. A lot of people think he could develop into an All-Star center. That said, playing next to Josh Smith (and Andre Drummond) stunted Monroe’s growth. Those three cannot play together, but the Pistons likely bring them all back this year.

Most restricted free agents try to get another team to make them a big offer that their current team would have to match. Monroe did not do that. While he has a lot of fans in front offices around the league — and will be very sought after as a free agent next summer — teams thought the Pistons would match pretty much any offer so they didn’t make one. Monroe’s agent tried to find a sign-and-trade but nothing happened.

So he is going with his only card — take the risk of whatever happens this season playing for rookie money for the reward of unrestricted free agency next year. Get injured or have a bad season and the gamble fails.

But he wants out that badly.

Somewhere, Eric Bledsoe is sitting, watching, and wondering if he should do the same thing.

Report: Rockets will try to sign Alessandro Gentile next summer

Alessandro Gentile, Paulius Jankunas
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The Rockets tried signing Sergio Llull this summer, but he opted for a long-term extension with Real Madrid.

So, they’ll just turn to another player in their large chest of stashed draft picks – Alessandro Gentile.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Gentile, who was selected No. 53 in the 2014, is a 22-year-old wing for Armani Milano. He’s a good scorer, but he primarily works from mid-range – an area the Rockets eschew. He can get to the rim in Europe, but his subpar athleticism might hinder him in the NBA.

If Gentile comes stateside, he’ll face a steep learning curve. But he’s young enough and talented enough that he could develop into a rotation player.

Report: Hawks co-owner made more money by exposing Danny Ferry’s Luol Deng comments

Michael Gearon, Bruce Levenson
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A terribly kept secret: Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon Jr. wanted to get rid of general manager Danny Ferry.

Many believe that’s why Gearon made such a big deal about Ferry’s pejorative “African” comment about Luol Deng – that Gearon was more concerned about ousting Ferry than showing real concern over racism.

Gearon had another, no less sinister, reason to raise concern over Ferry’s remarks.

Kevin Arnovitz and Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

While Gearon felt that Ferry, as he wrote in the June 2014 email to Levenson, “put the entire franchise in jeopardy,” Gearon also figured to benefit financially from a Sterling-esque fallout.

In the spring of 2014, Gearon was in the process of selling more of his interest in the team to Levenson and the partners he had sold to in September. The agreed-upon price for roughly a third of Gearon’s remaining shares valued the Hawks at approximately $450 million, according to reports from sources.

“We accept your offer to buy the remaining 31 million,” Gearon wrote in an email to Levenson on April 17, 2014. “Let me know next steps so we can keep this simple as you suggested without a bunch of lawyers and bankers.”

Approximately five weeks later — just a little more than a week before the fateful conference call — Steve Ballmer agreed to pay $2 billion for the Clippers, a record-smashing price that completely changed the assessed value of NBA franchises. Gearon firmly maintains he was acting out of the sincerity of his convictions to safeguard the franchise from the Sterling stench, but such a spectacle also allowed him to wiggle out of selling his shares at far below market value.

Gearon and his legal team later challenged the notion that the sell-down was bound by any sort of contractual obligation and that any papers were signed. Once the organization became involved in the investigation, the sale of the shares was postponed.

Arnovitz and Windhorst did an incredible amount of reporting here. I suggest you read the full piece, which includes much more background on the Gearon-Ferry rift.

Considering the Hawks sold for $850 million, Gearon definitely made more money than if he’d sold his shares at a $450 million valuation.

Did that motivate him? Probably, though it doesn’t have to be one or the other. Most likely, his actions were derived from at least three desires – making more money, ousting Ferry and combating racism. Parsing how much each contributed is much more difficult.

What Ferry said was racist, whether or not he was looking at more racism on the sheet of paper in front of him. His comments deserved punishment.

But if Gearon didn’t have incentive to use them for his own benefit, would we even know about them? How many other teams, with more functional front offices, would have kept similar remarks under wraps or just ignored them?