Will Paul George’s injury change USA roster for 2016 Olympics?

5 Comments

The pendulum has swung to the other side.

No doubt what happened to Paul George was gruesome. The fourth quarter of a relatively meaningless USA Basketball exhibition and one of the NBA’s rising stars goes up to block a James Harden shot, comes down with his foot on the base of too-close basketball stanchion and shatters his leg. He’s done for the next year, at least. Whether he is ever the same remains to be seen (although we all hope so).

It scared owners and GMs who have long feared such a thing and they leaned on their media sources about how this could be a tipping point for major NBA players in international competitions. How they don’t like to see the guys they are guaranteed to pay millions to playing for free internationally and risking these kinds of injuries.

Could what happened to George impact the USA’s roster for the 2016 Olympics in Rio?

Probably not much.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has already told the USA Today’s Sam Amick, “I don’t anticipate a major shift in the NBA’s participation in international competitions.”

Damian Lillard has already said he’s not backing away and his attitude will be the prevalent one among the ultra-competitive nature of NBA players.

Then there is the money. Many of the top players will want to go because the Olympics are a big stage and if you are an elite player trying to promote your brand it is the kind of platform you need to be on. To put it bluntly, if Kevin Durant wants to sell the latest Nike KD shoes in South America, Europe and China then the Olympics are a big marketing tool and everyone knows it. Same with Derrick Rose and adidas. Domestically NBA rings matter more than gold medals, but internationally that scale tips some. It’s hard to just say no.

Might LeBron James say no to chasing a basketball record fourth gold? Yes. But he might have anyway. There is no doubt some guys may be more hesitant and teams will be more cautious. But younger stars will want to go.

If a player is injured coming into the summer might the team pressure him to sit? Yes. But they would have done that anyway. See this summer when the Spurs would not release Manu Ginobili to play.

That summer is also a potentially big free agent summer and if a player doesn’t have a deal lined up or is trying to force a trade he may stay out. Think Kevin Love this summer.

But for the NBA to step in more unilaterally is hypocritical. The NBA asks players to play international exhibitions every year for free — NBA players do not get paid for those NBA pre-season games in China, Brazil, Mexico and the like (players are paid during the regular season, they get only a per diam during the preseason). The NBA is fine disrupting its schedule to have a couple of teams play one game in a week during the regular season in London.

But the Olympics would be bad?

NBA owners/GMs do have legitimate concerns. It’s less about Team USA and more about some international players who are pressured into EuroBasket and the World Cup and the Olympics and qualifying tournaments for all of them. It can be a drain. (It’s less of an issue with the very deep Team USA talent pool.) And Mark Cuban has an interesting idea in the NBA putting on its own World Cup so that the NBA owners would profit from these extra games (line their pockets instead of someone else’s’ and suddenly an international tournament is a good idea). Frankly both of those things can go hand-in-hand.

Former Commissioner David Stern floated the idea of doing with the Olympics what soccer has done — make it an under-22 tournament. The idea is to make the World Cup (run by FIBA or the NBA) a bigger event but limit the number of big events the main stars are asked to play. That can work, too, although it seems less likely.

The idea of limiting the number of international tournaments top stars are asked to play is a fair one.

But Pacers’ president Larry Bird is right that these kinds of injuries can happen anywhere. The NBA would be foolish to tell guys they can’t go to play at Rucker Park in New York, the Drew League in Los Angeles, The Goodman League in Washington D.C., the Seattle Pro-Am series or a host of other popular pro-ams in the summer because that helps grow the game, too.

It’s about balance. A better one may need to be struck with regard to international tournaments.

But the Olympics are too big a stage right now not to think the best and brightest will want to step on it and add a gold medal or two to their resume. To cut that off would be bad for the NBA.

Celtics’ Gordon Hayward says he’s open to returning this season

Getty Images
Leave a comment

BOSTON (AP) — Celtics guard Gordon Hayward says he is open to playing this season, but says it will depend on how fast he is able to heal and show progress as he works his way back from a broken left ankle.

Hayward was at TD Garden on Friday for Boston’s matchup with the Utah Jazz, the team he left this past summer in free agency after seven seasons to sign a four-year, $128 million contract with the Celtics. He was injured in Boston’s season opener at Cleveland.

Wednesday marked a milestone in Hayward’s recovery process, when he was able to shed the walking boot he’s been using since his surgery in October. He will continue to wear a protective brace during the rehab process.

He said he doesn’t know how long he will have to wear the brace. But he said he is now allowed to do some shooting and begin working more on mobility.

 

Russell Westbrook triple-double keys OKC in 3OT thriller vs 76ers

Leave a comment

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Russell Westbrook had 27 points, 17 rebounds and 15 assists, and Oklahoma City and the Philadelphia 76ers went basket-for-basket in a three-overtime thriller before the Thunder pulled out a 119-117 victory on Friday night.

Andre Roberson scored the winner with 10 seconds left for the Thunder. But one of the early contenders for NBA game of the year belonged to Joel Embiid and Westbrook as they drove, blocked and rebounded their way toward one big play after another.

