Greg Monroe, DeAndre Jordan

Report: Pistons increase offer to restricted free agent Greg Monroe


Just two high-quality free agents remain – Eric Bledsoe and Greg Monroe – and they’re still on the market due only to their restricted status.

In Phoenix, things between the Suns and Bledsoe are getting testy. (Don’t worry, the Suns are getting their point of view out, too.)

The Pistons’ negotiations with Monroe haven’t devolved to that level of public disagreement.

But that doesn’t mean they’re any closer than Bledsoe and the Suns to a deal.

Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

The Pistons have moved from the initial five-year, $60-million offer and an offer that’s slightly better than the four-year, $54-million deal that Josh Smith signed last summer is on the table.

But the offer to make him the highest paid player on the roster hasn’t brokered an agreement. And negotiations aren’t ongoing.

Unlike Phoenix, which seems steadfast on its our-year, $48 million offer for Bledsoe, the Pistons’ willingness to negotiate stands out.

It’s unclear whether Monroe or Detroit is pushing toward a shorter deal with a higher annual salary. Are the Pistons willing to pay Monroe more per year as long as their total investment isn’t too burdensome? Or does Monroe want a shorter contract and the ability to become an unrestricted free agent sooner?

I’m sure Monroe fancies himself a max-contract player, and there is a case to be made in a vacuum. But unless he draws a max offer sheet at this late stage, there’s practically no incentive for the Pistons to pay him that much.

And it doesn’t seem Monroe will get a max offer sheet. The 76ers are the only team with enough cap room, and though a sign-and-trade is possible, it would require another team offering Detroit satisfactory compensation.

At this point, it’s possible Monroe is trying to set himself up for his third NBA contract. Perhaps, playing with Josh Smith isn’t in Monroe’s best interest. No question, the two and Andre Drummond functioned poorly together last season, and Monroe took a brunt of the hit.

But new Pistons president/coach Stan Van Gundy has made Monroe his top offseason priority and called Monroe and Drummond an “ideal pairing.” Drummond, not Smith is Detroit’s franchise player. So, that should signal to Monroe he’s in good hands, right?

Monroe needn’t be certain of that, but if he’s leaning toward that being the case, he shouldn’t pass up more than $54 million over four years (or maybe $60 million over five) for a $5,479,934 qualifying offer.

There’s still plenty of time to reach a deal, and this process is naturally slow. The Pistons’ willingness to increase their offer shows progress, but considering negotiations aren’t ongoing, the finish line probably remains far.

Eventually, Monroe will either bring Detroit a qualifying offer or get serious about discussing the structure of his next contract. In the meantime, both sides wait – and for now at least, avoid the Bledsoe-Suns-style public bickering.

AP Source: Pistons in talks about downtown move; no deal yet

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 15: Owner Tom Gores of the Detroit Pistons tosses the ball to a referee during the game with the Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center on December 15, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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DETROIT (AP) — The Detroit Pistons could be starting their final season at The Palace of Auburn Hills.

The team is in advanced discussions about moving downtown to play at the Detroit Red Wings’ new arena, according to a person with knowledge of the talks. The person, speaking Thursday on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press because the Pistons have not commented, said there is no deal yet but the intent would be for the NBA franchise to start playing downtown next season if possible.

Representatives from the Pistons and Olympia Entertainment have been involved in the talks. Olympia handles business operations for the Red Wings, who are owned by Mike and Marian Ilitch.

The Pistons play this season’s home opener in Auburn Hills on Friday night against Orlando. The Palace has been home to the Pistons since 1988. Prior to that, the team played at the Pontiac Silverdome for a decade. The last time the Pistons played downtown for an extended stretch was when they called Cobo Arena home from 1961-78.

The Red Wings are playing their final season at Joe Louis Arena before moving to Little Caesars Arena. The new venue is being built right across the highway from where the Tigers and Lions play at Comerica Park and Ford Field, and a group is hoping to put a stadium for a Major League Soccer franchise in that area as well.

The Pistons won championships in their first two seasons in Auburn Hills and again in 2004, but the atmosphere slipped in recent years as the team went through several dreadful seasons. Detroit returned to the playoffs last season for the first time since 2009.

Current owner Tom Gores bought the Pistons from Karen Davidson in 2011.

Crain’s Detroit Business, citing unidentified sources, reported earlier this week that talks on moving the team were continuing between Pistons ownership and Olympia Entertainment. Mark Barnhill, a partner at Gores-founded Platinum Equity, said he had no comment on reports of the team’s potential move downtown.

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Sixers fan who flipped off Russell Westbrook apologizes

PHILADELPHIA, PA - OCTOBER 26:: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains graphic content)  A Philadelphia 76ers fan gives Russell Westbrook #0 of the Oklahoma City Thunder the middle finger in the first quarter at Wells Fargo Center on October 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)

NBA players have some pretty nasty things yelled at them by angry, frustrated fans during games. Most of the time they ignore it.

