PAUL GEORGE

Will Paul George’s injury change USA roster for 2016 Olympics?

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The pendulum has swung to the other side.

No doubt what happened to Paul George was gruesome. The fourth quarter of a relatively meaningless USA Basketball exhibition and one of the NBA’s rising stars goes up to block a James Harden shot, comes down with his foot on the base of too-close basketball stanchion and shatters his leg. He’s done for the next year, at least. Whether he is ever the same remains to be seen (although we all hope so).

It scared owners and GMs who have long feared such a thing and they leaned on their media sources about how this could be a tipping point for major NBA players in international competitions. How they don’t like to see the guys they are guaranteed to pay millions to playing for free internationally and risking these kinds of injuries.

Could what happened to George impact the USA’s roster for the 2016 Olympics in Rio?

Probably not much.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has already told the USA Today’s Sam Amick, “I don’t anticipate a major shift in the NBA’s participation in international competitions.”

Damian Lillard has already said he’s not backing away and his attitude will be the prevalent one among the ultra-competitive nature of NBA players.

Then there is the money. Many of the top players will want to go because the Olympics are a big stage and if you are an elite player trying to promote your brand it is the kind of platform you need to be on. To put it bluntly, if Kevin Durant wants to sell the latest Nike KD shoes in South America, Europe and China then the Olympics are a big marketing tool and everyone knows it. Same with Derrick Rose and adidas. Domestically NBA rings matter more than gold medals, but internationally that scale tips some. It’s hard to just say no.

Might LeBron James say no to chasing a basketball record fourth gold? Yes. But he might have anyway. There is no doubt some guys may be more hesitant and teams will be more cautious. But younger stars will want to go.

If a player is injured coming into the summer might the team pressure him to sit? Yes. But they would have done that anyway. See this summer when the Spurs would not release Manu Ginobili to play.

That summer is also a potentially big free agent summer and if a player doesn’t have a deal lined up or is trying to force a trade he may stay out. Think Kevin Love this summer.

But for the NBA to step in more unilaterally is hypocritical. The NBA asks players to play international exhibitions every year for free — NBA players do not get paid for those NBA pre-season games in China, Brazil, Mexico and the like (players are paid during the regular season, they get only a per diam during the preseason). The NBA is fine disrupting its schedule to have a couple of teams play one game in a week during the regular season in London.

But the Olympics would be bad?

NBA owners/GMs do have legitimate concerns. It’s less about Team USA and more about some international players who are pressured into EuroBasket and the World Cup and the Olympics and qualifying tournaments for all of them. It can be a drain. (It’s less of an issue with the very deep Team USA talent pool.) And Mark Cuban has an interesting idea in the NBA putting on its own World Cup so that the NBA owners would profit from these extra games (line their pockets instead of someone else’s’ and suddenly an international tournament is a good idea). Frankly both of those things can go hand-in-hand.

Former Commissioner David Stern floated the idea of doing with the Olympics what soccer has done — make it an under-22 tournament. The idea is to make the World Cup (run by FIBA or the NBA) a bigger event but limit the number of big events the main stars are asked to play. That can work, too, although it seems less likely.

The idea of limiting the number of international tournaments top stars are asked to play is a fair one.

But Pacers’ president Larry Bird is right that these kinds of injuries can happen anywhere. The NBA would be foolish to tell guys they can’t go to play at Rucker Park in New York, the Drew League in Los Angeles, The Goodman League in Washington D.C., the Seattle Pro-Am series or a host of other popular pro-ams in the summer because that helps grow the game, too.

It’s about balance. A better one may need to be struck with regard to international tournaments.

But the Olympics are too big a stage right now not to think the best and brightest will want to step on it and add a gold medal or two to their resume. To cut that off would be bad for the NBA.

Steven Adams gets his revenge, dunks all over Draymond Green (VIDEO)

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That’s a piece of revenge.

Draymond Green twice kicked Steven Adams in the nether regions this series, but with the chance to close out the Warriors in Game 6 Adams got some revenge — he put Green in a poster and dunked all over him.

This came as part of a second quarter run when the Thunder stretched the lead out to double digits.