Embiid scored 34 points in 48 minutes with an achy back and rallied the Sixers from a 17-point hole.

Embiid, Philly’s franchise center and social media star, grabbed his lower back when he took a hard foul on a drive to the basket in the fourth quarter. Embiid grimaced during timeouts on the bench and trudged into position a few times.

Embiid sucked it up and carried the Sixers in the fourth and the first overtime. His feed to a charging Ben Simmons on the baseline for a two-handed dunk tied the score at 94-all with 53 seconds left in the quarter. The Sixers closed the fourth on an 11-0 run.

Embiid scored the first bucket of OT and the Sixers led for the first time in the game. The Sixers’ five-point lead with 1:20 left in overtime was wiped out on Paul George‘s 3-pointer and a Westbrook bucket that made it 102-all. The Sixers blew their final possession on an ill-conceived 3 for Dario Saric.

Round 2 was just as fun.

Westbrook and Robert Covington exchanged 3s and George tied it at 109 on a driving layup. Westbrook and Embiid swapped buckets that kept it even and the Sixers had one more chance to win it with 1.2 seconds to go in the second OT.

Embiid and Westbrook combined to score eight straight points in the third overtime, and Embiid even waved goodbye as the crowd went wild when Steve Adams fouled out of the game.

But Embiid seemed gassed at the end and there’s no telling how the heavy workload may affect his availability the rest of the week.

The Sixers were featured on ESPN on Friday as part of Philadelphia All Access, and Sixers’ related content was aired throughout the day on all platforms.

“I’m not a fan,” coach Brett Brown said. “I like living behind closed doors.”

But Brown understood the exposure would help build the brand and serve as a recruiting pitch of sorts to any free agents intrigued about becoming part of The Process. The Sixers put on a show in the fourth until Embiid gave them a scare.

Embiid’s health woes have dogged him since his college career at Kansas and every slip, ache or bump throws Sixers fans into a panic. Embiid has been banged-up lately but he calmly went to the line and made both free throws. He fell again when he tripped over Adams, who earned a foul, and sank two more free throws to make it 78-72.

 

After Thunder win, Russell Westbrook trolls Joel Embiid, waves goodbye, tells him to “go home”

11 Comments

Joel Embiid was making friends all over the court on Friday night.

First, he got into a jawing match with Carmelo Anthony. Also during the first overtime, Embiid blocked Russell Westbrook‘s driving attempt at a game winner.

After the Thunder won in triple overtime, Westbrook trolled Embiid by waving goodbye to the Sixers’ center, who was yelling back at him.

When asked about it, Westbrook said Embiid was talking a lot so he told the Sixers center to go home.

That can have some serious connotations — Embiid was born in Cameroon. Westbrook may have meant “go to the locker room” or “go to where you live,” but considering Embiid is an immigrant it comes off very poorly for Westbrook.

Embiid threw a little fire back at Westbrook.

The league office is going to be looking into this one.

DeMarcus Cousins doesn’t expect Pelicans to trade him at the deadline

Getty Images
2 Comments

The New Orleans Pelicans have a decision to make as they approach the trade deadline: Do they think they can re-sign DeMarcus Cousins next summer to stay in the Big Easy with Anthony Davis?

If the answer is no, then they have to consider trading Cousins at the deadline to at least get something back. There is a lot of context, however, that makes this seeming binary trade/keep decision far more complicated.

Cousins himself doesn’t think he is going anywhere, as he told Marc Spears of ESPN’s The Undefeated.

While the Pelicans have a lot to consider with the unrestricted free agent, Cousins says he is confident that he will still be playing for New Orleans after the Feb. 8 trade deadline.

“I am confident in my team,” Cousins said. “I am starting to understand this business a lot more than I did before. You can kind of tell when things are about to come about. We’re a very competitive team. A talented team. I don’t think that will be the case at all….

“A.D. hits me with little jabs about free agency all the time, but he also understands,” Cousins said. “It was Jrue in that situation last [offseason], and we understood his situation. Of course, they throw their little jabs. They throw their little jokes. But they are serious at the same time. They are respectful about it at the same time.

The Pelicans are 15-14 and the seven seed in the West entering Friday night’s games, and if New Orleans has a shot at the playoffs come the deadline there is no way he gets moved. Ownership and management want a playoff appearance. They have greenlit adding one of the game’s top centers (Cousins) to go next to Davis, and last summer they paid big to keep Jrue Holiday at the point in New Orleans. If the Pelicans don’t make the playoffs (and possibly even if they do squeak in and get swept out in an ugly fashion), everyone in the organization expects a housecleaning. They have been on edge all season. With jobs on the line, they are not trading Cousins and getting worse short term even if you could argue it was the right basketball move long term.

Will Cousins re-sign with the Pelicans next summer? That will be about the money — what the Pelicans offer, and what other teams will offer in what is expected to be a tight free agent market, especially for centers.  DeAndre Jordan will be on the market as well, not to mention second-tier guys who will be more affordable for teams such as Brook Lopez. In that market, Cousins may want to stay where he likes his teammates and seems happy.

But first he has to get past the trade deadline.