P.J. Tucker

P.J. Tucker gets jail time for super extreme DUI, apologizes


P.J. Tucker was arrested in May after driving erratically and then registering a .222 blood-alcohol content. 

Following the incident, Tucker signed a three-year, $16.5 million contract with the Phoenix Suns. The Suns reportedly knew about the charge – called super extreme DUI – when re-signing the starting small forward.

Now, Tucker is taking responsibility – both through the legal system and with a public statement.

Kevin Zimmerman of Valley of the Suns:

Tucker pleaded guilty to super extreme DUI at a disposition hearing at Scottsdale City Court and will spend three days in jail in addition to other penalties.

In addition to his jail time, Tucker will face 11 days house arrest, though he will be able to leave for work for no more than 12 hours per day. He will submit to substance abuse screening and counseling, and could face probation for up to five years. Tucker will also have an interlock device installed on his vehicle and have to pay several fines.

Tucker and Suns president Lon Babby also released statements, as relayed by Zimmerman.


“I would like to express my gratitude to the people of Phoenix for their love and support during my time as a Phoenix Sun. Thank you to the Phoenix Suns organization for supporting me throughout this difficult time. And, of course my wife Tracey, family and friends, who just keep loving me. I cannot express how much I appreciate and value the many blessings that I have been given – love and abundance that I never imagined. I am truly blessed. I am so grateful that no one was hurt as a result of my choice to drive impaired.

I am truly sorry and I take full responsibility for my actions. No excuses. It is now my responsibility to examine my life and make the changes necessary to ensure this never happens again. That process has begun and will continue with the love and support of my family, friends and, of course, the amazing Phoenix Suns.

There is both a lesson and an opportunity in this experience: I learned the lesson the hard way – the opportunity is to ensure others don’t.

The good that resulted from making this mistake is realizing people’s capacity to forgive. Thank you all so much for the love and forgiveness that I have received throughout this time.

I will not let you down.

Thank you.”


“Like P.J. himself, the Phoenix Suns take P.J.’s behavior very seriously. We remain fully committed to the highest standards of personal and professional conduct as we develop a championship culture. All of the members of our team, both on the court and in the front office, understand the importance of obeying the law and conducting ourselves in a way that honors our community. In considering this matter, we concluded that P.J. was sincere in his remorse and in his resolve to accept the consequences of his actions. We are convinced that he will take the necessary steps to avoid any such conduct in the future. The Suns do not in any way condone his conduct, but we do support him as he works through this.”

It’s good to see Tucker say all the right things. That’s all he can do at this point.

Hopefully, he heeds his words going forward.

PBT Extra: Kobe Bryant understands now is time to walk away

Leave a comment

It was expected Kobe Bryant would retire at the end of this season.

It was not expected Kobe would make that official on Nov. 29 — it’s caught the media at Staples Center Sunday (of which I was one) and the fans by surprise.

In this PBT Extra, I talk with Jenna Corrado about the mood inside Staples Center Sunday.

More importantly, I discuss the sense I got that Kobe understands it’s time to walk away, and he is at peace with that.

Luke Walton: Warriors concerned about health, not 72 wins

Andre Iguodala, Luke Walton
Leave a comment

Stephen Curry acknowledges the Warriors – who are 18-0 and won four straight to end last season – talk about the NBA record of 33 consecutive wins.

But what about another major record Golden State is chasing, 72 wins in a season?

Shooting guard Klay Thompson called it possible. General manager Bob Myers deemed it impossible.

Interim coach Luke Walton would prefer everyone just keep quiet.

Walton, via CSN Bay Area:

“The 72 thing is far, far away,” Walton said. “We shouldn’t be spending any time thinking about that.

“I’ve also said before that we’re not going to coach this season trying to chase that record,” Walton said

“We’re still going to give players nights off on back-to-backs,” he added. “And we’re going to do our best to limit minutes for some of our players. Our main concern is being healthy come playoff time.”

I don’t think Golden State will win 72 games, but prioritizing health won’t necessary stop the Warriors. They’re so deep.

They outscore opponents by 5.8 points per 100 possessions when Curry sits, 5.6 when Draymond Green sits. Those marks would rank seventh among all NBA teams.

Golden State has the luxury of resting players and continuing to win. That’s what makes the chase for 72 realistic. This team is less likely than most to wear down late in a season where it’s pushing to win every game.

Health entering the playoffs is important, but a 72-win season would raise these Warriors to legendary status. If they’re in range late in the season, I think they’ll go for it – even if the top seed is already secured.

But for now, Walton is probably taking the right approach. Plenty of teams start fast (though never this fast) then drift back toward the pack. No point risking Golden State’s health yet.

Kevin Durant to media: You treated Kobe Bryant ‘like s—‘

Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant

Kevin Durant once told the media, “You guys really don’t know s—.”

The Thunder star expressed regret, but if he knew how we were going to treat Kobe Bryant, he might have stuck to his guns.

Durant, via Anthony Slater of The Oklahoman:

I did idolize Kobe Bryant. I studied him, wanted to be like him. He was our Michael Jordan. I watched Michael towards the end of his career when he was with the Wizards, and I seen that’s what Kobe emerged as the guy for us.

I’ve been disappointed this year because you guys treated him like s—. He’s a legend, and all I hear is about how bad he’s playing, how bad he’s shooting. It’s time for him to hang it up. You guys treated one of our legends like s—, and I didn’t really like it. So hopefully, now you can start being nice to him now that he decided to retire after this year. It was sad the way he was getting treated, in my opinion.

But he had just an amazing career, a guy who changed the game for me as a player mentally and physically. Means so much to the game of basketball. Somebody I’m always going to look to for advice, for help, for anything. Just a brilliant, brilliant, intelligent man. And it’s sad to see him go.

Kobe is shooting 20% from the floor and 30% on 3-pointers for a 2-14 team. How else should we describe his season?

Why not bash the person most publicly critical of Kobe? Or the many people around the NBA who recognize how far Kobe has fallen? Or Byron Scott, who has repeatedly intensified discussion of Kobe’s demise?

Why is the media, which is not some monolithic entity anyway, the primary target?

There are writers who fawn over Kobe, writers who criticize him and many more who do both. We don’t all think alike.

If we did, Durant would be bound to treat Kobe like s—, too.

Hassan Whiteside thanks Hassan Whiteside in Kobe Bryant tribute


Like many players, Hassan Whiteside posted a tribute to Kobe Bryant upon the Laker star’s retirement announcement.

But Whiteside’s is a bit, um, different.

Whiteside salutes himself for making Kobe smile. (That’s not a smile.) The Heat center also tweeted a screenshot of the Instagram post with the hashtag “#koberetire,” which sounds pretty commanding.

Is Whiteside in on the joke or is he that self-centered? I’m honestly not entirely sure.