Jordan Clarkson says he wants to return to Lakers, play for Luke Walton

TORONTO, ON - FEBRUARY 13: Jordan Clarkson of the Los Angeles Lakers is introduced for the Taco Bell Skills Challenge during NBA All-Star Weekend 2016 at Air Canada Centre on February 13, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Lakers guard Jordan Clarkson is a restricted free agent, and he is the kind of quality rotation player that teams with cash to burn may well try to poach. The Lakers have the right to match and likely will unless the offer is way over the top. But make no mistake, Clarkson will go with the team that offers him the most money.

That’s July, right now Clarkson is saying the right things about wanting to stay with the Lakers and play for new coach Luke Walton.

Clarkson was interviewed by Chris McGee of Time Warner Cable, as reported by lakersnation.com.

I want to stay in LA….I don’t really look at it as me being a free agent; I want to be here…

He (Luke) called me a few days after he got hired. We talked about the offensive system, what he sees in us young guys, where he sees the organization, the style we’re gonna play. I’m excited for him to come and work with us.

Most likely he gets a chance, the Lakers want to keep him. They see him as part of the future (or at least as an asset they can trade to get parts for their future). He’s saying all the right things to make Laker nation happy.

But it’s going to be about the money. It always is.

DeMarre Carroll was playing through a litany of injuries in playoffs

TORONTO, ON - MAY 23: DeMarre Carroll #5 of the Toronto Raptors defends LeBron James #23 of the Cleveland Cavaliers in the first quarter in game four of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at the Air Canada Centre on May 23, 2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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Toronto’s DeMarre Carroll was unquestionably terrible in the Eastern Conference Finals.

He shot just 30 percent overall and 19 percent from three. They brought him in as a “3&D” guy to slow down players like LeBron James, but he didn’t even register as a pest on LeBron’s radar. Heck, at one point Richard Jefferson blew past Carroll on the drive.

But as always, there is context. Remember that Carroll came back from knee surgery just for the playoffs, and that was far from the only injury he was dealing with, reports Bruce Arthur of the Toronto Star.

Apparently Carroll had everything but leprosy.

Did the gamble pay off? Carroll didn’t play well all playoffs, but the Raptors did reach the Eastern Conference Finals. It depends on perspective.

But Carroll needs to get healthy this summer and earn that $45 million over three years still left on his deal.

DeMar DeRozan doesn’t sound like guy looking to leave Toronto

TORONTO, ON - MAY 27:  DeMar DeRozan #10 of the Toronto Raptors reacts in the third quarter against the Cleveland Cavaliers in game six of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Air Canada Centre on May 27, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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DeMar DeRozan will be a free agent come July 1, and in a market flooded with money he’s going to have options. His name has been linked through rumors to his hometown Lakers all season, but they will be far from the only team making a call.

However, DeRozan doesn’t sound like a guy looking to leave Toronto.

He has said multiple times before how much he wanted to finish what was started north of the border and how much he loved the team and city. He said all of it again after the Raptors were eliminated from the playoffs by the Cavaliers on Friday. Check out this exit interview quote when DeRozan was asked if he could find a better situation than the one he’s in, via Zach Harper at CBSSports.com.

“I don’t think so,” DeRozan said. “My mindset has always been Toronto. I always preached it. I was passionate about it when we was losing. When we was terrible, I said I’m going to stick through this whole thing and I want to be that guy who brings this organization to where it is now. I definitely don’t want to switch up after we win.”

Or this.

But how appealing is Los Angeles?

“How appealing? I grew up in L.A.,” DeRozan said. “That’s my home. There’s not a part of L.A. I haven’t seen. I don’t get caught up into it. I let whoever comes up with that say what they want to say. Only thing appealing to me is the things I’ve done in this organization and the things that can be done here. And that’s always been my mindset.”

What should you read into this? If the money is equal, he’s going to choose Toronto over Los Angeles or any other destination.

But make no mistake, this is about the money. In most summers I would not say DeRozan is a max player, but in this summer with so much money flooding the market someone is going to offer it — and it’s probably the Raptors. Despite the holes in his game — lack of outside shooting, inconsistent defense — if the Raptors lose him for nothing they take a big step back. I expect next season he will be putting on a Raptors jersey again.

But July is always an unpredictable month.