But when Russell Westbrook got the double “bird” from a Sixers fan during the first quarter of Philadelphia’s home opener Wednesday — broadcast on national television — the best part was Westbrook’s reaction.

He was rightly ejected for the incident. That man is Richard Harkaway, a urologist in the city. By Thursday night, he had issued a statement apologizing to everyone involved, via

“As a part-time comedian I realize that my words and actions are sometimes inappropriate,” Harkaway said in a statement to issued by a personal representative. “In this instance, after standing up to boo and being provoked by Russell Westbrook calling attention to my being overweight, my action in response was clearly inexcusable and I am embarrassed. I sincerely apologize to my fellow Sixers fans, the Sixers organization, my colleagues and patients, and to Mr. Westbrook for my behavior.”

Harkaway had previously written this on Facebook about the incident, via the New York Post.

“Not as simple as it seems. I love to scream at the players and anyone who has been to a game with me knows this. Part of my charm. What you may not have seen on any of the video clips is what started the whole thing, which was Russell Westbrook saying ‘sit down f—ing fat boy’ when I stood up to boo.”

On some level, this feels like part of a larger national conversation taking place, one about treating each other with basic civility even if we disagree. If you pay for your ticket and you want to boo or heckle a player you have that right — Donald Sterling would heckle his own Clipper players. But there is a line of common decency you should not cross. Harkaway crossed that line, and with that he forfeited his right to be at the game (despite some early local reports, he was ejected).

In this case, it’s time to accept the apology and move on.

DeMarcus Cousins on new Kings coach: “I like him and he likes me”

Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins (15) reacts to a foul called against him during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Phoenix Suns, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)
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Dave Joerger was hired in Sacramento to do nearly the impossible: Turn around the Kings into a playoff team with potential, and develop a relationship with DeMarcus Cousins that makes the game’s best center want to stay in Sacramento (his contract is up in the summer of 2018).

The Kings won their opening game and return home Thursday to open their new building against the Spurs (a stiffer test than the Suns, to put it kindly).

As for the relationship part, Joerger is at least doing better than George Karl, as Cousins told our old friend Brett Pollakoff working for SLAM.

Jason Jones at The Sacramento Bee had a longer quote.

“Joerger’s been great,” Cousins said. “I think what he brought to the team is what this team needed. It fits our identity more than how we played in the past. Not to knock any of the previous situations but I think this situation fits this team the best.”

Cousins said last week he likes that’s there’s no gray area with Joerger. He makes everything plain and clear and that’s a plus.

It’s a good start for Joerger, but will it be enough? The feeling from most people around the league outside Sacramento is that it’s too late, the well has been poisoned and Cousins will leave the Kings as a free agent in two summers if they don’t trade him before then.

The Kings are not giving up that easily, especially in the first season in a new building — it is a franchise that wants to show Cousins it has turned the corner. Don’t expect any move with Cousins this season — landing elite players is hard and the Kings don’t want to give up on the one they have. The Kings may eventually have to face a decision on making a trade, but they are not there yet.

Meanwhile, other teams are just circling and waiting.

Derrick Rose with a frank assessment of Knicks opener vs. Cavaliers

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Derrick Rose #25 of the New York Knicks controls the ball against the Cleveland Cavaliers on October 25, 2016 at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)
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The Knicks are primed for a slow start. New coach teaching a new, modified system. New starting point guard who missed most of training camp. New defensive anchor at center, who missed most of training camp. New players throughout the roster, plus the need to develop and highlight Kristaps Porzingis. It’s going to take time to find how it all fits together.

Then their opening game is against the defending champion Cavaliers? Welcome to the NBA.

The Cavaliers won going away, with LeBron James looking every bit the best player on the planet. Derrick Rose, how would you assess the Knicks’ play? Via Barbara Barker of Newsday.

You have to love that Rose is honest. And he’s right.

Rose was part of the problem with the ball movement — 41.2 percent of his shots in that game came after seven or more dribbles and after he held the ball for at least six seconds. Carmelo Anthony was better, but not great. The Knicks stagnation on offense in the second half was a sharp contrast from the way the Cavaliers shared the rock all night.

The Knicks ball movement should get better as Jeff Hornacek pushes this team and they get more comfortable with the balance of pace (which we saw in the first half) and running the triangle (which they did much more after the game was a blowout, almost like a practice). It is going to take time to find that balance. At the same time, the team’s defense needs a lot of work, and the bench needs to improve.

All of that can happen, but in a tight Eastern Conference a slow start could be a tough hole for the Knicks to climb out of.